Astronomy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Searching for Extragalactic Supernovae

    Insight Observatory
    Michael Petrasko
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:33 am
    "Grus Quartet" - Imaged by Michael Petrasko and Muir Evenden of Insight Observatory.Just a few weeks ago I was down and out with one of those annoying summer colds. Having no energy to do anything, laying there next to my plethora of cold remedies, I started reminiscing about the days when fellow astronomer, Dale Alan Bryant and I would go out night after night visually hunting for extragalactic supernovae. Of course while reliving those fond memories, I couldn't help but dwell on the night we independently discovered the extragalactic supernova in the spiral galaxy M66 in the constellation…
  • How to connect multiple RSS feeds in to one

    Nerdynaut - Cyber
    27 Apr 2015 | 10:52 pm
    In this article we are going to guide to merge or mix multiple individual RSS feeds updates in to one place. This service will make easier to update your brain with new information.   RSS (Rich Site Summary)Blogs, email newsletters, NEWS-Related sites and many more online publishers syndicate their web content as a RSS feed. This service will give opportunity to stay informed the latest content of those publishers for people who regularly use the web.connecting multiple RSS feeds in to oneStep 1 :- Collect the RSS feed Address of your favorite publishers. (A few RSS feeds of…
  • Opportunity Readies for Winter

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:41 am
    This will be Opportunity’s seventh winter on Mars since landing in 2004 and it will be doing science by looking at outcrops that contain clay materials. The winter and study location is called Marathon Valley, “a notch in the raised rim of Endeavour crater. The Marathon Valley is advantageous because of a sun-facing slope. The valley is about 300 meters long, plenty to keep Oppy busy for a while. The shortest day of year on Mars will come in January. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech by
  • NASA Tests Orion’s Fate During Parachute Failure Scenario

    Universe Today
    Ken Kremer
    30 Aug 2015 | 12:22 pm
    A test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft successfully landed under two main parachutes in the Arizona desert Aug. 26, 2015 at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground. Credit: NASA What would happen to the astronaut crews aboard NASA’s Orion deep space capsule in the event of parachute failures in the final moments before splashdown upon returning from weeks to years long forays to the Moon, Asteroids or Mars? NASA teams are evaluating Orion’s fate under multiple scenarios in case certain of(...)Read the rest of NASA Tests Orion’s Fate During Parachute Failure Scenario (785…
  • The Return of The Bride of the Son of the Zombie Mars Hoax that will not Die

    Astroblog
    26 Aug 2015 | 10:04 pm
    Early morning sky on Saturday August 29 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 6:30 ACST showing Mars and Venus just above the horizon.  Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).Here we are again! The Mars hoax is circulating once more. No, Mars will not be as big as the full Moon, there will be no double Moon in the sky. In fact, Mars is far from opposition and is quite small (it won't be at opposition again until 22 May, 2016 nearly 8 months).However, on August 27, in the early morning Mars, Venus and Procyon form a nice…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy News

  • Opportunity Readies for Winter

    Tom
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:41 am
    This will be Opportunity’s seventh winter on Mars since landing in 2004 and it will be doing science by looking at outcrops that contain clay materials. The winter and study location is called Marathon Valley, “a notch in the raised rim of Endeavour crater. The Marathon Valley is advantageous because of a sun-facing slope. The valley is about 300 meters long, plenty to keep Oppy busy for a while. The shortest day of year on Mars will come in January. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech by
  • 2014 MU69 is PT1

    Tom
    30 Aug 2015 | 10:05 pm
    PT1? Yes PT1 is a designation given to the first potential target for the New Horizon’s spacecraft. 2014 MU69 is the first named potential target. Potential is the key word as there is at least one other identified candidate but not yet declared PT2. As for 2014 MU69 is has a diameter of just (about) 45 km / 30 miles in diameter! If this object is selected, New Horizons will not arrive until January 2019! It’s amazing this thing was even found, leave it Hubble Space Telescope to bring home the goods. The object was one of five found by Hubble and is one of two in the flight path…
  • Canadarm2 Grabs HTV-5

    Tom
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:59 am
    A nice image taken from the ISS showing Japan’s Kounotori 5 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-5)a grappled by the International Space Station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2. In 2013 during his stay aboard the ISS, Expedition 34 crew member and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield made a video showing us the Canadaarm 2 controls and a bit about how they work. Video Images: NASA / JAXA by
  • The Pluto System

    Tom
    29 Aug 2015 | 3:24 am
    A quick look at the Pluto system from New Horizons as it zoomed past. There is more in the way of data and images on the way from New Horizons. Data is coming in all the time, slowly. Video by
  • Impressions of Baikonur

    Tom
    29 Aug 2015 | 2:59 am
    Impressions of Baikonur from a tourist perspective. What a great place to visit! I’m not likely to ever go there but it would be a trip of a lifetime! Video by
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Universe Today

  • NASA Tests Orion’s Fate During Parachute Failure Scenario

    Ken Kremer
    30 Aug 2015 | 12:22 pm
    A test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft successfully landed under two main parachutes in the Arizona desert Aug. 26, 2015 at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground. Credit: NASA What would happen to the astronaut crews aboard NASA’s Orion deep space capsule in the event of parachute failures in the final moments before splashdown upon returning from weeks to years long forays to the Moon, Asteroids or Mars? NASA teams are evaluating Orion’s fate under multiple scenarios in case certain of(...)Read the rest of NASA Tests Orion’s Fate During Parachute Failure Scenario (785…
  • Eclipse By Fire! Smoky Haze Pervades Night Sky, Darkens Moon

    Bob King
    30 Aug 2015 | 9:15 am
    The Full Moon at 10:30 p.m. last night (Aug. 29). Even at 25 degrees altitude, it glowed a deep, dark orange caused by heavy smoke from western forest fires. Credit: Bob King Did you see the Moon last night? I walked outside at 10:30 p.m. and was stunned to see a dark, burnt-orange Full Moon as if September’s eclipse had arrived a month early. Why? Heavy smoke from forest fires in Washington, California and Montana has now spread to cover nearly half the country in a smoky pall, soaking up starlight and muting the moonlight. If this is what global warming has in store for us,…
  • Watch Where You Point That ‘Scope: Police Mistake Telescope for a Gun

    Nancy Atkinson
    29 Aug 2015 | 11:02 am
    Levi Joraanstad, a student at North Dakota State University displays his telescope, which police mistook for a rifle. Image via WDAY TV, Fargo, North Dakota. One more thing amateur astronomers might need to worry about besides clouds, bugs, and trying to fix equipment malfunctions in the dark – and this one’s a little more serious. (...)Read the rest of Watch Where You Point That ‘Scope: Police Mistake Telescope for a Gun (496 words) © nancy for Universe Today, 2015. | Permalink | 17 comments | Post tags: amateur astronomy, Telescopes Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • NASA and New Horizons team pick post-Pluto target … and serve up an awesome video

    Alan Boyle
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:34 pm
    An artist’s conception shows the New Horizons spacecraft flying past a Pluto-like object in the Kuiper Belt, the ring of icy material that lies billions of miles away from the sun. (Credit: Alex Parker / NASA / JHUAPL / SwRI) NASA and the science team behind the New Horizons mission to Pluto and beyond have settled on the popular choice for the spacecraft’s next flyby: It’s 2014 MU69, an icy object a billion miles beyond Pluto that’s thought to be less than 30 miles (45 kilometers) wide. (...)Read the rest of NASA and New Horizons team pick post-Pluto target … and…
  • August Full Moon Anticipates September’s Total Lunar Eclipse

    Bob King
    28 Aug 2015 | 8:35 am
    A Full Moon in all its horizontal glory. When near the horizon, refraction squeezes the lunar disk into an oval. Scattering removes the shorter wavelengths of white light, coloring the Moon a rich red or orange. Credit: Bob King Who doesn’t love a Full Moon? Occurring about once a month, they never wear out their welcome. Each one becomes a special event to anticipate. In the summer months, when the Moon rises through the sultry haze, atmosphere and aerosols scatter away so much blue light and green light from its disk, the Moon glows an enticing orange or red.(...)Read the rest of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astroblog

  • The Return of The Bride of the Son of the Zombie Mars Hoax that will not Die

    26 Aug 2015 | 10:04 pm
    Early morning sky on Saturday August 29 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 6:30 ACST showing Mars and Venus just above the horizon.  Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).Here we are again! The Mars hoax is circulating once more. No, Mars will not be as big as the full Moon, there will be no double Moon in the sky. In fact, Mars is far from opposition and is quite small (it won't be at opposition again until 22 May, 2016 nearly 8 months).However, on August 27, in the early morning Mars, Venus and Procyon form a nice…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 27 to Thursday September 3

    25 Aug 2015 | 6:21 am
    The Full Moon is Sunday August 30. Jupiter is lost in the twilight. Mercury rises higher in the evening twilight. Saturn is near the head of the Scorpion. Mars is visible low in the morning twilight. Venus climbs higher in the morning twilight. The Full Moon is Sunday August 30. The Moon is at perigee, when it is closest to Earth, on the 31st.Early evening sky on Saturday August 29 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 ACST showing Mercury. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen). Mercury climbs higher into the evening…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 20 to Thursday August 27

    18 Aug 2015 | 5:55 am
    The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday August 23. Jupiter is lost in the twilight. Mercury rises higher in the evening twilight. Saturn is near the head of the Scorpion and is visited by the waxing Moon on the 22nd. Mars is visible low in the morning twilight and is near the Beehive cluster on the 20th and 21st. Venus reappears low in the morning twilight near Mars. The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday August 23.Early evening sky on Saturday August 22 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 ACST showing Mercury.Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time.
  • Aurora Watch Tonight (Sunday 16 August 2015)

    16 Aug 2015 | 1:32 am
    UPDATE: 7:00 pmConfirmed aurora from Batemans bay and Bicheno Tas just now. Not clear if unaided eye or camera only. Seems to be sporadic, flaring up and dying down.  The Australian IPS has just issued an aurora alert for high latitudes BUT despite a good southward magnetic field -8 nT the Launceston  Kindex is 5 and the NOAA site a G2 storm current (and a G1 storm predicted later). I leave it up to you folks to decide if it is worthwhile.Currently, the Kindex is 5. Velocity: 534 km/sec Bz: -5.0 nT Density = 4.0 p/ccDark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and always…
  • Aurora visible NOW (15 August)

    15 Aug 2015 | 5:43 am
    Aurora are Happening NOW. Unaided eye Aurora and beams have been reported in Tasmania, from a wide variety of locations, Inverlock Victoria and some faint camera only colour in South Australia.UPDATE 10:33: Still ongoing in Tassie, camera only colour at Mornington Vic  with fog (colour from Melbourne's western suburbs at 10 pm AEST), unaided eye visible at Rickettes Point Vic. The IPS has just issued and Aurora Alert (well after people were seeing them)UPDATE 11:16: Still ongoing Tassie, Bacchus Marsh Victoria and South Australia (south of Port Lincoln). An Aurora Alert and a geomagnetic…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Hogg's Research

  • end of the summer

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Today was my last full day at MPIA for 2015. Ness and I worked on her age paper, and made the list of final items that need to be completed before the paper can be submitted, first to the SDSS-IV Collaboration, and then to the journal. I also figured out a bunch of baby steps I can do on my own paper with the age catalog.
  • reionization

    27 Aug 2015 | 8:59 pm
    At MPIA Galaxy Coffee, K. G. Lee (MPIA) and Jose Oñorbe (MPIA) gave talks about the intergalactic medium. Lee spoke about reconstruction of the density field, and Oñorbe spoke about reionization. The conversations continued into lunch, where I spoke with the research group of Joe Hennawi (MPIA) about various problems in inferring things about the intergalactic medium and quasar spectra in situations where (a) it is easy to simulate the data but (b) there is no explicit likelihood function. I advocated likelihood-free inference or ABC (as it is often called), plus adaptive…
  • dust structures, code audit

    26 Aug 2015 | 8:59 pm
    At Milky Way group meeting, Eddie Schlafly (MPIA) showed beautiful results (combining PanSTARRS, APOGEE, 2MASS, and WISE data) on the dust extinction law in the Milky Way. He can see that some of the nearby dust structures have anomalous RV values (dust extinction law shapes). Some of these are previously unknown features; they only appear when you have maps of density and RV at the same time. Maybe he gets to name these new structures!Late in the day, Ness and I audited her code that infers red-giant masses from APOGEE spectra. We found some issues with sigmas and variances and inverse…
  • color maps, stellar ages, stellar multiples

    25 Aug 2015 | 8:59 pm
    At breakfast I told Morgan Fouesneau (MPIA) my desiderata for a set of matplotlib color maps: I want a map that indicates intensity (dark to bright, say), a map that indicates a sequential value (mass or metallicty or age, say), a map that indicates residuals away from zero that de-emphasizes the near-zero values, and a map that is the same but that emphasizes the near-zero values. I want the diverging maps to never hit pure white or pure black (indeed none of these maps should) because we always want to distinguish values from “no data”. And I want them to be good for people with…
  • visualization, delta functions, interpretability

    24 Aug 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Late in the day, Rix, Ness, and I showed Ben Weiner (Arizona) the figures we have made for our paper on inferring red-giant masses and ages from APOGEE spectroscopy. He helped us think about changes we might make to the figures to bolster and make more clear the arguments.I spent some of the day manipulating delta functions and mixtures of delta functions for my attempt to infer the star-formation history of the Milky Way. I learned (for the Nth time) that it is better to manipulate Gaussians than delta functions; delta functions are way too freaky! And, once again, thinking about things…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • Discovering Dust-Obscured Active Galaxies as They Grow

    30 Aug 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Figure 1: Images of 3 DOG's. The left, middle, and right panels show optical image from HSC, near-infrared image from VIKING, and mid-infrared image from WISE, respectively. The image size is 20 square arcsecond (1 arcsecond is 1/3600 degree). It is clear that DOGs are faint in the optical, but are extremely bright in the infrared. (Credit: Ehime University/NAOJ/NASA/ESO)  Figure 2: The number density of DOGs that were newly selected in this study, as a function of infrared luminosity. Data represented by the red star is the HSC result. The research team found that (i) their infrared…
  • Hubble Finds That the Nearest Quasar Is Powered by a Double Black Hole Artist's View of a Binary Black Hole

    27 Aug 2015 | 8:10 pm
    Artist's View of a Binary Black HoleCredit: NASA ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI Release Images Optical-to-Ultraviolet Spectrum of Markarian 231This simplified spectral plot shows the radiation emitted from the center of a nearby galaxy that hosts a quasar. Visible and infrared light coming from a disk surrounding a central black hole in the middle of the galaxy is measured. Surprisingly, ultraviolet light from the disk, as measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows a drop in radiation from the disk. This is evidence for a large gap in the center of the disk that is likely carved out by a…
  • A youthful cluster

    27 Aug 2015 | 8:00 pm
    NGC 1783Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASAAcknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (geckzilla.comShown here in a new image taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is the globular cluster NGC 1783. This is one of the biggest globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, in the southern hemisphere constellation of Dorado.First observed by John Herschel in 1835, NGC 1783 is nearly 160 000 light-years from Earth, and has a mass around 170 000 times that of the Sun.Globular clusters are dense…
  • Abell 1033: Chandra Data Suggest Giant Collision Triggered "Radio Phoenix"

    26 Aug 2015 | 8:00 pm
     Abell 1033Credit  X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Hamburg/F. de Gasperin et al; Optical: SDSS; Radio: NRAO/VLA JPEG (574.7 kb) Large JPEG (5.6 MB) Tiff (16.5 MB) More Images View on the Sky (WWT) A Tour of NGC 5813  Astronomers have found evidence for a faded electron cloud "coming back to life," much like the mythical phoenix, after two galaxy clusters collided. This "radio phoenix," so-called because the high-energy electrons radiate primarily at radio frequencies, is found in Abell 1033. The system is located about 1.6 billion light years from Earth. By combining data…
  • The night sky around the Twin Jet Nebula (ground-based image)

    26 Aug 2015 | 9:42 am
    PR Image heic1518aThe Twin Jet Nebula PR Image heic1518bThe night sky around the Twin Jet Nebula (ground-based image) Videos PR Video heic1518aHubblecast 86: The wings of the Twin Jet Nebula PR Video heic1518bZooming in on the Twin Jet Nebula PR Video heic1518cPanning across the Twin Jet Nebula The shimmering colours visible in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image show off the remarkable complexity of the Twin Jet Nebula. The new image highlights the nebula’s shells and its knots of expanding gas in striking detail. Two iridescent lobes of material stretch outwards from a central star…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Urban Astronomer

  • Get Involved: Star Parties in the Bay Area

    19 Aug 2015 | 11:04 pm
    Get out and see the night sky in the company of other interested people and with amateur astronomers. That is my advice for those who say "I'd love to get out from time to time and look through a telescope at the heavens."There are plenty of opportunities, starting here in San Francisco with the SFAA (San Francisco Amateur Astronomers). We have two upcoming events, Saturday August 22nd on Mt. Tamalpais and Tuesday August 25th in the Presidio. More information on the SFAA Website.There are weekly star gazing opportunities every clear Friday and Saturday evening at Chabot Observatory in…
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2015 - August 11-12-13

    8 Aug 2015 | 9:20 am
    August means warm nights and the return of one of the year's best meteor showers, the Perseids. This shower peaks on the night of August 12-13 but takes place over a number of days before and after, so start looking up each night and you'll begin to spot more and more. The best nights are August 11, 12 and 13, even more favorable in 2015 due to the lack of moonlight this year.A Perseid MeteorTo see a meteor shower you don't need to look in any particular direction but up. Meteors enter the Earth's atmosphere and heat up and become visible to us in every direction of the sky, so your chances…
  • Southern Summer Skies

    21 Jul 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Facing South in the SummerFacing south in the summer reveals a rich region of the night sky featuring the heart of the Milky Way and several excellent zodiac constellations. If you have a clear horizon to the south, the constellation Scorpius dominates the space with a long curving shape that winds around the horizon back to the tip of the tail of the scorpion, a feature called the Cat's Eyes, Shaula and Lesath.For the next few months, Saturn is lurking next to the head of the scorpion, adding a bright highlight to the pattern. Scorpius and neighboring Sagittarius (to the east) are found…
  • Pluto and New Horizons

    13 Jul 2015 | 3:47 am
    As an amateur astronomer, Pluto is a tantalizing target to find, but one that is quite out of reach for all except the most committed amateur astronomers with the best possible equipment. And even if you locate it in a telescope it will be an extremely faint pinprick of light. So it has never entered my interest until this week. Instead of viewing it from a distance, humanity has finally launched a probe to fly by the planet (ok, dwarf planet) and offer up a close-up during its close passage.Almost 10 years after launching, New Horizons arrives at Pluto this week. The initial pictures are…
  • The Great Conjunction

    29 Jun 2015 | 10:50 pm
    The Great ConjunctionWhen the two brightest celestial objects in the night sky (excepting the Moon) pass next to each other, this is a grand event on an astronomical scale. Jupiter and Venus are doing just that, passing less than a Moon's diameter from each other in a great conjunction, peaking on Tuesday June 30th. A casual spectator should have no trouble seeing the pair, particularly after the glare of sunset subsides (around 9:00 pm or later on the west coast of the USA).Enjoy this rare and beautiful pairing, made more special by the fact that it's the Queen of Love and the King of the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    sci.astro

  • Re: EINSTEIN'S SCIENCE: NOT EVEN INSANE

    31 Aug 2015 | 6:58 am
    http://books.google.com/books?id=JokgnS1JtmMC Banesh Hoffmann, Relativity and Its Roots, p. 106: "The effect is mutual. Each of us finds the other's lengths in the direction of our relative motion contracted. When FitzGerald and Lorentz and Poincaré spoke of a contraction, they thought of it as
  • Re: EINSTEIN'S SCIENCE: NOT EVEN INSANE

    30 Aug 2015 | 12:34 pm
    If, in order for Divine Albert's Divine Theory to remain true, a rivet shank length should increase beyond the proper length, it does increase beyond the proper length: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/Relativ/bugrivet.html "In an attempt to squash a bug in a 1 cm deep hole, a rivet
  • Re: EINSTEIN'S SCIENCE: NOT EVEN INSANE

    30 Aug 2015 | 9:55 am
    Kip Thorne teaches that in 1905 Einstein disproved... Newton's law of gravity, and that Newton's law predicted... no deflection of light: http://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3169&context=space-congress-proceedings Kip Thorne: "Despite its great successes, Newton's law of gravity
  • Re: TWIN PARADOX: EINSTEIN'S 1918 PAPER

    30 Aug 2015 | 8:13 am
    There are two popular truths in Einstein's schizophrenic world: 1. The youthfulness of the travelling twin is due to the turning-around acceleration. 2. The youthfulness of the travelling twin is not due to the turning-around acceleration. Einstein discovered that, when teaching both truths
  • Re: TIME IN QUANTUM MECHANICS AND GENERAL RELATIVITY

    30 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/blogs/physics/2012/11/whos-on-first-relativity-time-and-quantum-theory/ Frank Wilczek: "Einstein's special theory of relativity calls for radical renovation of common-sense ideas about time. Different observers, moving at constant velocity relative to one another,
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    StarDate

  • Neptune at Opposition II

    damonddb
    30 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    We’re at the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season right now — more hurricanes form around the first of September than at any other time. Their winds can top out at 100 to 150 miles per hour — strong enough to cause massive damage. Yet compared to winds on the planet Neptune, the strongest hurricane ever measured is like a summer breeze. Winds on the solar system’s most-distant major planet have been clocked at up to 1300 miles per hour — fast enough to sweep from Los Angeles to New York in just a couple of hours. No one is certain why Neptune’s winds are so fast. A study a couple…
  • Neptune at Opposition

    damonddb
    29 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Big chunks of ice float atop Earth’s oceans: icebergs. Bergs may float inside the giant planet Neptune as well, made of a different kind of “ice”: diamond. Neptune is the fourth-largest planet in the solar system — it’s about four times the diameter of Earth. Its outer layers consist mainly of hydrogen and helium. Thousands of miles down, though, the composition changes to a mixture of ices — water, ammonia, and methane. Laboratory experiments suggest that under the extreme temperatures and pressures at those depths, the methane may break apart into its component molecules,…
  • Hunting Planets IV

    damonddb
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Hunting for exoplanets can take some patience. Astronomers at McDonald Observatory, for example, have been hunting for planets around a set of 200 target stars for more than 15 years. Yet the search isn’t over. Michael Endl is the project’s lead scientist: ENDL: It seems like it should be obvious that, after so many years of observing, we should know which star has a planet or doesn’t. We’re searching now for planets that have orbital periods of a decade or more. Such a planet is big and heavy, but it’s far away from its star. The planet’s gravitational pull causes a change in the…
  • Hunting Planets III

    damonddb
    27 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    It’s been only a couple of decades since astronomers discovered the first planets in other star systems. Yet they’re starting to figure out not just what some of those systems look like today, but what they might have looked like in the distant past. Astronomers are using the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory to hunt for exoplanetsOne of the keys is a class of planets known as “cold Jupiters.” They’re roughly the same size and mass as Jupiter, the giant of our solar system, and about the same distance from their parent star. Many of the planets discovered so far are…
  • Hunting Planets II

    damonddb
    26 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    MICHAEL ENDL: We are in the control room of the Harlan J. Smith 2.7-meter telescope at McDonald Observatory. And we are here because I have an observing run — four nights to use the telescope to search for extrasolar planets. Michael Endl is continuing a search that’s been going on for a decade and a half. A score of McDonald Observatory astronomers and students have used the same telescope and spectrograph that Endl is using to keep a sharp eye on about 200 stars. They’re looking for planets in orbit around those stars — especially worlds that are similar to Jupiter in our own solar…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • New Comet: C/2015 P3 (SWAN)

    Team
    11 Aug 2015 | 12:56 am
    CBET nr. 4136, issued on 2015, August 11, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~11) by M. Mattiazzo on low-resolution public website hydrogen Lyman-alpha images obtained during Aug. 3 and 4 with the Solar Wind Anisotropies (SWAN) camera on the Solar and Heliospheric Observer (SOHO) spacecraft. The new comet has been designated C/2015 P3 (SWAN).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 13 unfiltered exposures, 15-sec each, obtained remotely on 2015, August 10.4 from Q62 (iTelescope network - Siding Spring) through a 0.50-m f/6.8…
  • New Horizons’ Pluto flyby on 14 July

    Team
    13 Jul 2015 | 5:56 am
    After a 9½ years journey, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will visit tomorrow 14 July 2015 the dwarf planet Pluto. This will be the first ever flyby of Pluto and its largest moon Charon.During the fly-by (a 24-hour event), New Horizons will collect photographs and scientific data on Pluto’s surface, atmosphere and environment. New Horizons is intended to pass within 12,500 km (7,800 miles) of Pluto, with this closest approach date estimated to occur on July 14, 2015 at 11:50 UTC. New Horizons will have a relative velocity of 13.78 km/s (49,600 km/h; 30,800 mph) at its closest approach,…
  • Amor Asteroid (2015 KQ154)

    Team
    1 Jun 2015 | 6:16 am
    The MPEC 2015-K126 issued on May 28, 2015 announced the discovery of a new Amor-type asteroid officially designated 2015 KQ154. This asteroid (~ magnitude 16) was discovered by C. Jacques, E. Pimentel & J. Barros through a 0.28-m f/2.2 astrograph + CCD telescope of SONEAR Observatory (MPC code Y00), on images obtained on May 25.1, 2015. According to the preliminay orbit, 2015 KQ154 is an Amor type asteroid. Amor asteroids are a group of Near-Earth objects with orbits similar to that of 1221 Amor (1.017 AU < q < 1.3 AU). They approach the orbit of Earth from beyond, but do not…
  • New Comet: C/2015 K4 (PANSTARRS)

    Team
    27 May 2015 | 12:43 am
    CBET nr. 4108, issued on 2015, May 27, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18) by PANSTARRS survey in three w-band exposures taken with the 1.8-m Pan-STARRS1 telescope at Haleakala on May 24.5 UT. The new comet has been designated C/2015 K4 (PANSTARRS).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 20 unfiltered exposures, 30-sec each, obtained remotely on 2015, May 26.3 from U69 (iTelescope network - Auberry California) through a 0.61-m f/6.5 astrograph + CCD, shows that this object is a comet with a ill-defined central…
  • New Comet: C/2015 G2 (MASTER)

    Team
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:04 pm
    CBET nr. 4092, issued on 2015, April 10, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~11) on R-band images taken by P. Balanutsa et al. with the MASTER (Mobile Astronomical System of the Telescope-Robots) 0.4-m f/2.5 reflector at the South African Astronomical Observatory.  The new comet has been designated C/2015 G2 (MASTER).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 30-sec each, obtained remotely on 2015, April 08.8 from Q62 (iTelescope network - Siding Spring) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD +…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Brown SpaceMan

  • Beautiful Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    Zain Husain
    30 Aug 2015 | 10:55 am
    About 7,000 light years away from Earth lies the aftermath of a massive star that went supernova. In its wake we see gorgeous wispy interstellar gases spreading out in a non-uniform manner. The way this happened is a massive star (at least 8 times larger than our Sun) went through stellar death process (where it […] The post Beautiful Puppis A Supernova Remnant appeared first on Brown SpaceMan.
  • The Mystery on How Saturn and Jupiter were Formed

    Zain Husain
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:19 pm
    Saturn and Jupiter are one of the largest gaseous planets in our solar system that hold a plethora of excitement and mystery. One of the mysteries is how these planets actually formed. You may be thinking to yourself, “Is that really a big mystery to us?” And the answer is yes. Let me tell you […] The post The Mystery on How Saturn and Jupiter were Formed appeared first on Brown SpaceMan.
  • The Most Surprising Facts About the Perseid Meteor Shower

    Zain Husain
    13 Aug 2015 | 6:35 pm
    The Perseid meteor shower is one of the biggest spectacles of the year and even if you’re not into astronomy you have probably heard something about it. However, once I started digging in a little further the story got a little more interesting… Quick facts about the Perseids Meteor Shower: Comet of Origin: 109P/Swift-Tuttle Meteor Shower period: July 17 to […] The post The Most Surprising Facts About the Perseid Meteor Shower appeared first on Brown SpaceMan.
  • Carnival of Space 412: Best Space Stories of the Week!

    Zain Husain
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:17 pm
    Hello space fans and welcome to Carnival of Space 412! We have a ton of awesome content for you and without further adieu let’s jump in.     1. “One Month“ Dr. Schenk’s 3D House of Satellites shows us the excitement with Pluto’s mission called New Horizons. He’s even had some influence on the mission and it’s definitely […] The post Carnival of Space 412: Best Space Stories of the Week! appeared first on Brown SpaceMan.
  • 5 Awesome Things You May Not Know About Pluto

    Zain Husain
    21 Jun 2015 | 2:59 pm
    In the last decade Pluto has gone through a lot of controversy around whether it’s a planet or not. However, controversy aside there are some really cool discoveries happening in the just the last month or so. We’re going to take a look at my favorite 5 things about Pluto that you may not know about. […] The post 5 Awesome Things You May Not Know About Pluto appeared first on Brown SpaceMan.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • Russia Aims to Return to the Moon

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:04 pm
    Thirty-nine years ago, on Aug. 18, 1976, the Soviet Union successfully soft-landed its last spacecraft on the moon - Luna 24. For 37 years, until the lunar landing of Chinese Chang'e 3 probe in December 2013, it was also the last manmade object to soft-land on the moon’s surface. Now, the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) plans to continue the legacy of the successful Luna Program by reviving the idea of unmanned lunar landers.The Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) has recently revealed the details of the upcoming Luna 25 (also known as Luna-Glob lander) mission which is being…
  • Entranced by a Transit

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    31 Aug 2015 | 1:34 pm
    Saturn's moon Dione crosses the face of the giant planet in this view, a phenomenon astronomers call a transit. Transits play an important role in astronomy and can be used to study the orbits of planets and their atmospheres, both in our solar system and in others. By carefully timing and observing transits in the Saturn system, like that of Dione (698 miles or 1,123 kilometers across), scientists can more precisely determine the orbital parameters of Saturn’s moons.This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 0.3 degrees below the ring plane. The image was taken…
  • New Horizons Team Selects Potential Kuiper Belt Flyby Target

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    30 Aug 2015 | 3:29 pm
    NASA has selected the potential next destination for the New Horizons mission to visit after its historic July 14 flyby of the Pluto system. The destination is a small Kuiper Belt object (KBO) known as 2014 MU69 that orbits nearly a billion miles beyond Pluto. This remote KBO was one of two identified as potential destinations and the one recommended to NASA by the New Horizons team. Although NASA has selected 2014 MU69 as the target, as part of its normal review process the agency will conduct a detailed assessment before officially approving the mission extension to conduct additional…
  • China Launches its Yaogan 27 Satellite

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    30 Aug 2015 | 2:34 pm
    China launched its latest spy satellite into orbit on Thursday, Aug. 27 at 10:31 p.m. EDT (02:31 GMT) aboard a Long March 4C rocket from the country’s LC9 launch complex at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in northeastern China’s Shanxi province. Designated Yaogan 27, the spacecraft is described by Chinese media as a remote satellite that will be used for experiments, land surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster prevention. But the western analysts believe it will be used for military purposes.The satellite is a part of the Yaogan Weixing series and is believed to be a third…
  • Russian Reusable Spacecraft Ambitions Revived

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:31 am
    The Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, a Moscow-based rocket and spacecraft manufacturer, plans to revive the former Soviet Union’s winged spacecraft program, perhaps similar to the U.S.S.R’s shuttle known as Buran (Blizzard). Started in 1974, Buran was a Soviet reusable spacecraft project undertaken as a response to NASA’s Space Shuttle program.According to a report appearing on Sputnik News, the revived version of the project, called the Reusable Space Rocket System, or MRKS, will be financed from 2021 through 2025. It will be developed under the Russian Federal…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Telescope Observer

  • Celestron 52306 Regal M2 100ED Spotting Scope Review

    Telescope Review Guide
    24 Aug 2015 | 4:04 pm
    Celestron’s line of M2 spotting scopes offer consumers a way to enjoy higher-end optics from the company without paying exorbitant prices. The Regal 100ED brings all of the features of the other M2 scopes to the table but adds a lens diameter that offers greater light gathering abilities than either the 65 or 80mm versions.… Read more The post Celestron 52306 Regal M2 100ED Spotting Scope Review appeared first on Telescope Observer.
  • Tele Vue Ethos 13mm Telescope Eyepiece Review

    Telescope Review Guide
    6 Aug 2015 | 12:14 pm
    The Tele Vue 13mm Ethos is one of the largest eyepieces in Tele Vue’s Ethos line. This eyepiece was created to provide consumers with an exceptional field of view, solid eye relief, and minimal distortion. The result is a powerful eyepiece that provides versatility, clarity, and exceptional quality for amateur astronomers looking to upgrade their… Read more The post Tele Vue Ethos 13mm Telescope Eyepiece Review appeared first on Telescope Observer.
  • Review: Celestron Regal M2 65ED Spotting Scope (52304)

    Telescope Review Guide
    28 Jul 2015 | 3:10 pm
    The Regal 65ED from Celestron is one of the company’s line of M2 spotting scopes. These viewing instruments are some of Celestron’s higher-end offerings, promising superior optical capabilities and reliable construction for a price that is still affordable for consumers on a budget. Intended for long distance viewing, birding, target shooting, and some limited astronomy,… Read more The post Review: Celestron Regal M2 65ED Spotting Scope (52304) appeared first on Telescope Observer.
  • Review: Celestron Regal M2 80ED Spotting Scope (52305)

    Telescope Review Guide
    21 Jul 2015 | 5:38 am
    The Celestron Regal is one of the company’s higher-end spotting scopes. Designed for durability, performance, and affordability, it offers unique design features, such as an ED objective lens, and a lightweight yet sturdy construction. Its unique combination of high-end optics, high-quality construction, and low price will appeal to any serious nature viewer or target shooter.… Read more The post Review: Celestron Regal M2 80ED Spotting Scope (52305) appeared first on Telescope Observer.
  • Celestron 52252 Review: 100mm Ultima Zoom Spotting Scope

    Telescope Review Guide
    18 Jul 2015 | 8:43 am
    The Celestron Ultima Zoom spotting scope provides an appealing combination of value and performance for anyone wishing to enjoy nature views, go bird watching, or participate in target shooting. Designed to offer the best light gathering abilities of the Ultima line, it provides clear views and a high quality construction for a reasonable price. (click… Read more The post Celestron 52252 Review: 100mm Ultima Zoom Spotting Scope appeared first on Telescope Observer.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Insight Observatory

  • Searching for Extragalactic Supernovae

    Michael Petrasko
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:33 am
    "Grus Quartet" - Imaged by Michael Petrasko and Muir Evenden of Insight Observatory.Just a few weeks ago I was down and out with one of those annoying summer colds. Having no energy to do anything, laying there next to my plethora of cold remedies, I started reminiscing about the days when fellow astronomer, Dale Alan Bryant and I would go out night after night visually hunting for extragalactic supernovae. Of course while reliving those fond memories, I couldn't help but dwell on the night we independently discovered the extragalactic supernova in the spiral galaxy M66 in the constellation…
  • Twinkle, Twinkle, Little, Red Star

    Dale Alan Bryant
    22 Aug 2015 | 6:22 am
    Illustration of the Gliese 876 Planetary System.This is a COMSIM of the recently discovered planetary system, Gliese (GLEE-ZUH) 876, a red, type-M star with some similarities to the Sun (type-G), 15 light-years away, with three planets in orbit around it. It was discovered by the Kepler Mission Space Telescope.As can be seen, planets do not necessarily orbit their host stars in an orbital plane, perpendicular to the star's axis of rotation, in the way that the planets of our solar system do. This came as a bit of a surprise to me, when I found out that a high percentage of exo-planetary…
  • Prague Astronomical Clock

    Muir Evenden
    12 Aug 2015 | 6:10 am
    Prague Astronomical Clock.One of the nice things about living in Europe is the abundance of artifacts and places of astronomical interest...amidst all the culture and history you would expect to encounter traveling and visiting different cities and countries, one finds that they eventually run across a historical attraction which piques the interest for those of us who have a passion for astronomy. Today we visit the city of Prague (about an 8-hour train ride from my residence in Krakow Poland) and look at the Astronomical Clock in Prague. The Prague Astronomical Clock is built into the…
  • Checkbook Astronomy

    Harry Hammond
    3 Aug 2015 | 3:21 pm
    1990 Stellafane Convention - Springfield, Vermont.Held annually under the dark August skies of Springfield Vermont, a large gathering of amateur telescope makers unfolds on weekends chosen to coincide with the Perseid meteor shower. Called Stellafane, this “Shrine to the Stars” happening is attended by thousands of amateurs from around the world. They are all hoping get in some dark-sky observing, and to admire telescopes designed and fabricated by others. This is all conducted in a friendly outdoor-camping, "down home" atmosphere (which belies all the genius and mind-boggling technology…
  • Here Come the Perseids!

    Insight Observatory
    2 Aug 2015 | 9:07 am
    The 2015 Perseid meteor shower will peak around August 11. The new moon on August 14, 2015, will create perfect conditions for watching the meteor shower.Radiant of Perseid Meteor Shower.In the Northern Hemisphere, the annual Perseid meteor shower probably ranks as one of the best and most popular meteor shower of the year. This epic event takes place during the dog days of summer when many families are on vacation. As this time of year offers comfortable temperatures in during the overnight hours, this allows us to lay back under the stars for hours and enjoy this spectacular display of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nerdynaut - Cyber

  • Facebook Flat – The Modern Facebook Interface 

    29 Aug 2015 | 10:23 pm
    This Chrome extension can create new Facebook design, UX/UI, remove ads and make Facebook load faster.Facebook Flat is an amazing and free Google chrome browser extension.   Here are some features of it.Astonishing new design and interfaceRemoving all Facebook ads (similar to Adblock)Facebook works much faster than beforeVery useful left panel that allow quick access to main sectionsIncreased readability of the contentFollow this link and install it to your Google chrome browser. chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/facebook-flat/kadbillinepbjlgenaliokdhejdmmlgpAlso you can switch…
  • Nerdynaut SEO Meta Tag Template 2015 by ContributorX

    19 Aug 2015 | 1:17 pm
    Grab, edit and drop it to your website and make it social media friendly with a clean and complete meta tag collection. This code template is very simple. The dummies can also use this for their code works without getting much tired.  Meta tags are snippets of text that describe a page’s content. The meta tags don’t appear on the page itself, but only in the page’s code. These HTML tags help us to increase SEO rank of our websites on Search engines like Google, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex etc. Not only for that, but also these snippets helps make the web pages social…
  • Most Innovative jQuery plugins

    9 Aug 2015 | 5:39 am
    Here are some of the best jQuery plugins in the cyber which are handpicked by our team. What is jQueryjQuery is the most popular JavaScript  library in  this era. It’s so fast, free, easy and feature-rich stuff for web designers. jQuery is the best method to make  menus, navigation, sliders, galleries, forms, text effects and many more JavaScript works without playing a big role. The reason for that is jQuery is easing the JavaScript syntax. jQuery was originally released in January 2006 by its founding developer John Resig. Now it’s developing under an…
  • How to connect multiple RSS feeds in to one

    27 Apr 2015 | 10:52 pm
    In this article we are going to guide to merge or mix multiple individual RSS feeds updates in to one place. This service will make easier to update your brain with new information.   RSS (Rich Site Summary)Blogs, email newsletters, NEWS-Related sites and many more online publishers syndicate their web content as a RSS feed. This service will give opportunity to stay informed the latest content of those publishers for people who regularly use the web.connecting multiple RSS feeds in to oneStep 1 :- Collect the RSS feed Address of your favorite publishers. (A few RSS feeds of…
  • Get your site under your control with GetSiteControl

    24 Apr 2015 | 12:09 am
    GetSiteControl is a service that you can use for optimizing your website with its easy-to-use set of smart widgets. This service gives the opportunity for quickly add elements that engage website visitors and help to increase conversions. It’s easy to install and so easy to manage.  This service is owned by GetWebCraft Limited Company which registered in Cyprus. By using this service, you can add Survey, Contact, Promo, Subscribe, Follow, Share and Chat widget without spending money. Follow steps to install this service to your website.Step 1 :-  Go…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Space Facts

  • Triton Moon Facts

    Chris
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:41 am
    Triton is Neptune’s largest moon and is the only large moon in the solar system to orbit in the opposite direction to its planet’s rotation, this is known as a retrograde orbit. Moon Profile Diameter: 2706.8 km Mass: 2.14 x 10 ^ 22 lg Orbits: Neptune Average Distance from Neptune: 354,759 km Length of Orbit: -5.8 […] The post Triton Moon Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Miranda Moon Facts

    Chris
    17 Aug 2015 | 5:29 am
    Miranda is the smallest of the rounded satellites of Uranus. It also orbits the closest of the five larger moons. It is named after one of the characters in Shakespeares play, “The Tempest”. It was also featured in Arthur C. Clark’s novel “2001: A Space Odyssey”. Moon Profile Diameter: 470 km Mass: 6.6 x 10 […] The post Miranda Moon Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Titan Moon Facts

    Chris
    11 Aug 2015 | 6:13 am
    Titan is the largest moon in the Saturnian system and the second-largest moon in the solar system. If it were not orbiting Saturn, it might be considered a planet in its own right. It is covered with a thick atmosphere that some consider to be similar to that of early Earth. Moon Profile Diameter: 5,150 […] The post Titan Moon Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Enceladus Moon Facts

    Chris
    11 Aug 2015 | 6:08 am
    Enceladus is the sixth-largest moon of Saturn and, after Titan, one of the most-studied worlds in the system. It was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel and named after the Greek mythological giant Enceladus. Moon Profile Dimensions: 504 km Mass: 1.08 x 10 ^20 kg Orbits: Saturn Average Distance from Saturn: 237,948 km Length of […] The post Enceladus Moon Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Iapetus Moon Facts

    Chris
    11 Aug 2015 | 6:07 am
    Iapetus is an oddly-colored and shaped moon of Saturn. It is the third-largest moon in the system, and was discovered in 1671 by the astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini. Moon Profile Diameter: 1,469 km Mass: 1.8 x 10 ^ 21 kg Orbits: Saturn Average Distance from Saturn: 3,560,820 km Length of Orbit: 79.3 days Surface Temperature: […] The post Iapetus Moon Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
 
Log in