Astronomy

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  • The Sky This Week - Thursday September 4 to Thursday September 11

    Astroblog
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:39 am
    The Full Moon is Tuesday September 9. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky. Jupiter becomes more prominent in the morning sky. Comets C/2013 A1 Siding Spring and C/2013 V5 are in the reach of small telescopes.The Full Moon is Tuesday September 9. The Moon is at perigee (closest to the Earth) on the 8th.Evening sky on Saturday September 6 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 (6:30 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mercury is now reasonably high above the horizon in the twilight. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local…
  • World War II

    StarDate Online
    damonddb
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    AUDIO:[voice of Adolph Hitler...] 75 years ago today, Adolph Hitler was trying to explain to the world why Germany had invaded Poland just the day before. ANNOUNCER: Poland, for the first time this evening, has shot at regular soldiers upon our territory....voice of Hitler...From now on, bomb will be met by bomb! And it was. The following day, Britain and France declared war on Germany, marking the start of World War II. It was a war in which science and technology would play crucial roles. Sonar and radar made it easier to detect enemy submarines and airplanes. Advances in aeronautics…
  • Detailed gravitational lens modelling of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223

    Astronomy Cmarchesin
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Fig. 1:Image of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. Several background images are multiply imaged (marked by circles). There is one particularly striking example of a face-on spiral galaxy; zoomed images of this galaxy are enlarged as insets. (From Rau et al. 2014)Fig. 2:Contours of the cluster mass distribution including scaled cluster galaxies for two different models (blue: position based modelling; red: hybrid modelling). The grey background shows the same observation as in figure 1, but in just one colour filter (F555W). (From Rau et al.
  • Targeting Sagittarius

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:55 am
    M8, The Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius, by John Chumack Sagittarius is an incredibly rich area for stargazing, but it’s only easily viewable for a short time. Summer is the best season for observing, but even then it stays low on the southern horizon. Sagittarius is an easy constellation even for children to spot because it has a grouping of stars that looks almost exactly like a teapot. Get out a pair of binoculars or use the finderscope on your telescope and scan the area until you find a fuzzy patch in the sky. Then look through the eyepiece of the telescope to see if you’ve captured a…
  • Amazing Video Timelapse Of Big Telescopes At Work In Chile

    Universe Today
    Elizabeth Howell
    2 Sep 2014 | 10:47 am
    What’s it like to spend a night at a huge telescope observatory? Jordi Busque recorded a brilliant timelapse of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). What makes this video unique is not only the exotic location in Chile, but the use of sound in the area rather than music. (...)Read the rest of Amazing Video Timelapse Of Big Telescopes At Work In Chile (113 words) © Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | One comment | Post tags: ALMA, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Very Large Telescope, VLT Feed…
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    Astronomy Today

  • Targeting Sagittarius

    Kelly
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:55 am
    M8, The Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius, by John Chumack Sagittarius is an incredibly rich area for stargazing, but it’s only easily viewable for a short time. Summer is the best season for observing, but even then it stays low on the southern horizon. Sagittarius is an easy constellation even for children to spot because it has a grouping of stars that looks almost exactly like a teapot. Get out a pair of binoculars or use the finderscope on your telescope and scan the area until you find a fuzzy patch in the sky. Then look through the eyepiece of the telescope to see if you’ve captured a…
  • Observing Summer Constellations

    Kelly
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The Milky Way and Vega by John Chumack On summer evenings as adults sit around bonfires and kids run in the yard playing flashlight tag, eyes turn skyward. Teach your friends and family the most important summer constellations with this handy guide on what star formations are overhead. Start with the easiest constellation just to orient yourself in the star-filled sky. The Big Dipper is neither a true constellation or a specifically summer constellation, but it will help you get started. The Big Dipper is easy to located in the northwest on summer evenings and is circumpolar, meaning that it…
  • Crossing off the Bucket List: Zodiacal Light

    Kelly
    27 May 2014 | 12:11 pm
    The Zodiacal Light looks pyramidal shaped from horizon stretching upward. Credit: ESO/Y. Beletsky Amateur astronomers never really take a vacation from stargazing. And in fact, sometimes vacations provide for the best stargazing. Over spring break this year my family and I did a tour of the national parks, starting and ending our vacation in Las Vegas, one of the most light polluted locations on Earth. But McCarran International airport made for a good spot to begin our travels first to Utah’s national parks, then to Great Basin National Park in Nevada along the loneliest highway in…
  • Up for the Lunar Eclipse

    Kelly
    30 Apr 2014 | 6:14 am
    The Moon in Eclipse with Mars and Spica, April 2014 As a chronic insomniac, I didn’t feel the need to set my alarm for the April lunar eclipse. Just the night before I had been awake from 3:45 to 5:30, so I figured that there was a good chance that sometime within the window of the eclipse I would be awake. At my location, totality would last from 2:07 to 3:25 a.m. with partial phases for an hour on either side of that. Surely I would be awake for some of it. I was actually deep asleep around 2:15 a.m. when my phone buzzed beside me three times. Someone who follows my twitter feed was…
  • In Search of Noctilucent Clouds

    Kelly
    31 Mar 2014 | 6:13 am
    Noctilucent Clouds as seen by the ISS On a list of elusive observing targets, noctilucent clouds are one of the most challenging and one I have yet to spy. These clouds, also called polar mesospheric clouds or night-shining clouds, are found in the mesosphere, higher than all other clouds. Most clouds and weather on earth are confined to the troposphere, or layer of air closest to the ground. The mesosphere is located 80 kilometers above our planet’s surface. The mesosphere is a region that’s extremely cold and dry, and because of this, it is uncommon for clouds to form in an area that is…
 
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    Astronomy News

  • Comet Mosaic

    Tom
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:52 pm
    Make a mosaic from Rosetta’s comet pictures. ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM ESA’s Rosetta is now taking images from just 61 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. That is close enough so Rosetta is imaging the comet in about quarters. The above four-image mosaic is featured at the Rosetta blog was taken on 31 August 2014. It’s really not quite a mosaic yet  If you look at the four-panels you will see some overlap. The images were made from 20 minute exposures and there is also some rotation from the mutual movement of Rosetta and comet. We, the public are invited to create a mosaic…
  • Martian Landscape

    Tom
    1 Sep 2014 | 4:12 am
    A Navcam view of the Martian landscape. Click for the larger version. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech   A picture of the Martian landscape but not from Curiosity. This is the the Navcam view from Opportunity. Yes, Opportunity is still doing science on Mars after 3,749 Martian days when this image was taken (10 August 2014). There has been an increasing number of computer resets on Opportunity and the rover team is making plans to reformat the flash memory. The reformat will clear the memory and identify bad cells and with any luck will remedy the computer-reset issue. The reformat is…
  • September Sky

    Tom
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:50 am
    NASA’s JPL gives us “What’s Up for September 2014″ One of the nice things about this time of year is the clearing skies. I mean really clear skies, cooler temperatures and stable “seeing” kind of clear. If you have a telescope you probably know exactly what I mean. We have a few nice pairings of stars / planets / moon. These pairings are especially nice for casual viewing and interesting conversation with those friends who might not otherwise notice and I find they almost always will look. I don’t always get the best view of the zodiacal light right…
  • This Week @NASA

    Tom
    30 Aug 2014 | 6:14 am
    It’s been a busy week at NASA and was pleased to have see the news about the Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket in video format. A good episode and as always you can get a more in-depth account of the topics at TW@N Source
  • Neptune’s Clouds

    Tom
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:57 pm
    Voyager’s look at clouds on Neptune. Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory / NASA Planetary Photojournal The bit of an interlude in the ESA’s Comet watch blog is a good time to look at some of Voyager 2′s images of Neptune. This is one of my favorites. I don’t really know if there is more than coincidence that the New Horizon’s spacecraft crossed the Neptune orbit 29 years almost to the day after Voyager started its Neptune encounter. There is a lot of comparisons being drawn between the New Horizon’s and Voyager missions. Hey I’m on board with it.
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    Universe Today

  • Universe Today Wins a Parsec Award for the Guide to Space

    Fraser Cain
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:36 pm
    As you might know, a few of us were attending Dragon*Con this weekend in Atlanta, where the Parsec Awards are held every year. Astronomy Cast has been up for a nomination every year, but we’ve always lost out to other folks like Star Talk and Planetary Radio. Well, this year, we took a different tack and submitted our Guide to Space video series for the Fact Behind the Fiction category… and we won! A big thanks and congratulations to my video co-creator, Jason Harmer as well as everyone else who has helped us write, edit, produce and shoot these videos: Susie Murph, Brian…
  • Astrophoto: I Need Warp Speed in 3 Minutes or We’re All Dead

    Nancy Atkinson
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:40 pm
    Is Earth going at warp speed in this image? This is a composite of two photographs, one for the foreground and one for the sky. The photographer zoomed in on the image of the Milky Way for the last 10 seconds of the exposure to give it a ‘warp speed’ look. Credit and copyright: Mike Taylor/Mike Taylor Photography. Whoa! Having just returned from the science and science fiction mashup that is Dragon Con, my mind is still combining the two. Then I saw this image from Mike Taylor, which is one of the most unique Milky Way images I’ve ever seen. Perfect! Mike said he combined…
  • Here’s Your Chance To Send A Message To An Asteroid

    Elizabeth Howell
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:37 pm
    NASA is planning to launch a time capsule aboard the Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft, which is expected to head to an asteroid in 2016. Credit: Heather Roper/University of Arizona/OSIRIS-REx What’s your vision for solar system exploration? And how cool would it be to send it literally into the solar system? NASA is offering its fans the chance to compose a tweet or send a picture showing how we can step out into the cosmos. The best ones among these will be placed aboard a spacecraft that will zoom to an asteroid…
  • Amazing Video Timelapse Of Big Telescopes At Work In Chile

    Elizabeth Howell
    2 Sep 2014 | 10:47 am
    What’s it like to spend a night at a huge telescope observatory? Jordi Busque recorded a brilliant timelapse of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). What makes this video unique is not only the exotic location in Chile, but the use of sound in the area rather than music. (...)Read the rest of Amazing Video Timelapse Of Big Telescopes At Work In Chile (113 words) © Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | One comment | Post tags: ALMA, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Very Large Telescope, VLT Feed…
  • Hunting for “Minimoons” Orbiting Earth

    David Dickinson
    2 Sep 2014 | 9:51 am
    PanSTARRS on patrol. Credit: Bryce Bolin/University of Hawaii, used with permission. It’s an engaging thought experiment. What if Earth had multiple moons?  Our world has one large natural satellite, just over a quarter the diameter, 1/50th the volume, and less than 1/80th the mass of our fair world. In fact, the Earth-Moon system has sometimes been referred to as a “binary planet,” and our Moon stands as the largest natural satellite of any planet — that is, if you subscribe to bouncing Pluto and Charon out of “the club” — in contrast to its primary of any moon in our solar…
 
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    Astroblog

  • The Sky This Week - Thursday September 4 to Thursday September 11

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:39 am
    The Full Moon is Tuesday September 9. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky. Jupiter becomes more prominent in the morning sky. Comets C/2013 A1 Siding Spring and C/2013 V5 are in the reach of small telescopes.The Full Moon is Tuesday September 9. The Moon is at perigee (closest to the Earth) on the 8th.Evening sky on Saturday September 6 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 (6:30 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mercury is now reasonably high above the horizon in the twilight. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 28 to Thursday September 4

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:12 am
    The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday September 2. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky, forming a nice triangle with Alpha Librae. The trio are visited by the Moon on the 31st and September 1. This is the last week to see Venus is low in the morning twilight. Jupiter rises higher.The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday September 2.Evening sky on Sunday August 31 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are at their closest under the head of  Scorpius. Similar views will be seen elsewhere…
  • Mars, Saturn and Zubenelgenubi close (25-27th August 2014)

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:55 am
    Evening sky on Monday August 25 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are at their closest under the head of  Scorpius. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).After slowly drawing together Mars and Saturn are at their closest tonight (the 25th) tomorrow night and Wednsday night (the 27th).Mars and Saturn form a triangle with Alpha Librae (also called Zubenelgenubi) at this time. Go out tonight or over the next few days and have a look.Here is an animation of them drawing together from…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 21 to Thursday August 28

    19 Aug 2014 | 6:12 am
    The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. The Moon is close to Mercury on the 27th. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky are at their closest this week. Venus is low in the morning twilight while Jupiter rises higher. The Moon is close to Venus and Jupiter on the 23rd and 24th.The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. The Moon is at apogee (furthest from the Earth), on the 24th.  Evening sky on Monday August 25 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are at their closest under the head…
  • Mars and Saturn, Sunday 17 August, 2014

    18 Aug 2014 | 6:38 am
    Mars, Zubenelgenubi and Saturn almost from a line below the head of the Scorpion on Sunday 17 August (three brightest objects mid left, click to embiggen)t. 10 x 15 second exposures at ASA 400 with a "point and shoot" Canon IXUS, stacked in ImageJ, SUMMED an light contrast editing applied. While the conjunction of Venus and Jupiter was quite good, Mars and Saturn have been slowly approaching each other. They will be closest on the 25th but not as close as Jupiter and Venus were this morning).Mars, Zubenelgenubi and Saturn actually form a straight line tonight, but cloud got in the way.
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    Hogg's Research

  • exoplanet search

    1 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Back when we were in Tübingen, Foreman-Mackey promised Schölkopf that he would find some new exoplanets by September 1. That's today! He failed, although he has some very impressive results recovering some known systems that are supposed to be hard to find. That is, it looks like existing systems are found at higher significance for us than for other groups, so we ought to be able to find some lower-significance systems. The key technology (we think) is our insanely flexible noise model for stellar (and Kepler) variability, that uses a Gaussian process not just of time, but of hundreds of…
  • detecting clock drifts

    30 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    I continued working on "hot Jupiters as clocks", building a system to find clock drifts. I find that the precision with which a drift is detected is slightly less than I found for the precision of the clock phase or offset; this makes sense, because any drift model has multiple parameters. It took me a while to get good sampling to work (with emcee, and a sensible burn-in schedule) but it now seems to. I can now start searching for signals. Heather Knutson (Caltech) gave me a couple of suggestions.
  • exoclocks: period and phase precision

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    It is back to the non-research grind now, but that didn't stop me from stealing a couple hours to work on Foreman-Mackey and my "stellar clocks" project. My question was: How precisely can you phase up or measure the time using a transiting hot Jupiter. That is, how good is a hot Jupiter as a clock? If good, we could use it for all kinds of fun things.I started with fake data. As my loyal reader knows, I am against using fake data; all it provides is a functional test of your code! But over the years I have come around: After all, it provides a functional test of your code! It also permits…
  • words on a plane

    27 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    While in transit back to NYC, I worked on writing more about Ness and my quadratic-in-tags model for stellar spectra in our manuscript, and she got the quadratic model to work from end to end. It looks extremely promising.
  • data science, data-driven models

    26 Aug 2014 | 11:00 am
    Today was my last day in Heidelberg for 2014. Sad day! I spent most of my research time working with Ness on our data-driven models of stars. We got the code to go from first-order (linear) linear fitting to second-order (quadratic) linear fitting, and vowed that we would never go to third order! We will use a Gaussian Process before we do that. We discussed outliers—both outlier stars and outlier pixels—and how to deal with them while still retaining computational tractability, good probability of convergence to a good optimum (or good sampling prospects), and the likelihood…
 
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    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • Detailed gravitational lens modelling of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223

    1 Sep 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Fig. 1:Image of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. Several background images are multiply imaged (marked by circles). There is one particularly striking example of a face-on spiral galaxy; zoomed images of this galaxy are enlarged as insets. (From Rau et al. 2014)Fig. 2:Contours of the cluster mass distribution including scaled cluster galaxies for two different models (blue: position based modelling; red: hybrid modelling). The grey background shows the same observation as in figure 1, but in just one colour filter (F555W). (From Rau et al.
  • Radio Telescopes Settle Controversy Over Distance to Pleiades

    1 Sep 2014 | 8:00 pm
    With parallax technique, astronomers observe object at opposite ends of Earth's orbit around the Sun to precisely measure its distance.Credit: Alexandra Angelich, NRAO/AUI/NSF Optical image of the PleiadesCredit: NOAO/AURA/NSF  Astronomers have used a worldwide network of radio telescopes to resolve a controversy over the distance to a famous star cluster -- a controversy that posed a potential challenge to scientists' basic understanding of how stars form and evolve. The new work shows that the measurement made by a cosmic-mapping research satellite was wrong.The astronomers studied the…
  • Magnetar discovered close to supernova remnant Kesteven 79

    1 Sep 2014 | 5:52 am
    Supernova remnant Kesteven 79Copyright: ESA/XMM-Newton/ Ping Zhou, Nanjing University, ChinaMassive stars end their life with a bang, exploding as supernovas and releasing massive amounts of energy and matter. What remains of the star is a small and extremely dense remnant: a neutron star or a black hole.Neutron stars come in several flavours, depending on properties such as their ages, the strength of the magnetic field concealed beneath their surface, or the presence of other stars nearby. Some of the energetic processes taking place around neutron stars can be explored with X-ray…
  • Orion Rocks! Pebble-Size Particles May Jump-Start Planet Formation

    31 Aug 2014 | 8:00 pm
    Radio/optical composite of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex showing the OMC-2/3 star-forming filament. GBT data is shown in orange. Uncommonly large dust grains there may kick-start planet formation. Credit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF); We acknowledge the use of NASA's SkyView Facility located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.  Zoom in of the OMC-2/3 regionCredit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF); We acknowledge the use of NASA's SkyView Facility located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. GBT data of the filaments in OMC-2/3…
  • Sonograms of Young Stars

    29 Aug 2014 | 8:10 pm
    An optical image of the region NGC 2264 containing a cluster of young stars. Astronomers have measured pulsations in the light of some of these stars and used them to infer the physical processes underway before they mature and begin to burn hydrogen fuel.Credit: ESO The evolution of a star depends crucially on its initial birth mass and composition, and developments in its early lifetime. These initial properties determine, for example, the production of the chemical elements forged later on in the star's nuclear furnace, and its early angular momentum affects the subsequent…
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    The Urban Astronomer

  • KFOG Broadcast - August 12, 2014

    22 Aug 2014 | 8:59 am
    I paid a visit to the KFOG Morning Show and had a fun chat with Renee about the Supermoon, Perseid Meteor Shower, How to Look At The Night Sky, and Star Parties in and around San Francisco. Click here to listen. 
  • Jupiter & Venus Conjunction – Closest Approach Since 2000

    14 Aug 2014 | 4:08 pm
    After the Moon, the two brightest objects in the night sky are the planets Venus and Jupiter. Venus is a close neighbor and a very reflective planet, dominating morning and evening skies with its brilliant white shimmer against the changing colors of the dawn or dusk sky. Jupiter is the giant planet of the Solar System and despite its distance, is a bold and bright object for us to enjoy, especially in a telescope or binoculars. Venus & Jupiter ConjunctionThese two planets, like all of the objects in the Solar System, gradually change their position with respect to the background stars…
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2014 - what to expect

    10 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    This year’s Perseid Meteor Shower will peak on August 11-12-13 and should offer up a moderately pleasing view of meteors but will be impacted by the nearly Full Moon. Meteors come in all sizes and shapes and during a reliable shower like the Perseids, you can see them all. However, moonlight increases the ambient lighting of the entire night sky and consequently makes the faint meteors all but invisible. The medium-strength meteors and the fireballs will shine through the glare of course, so the Perseids will have a showing, but just not at the rate we often see during a truly dark sky…
  • August 2014 Supermoon

    7 Aug 2014 | 4:22 pm
    Moon at Apogee and PerigeeWe are in the midst of a three-month period of Supermoons, a confluence of orbital nodes that brings us the Full Moon phase at the same time as Perigee, the closest approach of the Moon to the Earth. The next one is on August 10. The difference in the Moon's distance from the Earth from Perigee to Apogee is quite substantial, varying from 222,000 miles out to 253,000 miles, leading to the a 14% difference in the apparent size of the Moon. In addition, the Moon will be at the peak of the ascending node of its orbit, placing it somewhat higher in the sky than is…
  • August Opens With an Evening Show

    31 Jul 2014 | 11:10 pm
    Evening ShowThe waning crescent Moon creates a majestic skyscape to open the month of August, shimmering against the dusk sky with the shiny colors of Spica, Mars and Saturn in the path. Each evening the trio of planets and stars will have the Moon in their midst, and the Moon will slip gradually eastward with each successive night.I enjoy seeing the waxing Moon with its delicate shape and edge-on illumination from the Sun. It's fun to see in a telescope and it always holds the promise of the gentle glow of Earthshine. In the middle of summer, the ecliptic is low on the southern horizon and…
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    sci.astro

  • Re: EINSTEINIANS ASK QUESTIONS TO THEMSELVES

    2 Sep 2014 | 12:11 am
    Etienne Klein, the leader of Einsteiniana in France, has been asking the honest question ("Isn't it time for me to stop feeding on the absurd consequences of Einstein's 1905 false constant-speed-of-light postulate?") to himself for years. So far the answer has been "No it isn't": http://www.youtube
  • BULLSHIT THEORY THISCLOSE TO ERADICATION

    1 Sep 2014 | 5:32 pm
    When is Jay Rockefeller, the esteemed senator from West Virginia -- chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, SCIENCE and Transportation -- going to live up to the position he has held since 2009? When is Lamar Smith, the esteemed congressman from Texas -- chairman of the House Committee o
  • Re: EINSTEINIANS ASK QUESTIONS TO THEMSELVES

    1 Sep 2014 | 3:52 pm
    A decade ago Joao Magueijo seemed to be very close to asking the honest question ("Isn't it time for me to stop feeding on the absurd consequences of Einstein's 1905 false constant-speed-of-light postulate?") to himself: http://www.amazon.com/Faster-Than-Speed-Light-Speculation/dp/0738205257 Joao
  • Re: LA SCIENCE EINSTEINIENNE : UN SAUT DANS LE NEANT

    1 Sep 2014 | 3:58 am
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controverse_sur_la_paternit%C3%A9_de_la_relativit%C3%A9 Thibault Damour: "Comme Lorentz et Poincaré pensaient toujours le temps en termes de temps universel absolu de Newton, ils n'ont jamais suggéré, comme Einstein le fit, qu'une horloge en mouvement puisse battre un t
  • IS IT A BIRD? IS IT A PLANE? NO, IT'S ONLY A BOWL OF DUCK SOUP!

    1 Sep 2014 | 2:46 am
    DINNER'S READY! Somebody tell the Smithsonian that its goose is cooked http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121206110536-goose-story-top.jpg < http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5123/5288567887_5fc89ab2c5.jpg < <              ============ < When is Jay Rockefeller, the esteemed senator from West V
 
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    uk.sci.astronomy

  • Cheap Nike Air Max 87 Shoes Air Max 87 Hyperfuse Shoes wholesale www.TopWholesaler168.co

    30 Aug 2014 | 1:27 pm
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    30 Aug 2014 | 1:26 pm
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  • Lets meet up in the Awards functions

    5 Aug 2014 | 11:13 pm
    Dear Professional Colleague, Greetings! I am pleased to write to you about "Global Leadership Awards 2014" on 20th December, 2014, at MMA, 411, Samruddhi Commercial Complex, ChincholiBunder Road Ext, Malad (West), Mumbai – 400 064. The awards process allows participants to strengthen their story a
  • Re: Fireball over Somerset

    5 Aug 2014 | 3:39 am
    "Hils" wrote in message news:lr3ulg$eb2$1@speranza.aioe.org... > Seen over North Somerset today at 2203 UTC, SW to NE, duration about 2s, > about a quarter the diameter of the moon, brighter than a full moon. Looks like it may have been an early Perseid. ----- Original Mess
  • Fireball over Somerset

    27 Jul 2014 | 3:32 pm
    Seen over North Somerset today at 2203 UTC, SW to NE, duration about 2s, about a quarter the diameter of the moon, brighter than a full moon.
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    Big Picture Science

  • Welcome to Our Labor-atory

    1 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE Hi ho, hi ho … it’s out with work we go! As you relax this holiday weekend, step into our labor-atory and imagine a world with no work allowed. Soft robots help us with tasks at home and at the office, while driverless cars allow us to catch ZZZZs in the front seat. Plus, the Internet of Everything interconnects all your devices, from your toaster to your roaster to … you. So there’s no need to ever get off the couch. But is a machine-ruled world a true utopia? And, the invention that got us into our 24/7 rat race: Edison’s electric light. Guests: Barry Trimmer –…
  • ZZZZZs Please

    25 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE We’ve all hit the snooze button when the alarm goes off, but why do we crave sleep in the first place? We explore the evolutionary origins of sleep … the study of narcolepsy in dogs … and could novel drugs and technologies cut down on our need for those zzzzs. Plus, ditch your dream journal: a brain scanner may let you record – and play back – your dreams. And, branch out with the latest development in artificial light: bioluminescent trees. How gene tinkering may make your houseplants both grow and glow. Guests: Emmanuel Mignot – Professor of psychiatry and behavioral…
  • Moving Right Along

    18 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    You think your life is fast-paced, but have you ever seen a bacterium swim across your countertop? You’d be surprised how fast they can move. Find out why modeling the swirl of hurricanes takes a roomful of mathematicians and supercomputers, and how galaxies can move away from us faster than the speed of light. Also, what happens when we try to stop the dance of atoms, cooling things down to the rock bottom temperature known as absolute zero. And why your watch doesn’t keep the same time when you’re in a jet as when you’re at the airport. It’s all due to the fact that motion is…
  • De-Extinction Show

    11 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE Maybe goodbye isn’t forever. Get ready to mingle with mammoths and gaze upon a ground sloth. Scientists want to give some animals a round-trip ticket back from oblivion. Learn how we might go from scraps of extinct DNA to creating live previously-extinct animals, and the man who claims it’s his mission to repopulate the skies with passenger pigeons. But even if we have the tools to bring vanished animals back, should we? Plus, the extinction of our own species: are we engineering the end of humans via our technology? Guests: Beth Shapiro – Associate professor of ecology and…
  • Eye Spy

    4 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Who’s watching you? Could be anyone, really. Social media sites, webcams, CCTV cameras and smartphones have made keeping tabs on you as easy as tapping “refresh” on a tablet. And who knows what your cell phone records are telling the NSA? Surveillance technology has privacy on the run, as we navigate between big data benefits and Big Brother intrusion. Find out why wearing Google Glass could make everything you see the property of its creator, and which Orwellian technologies are with us today. But just how worried should we be? A cyber security expert weighs in. Also, the benefits of…
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    StarDate Online

  • World War II

    damonddb
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    AUDIO:[voice of Adolph Hitler...] 75 years ago today, Adolph Hitler was trying to explain to the world why Germany had invaded Poland just the day before. ANNOUNCER: Poland, for the first time this evening, has shot at regular soldiers upon our territory....voice of Hitler...From now on, bomb will be met by bomb! And it was. The following day, Britain and France declared war on Germany, marking the start of World War II. It was a war in which science and technology would play crucial roles. Sonar and radar made it easier to detect enemy submarines and airplanes. Advances in aeronautics…
  • Paper Black Holes

    damonddb
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A scientific paper that was published 75 years ago doesn’t sound like much to get excited about. It was called “On Continued Gravitational Contraction.” Yet its conclusions were remarkable. It said that when a heavy star uses up the nuclear fuel in its core, gravity would squeeze it to an infinitely small point. To put it in more modern terms, the star would form a black hole. The paper was written by J. Robert Oppenheimer, a physicist at the University of California, and a graduate student, Hartland Snyder. At the time, scientists were just beginning to understand the process that…
  • Clearing the Gaps

    damonddb
    30 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Dark gaps separate the rings of Saturn in this 2009 image from the Cassini spacecraft. The gaps are cleared by the gravitational influence of small moons. (One of those moons, Epimetheus, casts a long shadow across the rings — the dark vertical streak at bottom center.) [NASA/JPL/SSI] Text ©2014 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
  • Moon and Planets

    damonddb
    30 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The weekend wraps up with a beautiful display in the evening sky tonight: a tight grouping of the Moon and the bright planets Mars and Saturn. Yellow-orange Mars is close to the lower left of the Moon at nightfall, with golden Saturn about the same distance to the lower right of the Moon. If you look at Mars through a telescope, you may spot the planet’s white polar ice caps, plus some large patches of bright orange — regions that are covered with dust — and other patches of dark gray — bare volcanic rock. The main feature you’d see at Saturn, though, is its broad rings — wide…
  • Panhu

    damonddb
    29 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A couple of ancient star patterns wheel low across the south on summer nights. The teapot of Sagittarius is due south at nightfall, with the wide triangle of Capricornus far to its left, in the southeast. A tiny group of four faint stars stands about halfway between these two prominent patterns, on the western edge of Sagittarius. In western skylore, it’s named Terebellum, after one of the four stars. To Chinese skywatchers, though, these four stars are known as the Country of the Dogs. Legend says that the ancient Emperor Ku was plagued by a warring tribe on China’s western frontier. He…
 
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    A Pacific View

  • Hurricane Iselle's aftermath

    12 Aug 2014 | 12:38 am
    Hawaii, especially the district of Puna on the Big Island, rarely makes the news, even on the local TV stations in the State. It's a neglected district with many quite poor people living here. Some areas are very beautiful and have many vacation rentals for visitors, some are ravaged by lava flows, but overall it is a large area (roughly the size of Oahu) with thousands of relatively poor families.Hurricane Iselle devastated much of the district last Thursday night. Thousands of people are without power or running water, some are still trapped on their streets by downed trees. Houses have…
  • Well, it's in the public domain now - UKIRT's future

    24 Apr 2014 | 2:05 am
    Latest news can be seen here -SFGate news about UKIRT. I'm sure other media sources will pick things up over the next day or so. Local rags picked it up quickly but aren't the places I want to direct people to. Don't know anything about SFGate, but haven't hit a paywall there yet.
  • The Long Goodbye

    15 Mar 2014 | 1:23 am
    Eddie, the cat on the right, has been with me almost since the day I arrived in Hawaii. She's approaching 18 years old now and as a kitten wasn't expected to survive her first year. She was 10-weeks old and just skin and bones and clearly the runt of the litter when I adopted her. The person at the Humane Society told me she needed a lot of love and care to survive, and when her adopted sister, Patsy, died just a few weeks later from FIP, the vet said it was likely she had contracted the disease as well and would die young.Well, over 17 years later she is still with me, nearly as energetic as…
  • A room with a view

    18 Dec 2013 | 9:33 pm
    Well, Pam opened her Christmas present early, so I can post it here now as well! This was the view from our hotel room in Astoria, Oregon, of the Columbia River and the Astoria-Megler Bridge (you can click on the picture for a much larger version). I can't say enough good things about the Cannery Pier Hotel, it's one of the best places we have ever stayed at, I highly recommend a visit if you ever get the chance. I now have only a short trip in the future to achieve and complete a small ambition of mine, which is to have driven the entire coast of California and Oregon: Los Angeles to San…
  • California sunset

    15 Dec 2013 | 1:30 am
     It's been almost a year since I last posted anything here. Sorry about that. The reasons are both personal and professional and I'm not up to updating anyone on either of those right now. But I did want to share an amazing sunset both Pam and I saw a week or so before Thanksgiving.This was a sunset seen from Carpinteria Beach. Apparently it's the safest beach in America, or something like along those lines.I felt very safe, especially as I wasn't in the water and I didn't see any muggers or assassins near me. Lots of people were there that evening because the sunset the previous evening…
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    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • New Comet: C/2014 Q3 (BORISOV)

    Team
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:24 am
    Cbet nr. 3936, issued on 2014, August 24, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~17) by G. Borisov (Observatory MARGO, Nauchnij) on CCD images obtained with a 0.3-m f/1.5 astrograph telescope on 2014, August 22.02. The new comet has been designated C/2014 Q3 (BORISOV).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, August 23.4 from H06 (iTelescope network - Mayhill) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, shows that this object is a comet: coma about…
  • Rosetta has arrived at comet 67P!

    Team
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:26 am
    After an epic 10-year journey, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived today August 06, 2014 at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko becoming the first spacecraft to rendezvous with a comet.  Launched in March 2004, Rosetta had to make three gravity-assist flybys of Earth and one of Mars to help it on course to its rendezvous with the comet. This complex course also allowed Rosetta to pass by asteroids Šteins and Lutetia, obtaining unprecedented views and scientific data on these two objects. Rosetta woke up from deep space hibernation on 20 January 2014, nine million…
  • New Comet: C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE)

    Team
    13 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Cbet nr. 3921, issued on 2014, July 13, announces the discovery of a comet (~ magnitude 17) by the  Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (or NEOWISE; formerly the WISE satellite) team on images taken with the NEOWISE satellite on 2014, July 04.5. The new comet has been designated C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, July 09.6 from Q62 (iTelescope network - Siding Spring) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + focal reducer,…
  • Close Approach of PHA Asteroid 2014 MF6

    Team
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:27 am
    The asteroid 2014 MF6 was discovered (at magnitude ~17.0) on 2014, June 23.3 by Catalina Sky Survey (MPC code 703) with a 0.68-m Schmidt + CCD. According to the preliminay orbit, 2014 MF6 is an Apollo type asteroid. This class of asteroids are defined by having semi-major axes greater than that of the Earth (> 1 AU) but perihelion distances less than the Earth's aphelion distance (q < 1.017 AU). It is also flagged as a "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid". PHA are asteroids larger than approximately 100m that might have threatening close approaches to the Earth (they can come closer to…
  • New Comet: P/2014 L2 (NEOWISE)

    Team
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    Cbet nr. 3901, issued on 2014, June 15, announces the discovery of a comet (~ magnitude 16.5) by the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) team on images taken with the NEOWISE satellite on 2014, June 07.4. The new comet has been designated P/2014 L2 (NEOWISE).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 12 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, June 15.4 from H06 (iTelescope network, New Mexico) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, shows that this object is a comet…
 
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    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • Engineers Conduct Low Light Test on New Technology for James Webb Space Telescope

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 3:34 pm
    NASA engineers have recently inspected a new piece of technology developed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Micro-Shutter Array (MSA), with a low light test at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Developed at Goddard to allow Webb's Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) to obtain spectra of more than 100 objects in the universe simultaneously, MSA uses thousands of tiny shutters to capture spectra from selected objects of interest in space and block out light from all other sources. The array is composed of four independent quadrants, each one housing a…
  • The Analysis of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:35 pm
    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a periodic comet in our solar system and was discovered by Klim Churyumov Ivanovic in 1969 at the Institute of Astrophysics of Alma-Ata, using a photo taken by Svetlana Ivanovna Gerasimenko that was subsequently analyzed. This celestial body has become an object of study for the European Space Agency's (ESA) Rosetta spacecraft, which was launched March 2, 2004 and came to the comet at a distance of only 100 km on August 6, 2014. With the use of the first images published by ESA and with the definition by the entity of the parameters of scale relative into the…
  • Alpbach Summer School Produces Venus Mission Concepts

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Mission concepts to study why Earth and Venus are so similar yet so different have been chosen for further study by the European Space Agency. No big thing for a space agency you might think. But what’s special about these concepts is that they have been designed by teams of students, and newly qualified young scientists and engineers. Every year since 1975, selected students have gathered for the Summer School Alpbach, situated in the beautiful Austrian Tyrol. The event has become a fixture on the European science training calendar. The Summer School is organised by FFG and co-sponsored by…
  • Dawn Spacecraft Will Get the Low-Down on the Dwarf Planet Ceres

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:53 pm
    As NASA’s Dawn spacecraft makes its journey to its second target, the dwarf planet Ceres, Marc Rayman, Dawn’s chief engineer, shared a monthly update on the mission’s progress. "The spacecraft is continuing to climb outward from the sun atop a blue-green beam of xenon ions from its uniquely efficient ion propulsion system. The constant, gentle thrust is reshaping its solar orbit so that by March 2015, it will arrive at the first dwarf planet ever discovered." Rayman wrote in a blog post. "Once in orbit, it will undertake an ambitious exploration of the exotic world of ice and rock that…
  • NASA Invites Public to Submit Messages for Asteroid Mission Time Capsule

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    2 Sep 2014 | 11:18 am
    NASA is inviting the worldwide public to submit short messages and images on social media that could be placed in a time capsule aboard a spacecraft launching to an asteroid in 2016. Called the Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx), the spacecraft will rendezvous with the asteroid Bennu in 2019, collect a sample and return the cache in a capsule to Earth in 2023 for detailed study. The robotic mission will spend more than two years at the 1,760-foot (500-meter)-wide asteroid and return a minimum of 2 ounces (60 grams) of its surface…
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