Astronomy

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  • Observing Summer Constellations

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The Milky Way and Vega by John Chumack On summer evenings as adults sit around bonfires and kids run in the yard playing flashlight tag, eyes turn skyward. Teach your friends and family the most important summer constellations with this handy guide on what star formations are overhead. Start with the easiest constellation just to orient yourself in the star-filled sky. The Big Dipper is neither a true constellation or a specifically summer constellation, but it will help you get started. The Big Dipper is easy to located in the northwest on summer evenings and is circumpolar, meaning that it…
  • Two Lobes of a Comet

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:19 pm
    Full-frame NAVCAM image taken on 18 August 2014 from a distance of about 84 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM The view of 67P/G-C or “the duck” as some are calling it. Rosetta was just 84 km away from the comet when this was taken.  Lobes, so much for comets to be nice round dirty snowballs.  Rosetta is redefining how a lot of us think about comets. I just marvel at how good  this really is. Rosetta is orbiting comet 67/G-c about 412,000,000 km (~256 million miles) away from Earth and 527,000,000 km (~327 million miles) from the Sun and the…
  • Curiosity Brushes ‘Bonanza King’ Target Anticipating Fourth Red Planet Rock Drilling

    Universe Today
    Ken Kremer
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:10 pm
    Curiosity brushes ‘Bonanza King’ drill target on Mars NASA’s Curiosity rover looks back to ramp with 4th drill site target at ‘Bonanza King’ rock outcrop in ‘Hidden Valley’ in this photo mosaic view captured on Aug. 6, 2014, Sol 711. Inset shows results of brushing on Aug. 17, Sol 722, that revealed gray patch beneath red dust. Note the rover’s partial selfie, valley walls, deep wheel tracks in the sand dunes and distant rim of Gale crater beyond the ramp. Navcam camera raw images stitched and colorized. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Ken Kremer-kenkremer.com/Marco Di…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 21 to Thursday August 28

    Astroblog
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:12 am
    The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. The Moon is close to Mercury on the 27th. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky are at their closest this week. Venus is low in the morning twilight while Jupiter rises higher. The Moon is close to Venus and Jupiter on the 23rd and 24th.The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. The Moon is at apogee (furthest from the Earth), on the 24th.  Evening sky on Monday August 25 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are at their closest under the head…
  • causal pixel modeling, day 4

    Hogg's Research
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Foreman-Mackey re-started exoplanet search (in Kepler) last night, and on the train home from Tübingen we looked at some of the early false positives. We realized that the way we are constructing the search leads to some non-trivial issues: For performance reasons, we slide a single "box" model across the lightcurve once, and then we do search by linking together likelihood increments from the one-d box slide in periodic groups. The issue is: When we slide the box, we permit the box to take any transit depth, so the system can link together in a periodic group a set of transit-like…
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    Astronomy Today

  • Observing Summer Constellations

    Kelly
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The Milky Way and Vega by John Chumack On summer evenings as adults sit around bonfires and kids run in the yard playing flashlight tag, eyes turn skyward. Teach your friends and family the most important summer constellations with this handy guide on what star formations are overhead. Start with the easiest constellation just to orient yourself in the star-filled sky. The Big Dipper is neither a true constellation or a specifically summer constellation, but it will help you get started. The Big Dipper is easy to located in the northwest on summer evenings and is circumpolar, meaning that it…
  • Crossing off the Bucket List: Zodiacal Light

    Kelly
    27 May 2014 | 12:11 pm
    The Zodiacal Light looks pyramidal shaped from horizon stretching upward. Credit: ESO/Y. Beletsky Amateur astronomers never really take a vacation from stargazing. And in fact, sometimes vacations provide for the best stargazing. Over spring break this year my family and I did a tour of the national parks, starting and ending our vacation in Las Vegas, one of the most light polluted locations on Earth. But McCarran International airport made for a good spot to begin our travels first to Utah’s national parks, then to Great Basin National Park in Nevada along the loneliest highway in…
  • Up for the Lunar Eclipse

    Kelly
    30 Apr 2014 | 6:14 am
    The Moon in Eclipse with Mars and Spica, April 2014 As a chronic insomniac, I didn’t feel the need to set my alarm for the April lunar eclipse. Just the night before I had been awake from 3:45 to 5:30, so I figured that there was a good chance that sometime within the window of the eclipse I would be awake. At my location, totality would last from 2:07 to 3:25 a.m. with partial phases for an hour on either side of that. Surely I would be awake for some of it. I was actually deep asleep around 2:15 a.m. when my phone buzzed beside me three times. Someone who follows my twitter feed was…
  • In Search of Noctilucent Clouds

    Kelly
    31 Mar 2014 | 6:13 am
    Noctilucent Clouds as seen by the ISS On a list of elusive observing targets, noctilucent clouds are one of the most challenging and one I have yet to spy. These clouds, also called polar mesospheric clouds or night-shining clouds, are found in the mesosphere, higher than all other clouds. Most clouds and weather on earth are confined to the troposphere, or layer of air closest to the ground. The mesosphere is located 80 kilometers above our planet’s surface. The mesosphere is a region that’s extremely cold and dry, and because of this, it is uncommon for clouds to form in an area that is…
  • The Importance of the Stars

    Kelly
    28 Feb 2014 | 7:04 am
    The stars around the nebula Thor’s Helmet, by John Chumack We spend the vast majority of our lives indoors. We’re at work, at school, or at home, with activities such as sleeping, watching TV, or having dinner with the family. This is especially true during the winter months when making the short sprint from a building to our cars can be a test of our endurance. Add to that the places most of us live. These restaurants, offices, industries, schools, and homes all cluster together in cities and suburbs. It is not often that we find ourselves away from the hubbub and associated light…
 
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    Astronomy News

  • Two Lobes of a Comet

    Tom
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:19 pm
    Full-frame NAVCAM image taken on 18 August 2014 from a distance of about 84 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM The view of 67P/G-C or “the duck” as some are calling it. Rosetta was just 84 km away from the comet when this was taken.  Lobes, so much for comets to be nice round dirty snowballs.  Rosetta is redefining how a lot of us think about comets. I just marvel at how good  this really is. Rosetta is orbiting comet 67/G-c about 412,000,000 km (~256 million miles) away from Earth and 527,000,000 km (~327 million miles) from the Sun and the…
  • Bonanza King

    Tom
    18 Aug 2014 | 8:40 pm
    A look from Curiosity’s NAVCAM, in the center Bonanza King. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech The Mars Science Laboratory – Curiosity, recently passed its second anniversary (in Earth years) on Mars. The rover is making its way to Mount Sharp. The base of Mount Sharp is about 3 km from Curiosity’s current location. The mission managers are using “softer” valleys to get there, the idea being to save on the wheel tread of the rover which readers here will know show a bit of wear. There is an update on the journey in the form of a video from JPL / NASA. In the video they…
  • Pluto the Movie

    Tom
    17 Aug 2014 | 8:32 pm
    Pluto and Charon from New Horizons. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute The New Horizons spacecraft captured this “movie” consisting of 12 images showing Pluto and the moon Charon. Those 12 images, taken between 19 and 24 July so almost one full orbit of Pluto and Charon, from 429 million to 422 million km / 267 million to 262 million miles using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI).  This set of images was taken with the New Horizons spacecraft 10 times closer to Pluto than we are here on Earth. Notice the wobble?
  • NASA Update

    Tom
    17 Aug 2014 | 5:35 am
    Rosetta has been eclipsing most of the news lately, as it should. NASA is also staying busy as always and the first data is coming in from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2. Part of the update is about the Cygnus spacecraft leaving the ISS laden with trash. The Cygnus is about to re-enter the atmosphere and will burn up. This should occur at 13:11 UTC / 0911 EDT, today (Sunday). The atmospheric interface will occur between New Zealand and South America and is timed so the ISS crew can observe the fiery demise of the spacecraft.
  • Rosetta Maps Comet

    Tom
    15 Aug 2014 | 7:24 pm
    Where the Philae lander this coming November is a very important decision. ESA naturally wants to land in the spot where they are going to get to learn the most possible. This is a great video for getting a feel for the mission and what it means: For additional languages and video source – click here
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    Universe Today

  • Curiosity Brushes ‘Bonanza King’ Target Anticipating Fourth Red Planet Rock Drilling

    Ken Kremer
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:10 pm
    Curiosity brushes ‘Bonanza King’ drill target on Mars NASA’s Curiosity rover looks back to ramp with 4th drill site target at ‘Bonanza King’ rock outcrop in ‘Hidden Valley’ in this photo mosaic view captured on Aug. 6, 2014, Sol 711. Inset shows results of brushing on Aug. 17, Sol 722, that revealed gray patch beneath red dust. Note the rover’s partial selfie, valley walls, deep wheel tracks in the sand dunes and distant rim of Gale crater beyond the ramp. Navcam camera raw images stitched and colorized. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Ken Kremer-kenkremer.com/Marco Di…
  • Australian Amateur Terry Lovejoy Discovers New Comet

    Bob King
    19 Aug 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The fuzzy object at center is new comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) discovered by Australian amateur astronomer Terry Lovejoy. Copyright Alain Maury and Joaquin Fabrega It’s confirmed! Australian amateur astronomer Terry Lovejoy just discovered his fifth comet, C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy). He found it August 17th using a Celestron C8 fitted with a CCD camera at his roll-off roof observatory in Brisbane, Australia. (...)Read the rest of Australian Amateur Terry Lovejoy Discovers New Comet (472 words) © Bob King for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | 6 comments | Post tags: C/2011 W3 Lovejoy,…
  • Feel The Beat: Black Hole’s Pulse Reveals Its Mysterious Size

    Elizabeth Howell
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:51 am
    There’s a bit of a mystery buried in the heart of the Cigar Galaxy, known more formally as M82 or Messier 82. Shining brightly in X-rays is a black hole (called M82 X-1) that straddles an unusual line between small and huge black holes, new research has revealed. The new study reveals for the first time just how big this black hole is — about 400 times the mass of the sun — after about a decade of struggling to figure this out. (...)Read the rest of Feel The Beat: Black Hole’s Pulse Reveals Its Mysterious Size (242 words) © Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. |…
  • This Martian Basin Shows Off Our Solar System’s Violent Past

    Elizabeth Howell
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:36 am
    A Mars Express image of craters in Hellas Basin, an impact basin on Mars that is one of the biggest in the solar system. Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin Did that impact 4.1 billion years ago ever leave a scar! Here, a Mars Express photo from late 2013 (and just highlighted now) shows off craters in Hellas Basin, which was formed when the planets in our young Solar System were under intense bombardment from leftover remnants. But over time, wind and erosion on Mars have changed the nature of this basin, the German Space Agency explained. (...)Read the rest of This Martian Basin Shows Off Our Solar…
  • Beam a Message to Mars and Support Space Research and Exploration

    Nancy Atkinson
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:15 am
    Uwingu’s latest fund-raising project is ‘Beam Me to Mars.’ Image courtesy Uwingu. A new project from Uwingu to help address funding shortages for researchers, scientists, educators and students allows people from Earth to give a global “shout?out” to planet Mars. The project is called “Beam Me to Mars,” and it celebrates the 50th anniversary of the launch of f NASA’s Mariner 4 mission, the first successful mission to Mars. “Nothing like this has ever been done,” Uwingu CEO Alan Stern told Universe Today. “It’s going to be a lot of fun, and, I think,…
 
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    Astroblog

  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 21 to Thursday August 28

    19 Aug 2014 | 6:12 am
    The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky. The Moon is close to Mercury on the 27th. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky are at their closest this week. Venus is low in the morning twilight while Jupiter rises higher. The Moon is close to Venus and Jupiter on the 23rd and 24th.The New Moon is Tuesday August 26. The Moon is at apogee (furthest from the Earth), on the 24th.  Evening sky on Monday August 25 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are at their closest under the head…
  • Mars and Saturn, Sunday 17 August, 2014

    18 Aug 2014 | 6:38 am
    Mars, Zubenelgenubi and Saturn almost from a line below the head of the Scorpion on Sunday 17 August (three brightest objects mid left, click to embiggen)t. 10 x 15 second exposures at ASA 400 with a "point and shoot" Canon IXUS, stacked in ImageJ, SUMMED an light contrast editing applied. While the conjunction of Venus and Jupiter was quite good, Mars and Saturn have been slowly approaching each other. They will be closest on the 25th but not as close as Jupiter and Venus were this morning).Mars, Zubenelgenubi and Saturn actually form a straight line tonight, but cloud got in the way.
  • Venus and Jupiter Close together in the Twilight Glow (morning, 18 August 2014)

    17 Aug 2014 | 3:43 am
    Morning sky on Monday August 18 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at civil twilight, 6:30 am ACST.  Venus is low above the horizon, Jupiter is so close it may be hard to see it separately. The inset shows the binocular view (click to embiggen)Morning sky on Monday August 18 looking north-east as seen from Brisbane at civil twilight, 5:22 am AEST.  (click to embiggen)Morning sky on Monday August 18 looking north-east as seen from Darwin  at civil twilight, 6:37 am ACST.  (click to embiggen)This Monday morning (18 August) Venus and Jupiter are less than half a…
  • Readers Images of the Occultation of Saturn, August 4 2014

    14 Aug 2014 | 5:36 am
    Christine Beswick from Tasmania took this "near miss" image. Hand held standing on the porch 1/40 ISO 320.Chris Wyatt took this image using an eyepiece projection of Moon at 29.8 magnification at ASA 400, 1/200 sec exposure on his 10" dob scope with a Canon 70DChris has imaged Saturn with no eyepiece at ASA 3200, 1/100 sec and focal length 3,890 mmChris imaged the Moon Occulting Saturn with  ASA 2,500 , 1/125 sec and focal length 3,890 mmReaders Rob and Julie Walpole and Chris Wyatt have sent in some great images of the occultation of Saturn on August 4. Rob and Julie sent along their…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday August 14 to Thursday August 21

    12 Aug 2014 | 5:32 am
    The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday August 17. Mercury returns to the evening sky late in the week. Mars and Saturn are prominent in the evening sky and come closer together during the week. Venus is low in the twilight and meets Jupiter on the 18th.The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday August 17.Evening sky on Thursday August 21 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 (10:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. Mars and Saturn are close together under the head of  Scorpius. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen). The inset shows the telescopic view…
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    Hogg's Research

  • causal pixel modeling, day 4

    15 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Foreman-Mackey re-started exoplanet search (in Kepler) last night, and on the train home from Tübingen we looked at some of the early false positives. We realized that the way we are constructing the search leads to some non-trivial issues: For performance reasons, we slide a single "box" model across the lightcurve once, and then we do search by linking together likelihood increments from the one-d box slide in periodic groups. The issue is: When we slide the box, we permit the box to take any transit depth, so the system can link together in a periodic group a set of transit-like…
  • causal pixel modeling, day 3

    14 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    After talking to Muandet (MPI-IS) and Lopez-Paz (MPI-IS) about false-positive classification using supervised methods yesterday, Foreman-Mackey sent them some lightcurve information from injected exoplanets and from some random locations, just to give them an idea of what to expect when we start a search for exoplanets in earnest. They classified like the wind. Meanwhile, Schölkopf, Foreman-Mackey, and I discussed the problem of exoplanet search.The point of our de-trending or modeling of stellar + s/c variability is to make search more effective, and (later) characterization more accurate.
  • causal pixel modeling, day 2

    13 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    In re-reading yesterday's post, I found it strange to hear myself say that the model was over-fitting stellar variability and then we decided to make the model far more flexible! Today we decided that we don't yet have the technology (well, perhaps not the patience, since we want to detect exoplanets asap) to fully separate stellar variability from spacecraft-induced issues, or at least we would have to do something that pooled much more data to do it—we wouldn't be able to work on one light-curve at a time. So we de-scoped to exoplanet science and decided that we would try to fit out…
  • causal pixel modeling, day 1

    12 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Today Foreman-Mackey and I arrived in Tübingen to work with Schölkopf. On arrival, we got Dun Wang on the phone, because our trip to MPI-IS is designed to make huge progress on Wang's recalibration of the Kepler satellite detector pixels, using the variations that are found in common across stars. The way Schölkopf likes to say it is that we are capitalizing on the causal structure of the problem: If stars (or, really, pixels illuminated by stars) co-vary it must be because of the telescope, since the stars are causally disconnected. The goal of our work on this is to increase the…
  • oscillating stars as clocks

    11 Aug 2014 | 8:59 pm
    On a walk up the mountain to MPIA, Rix and I discussed quantitatively the question of whether stellar oscillations could be used as clocks, to measure kinematics, pulsar timing, stellar companions, and so on. We got results that make me optimistic. I started to write some words about doing this in practice using the Kepler data. It all hinges on the quality factor—the coherence of the oscillation modes—and the signal-to-noise ratio at which they are detected in the full data set.Later in the day, Fadely showed early results from his machine learning applied to SDSS colors (to…
 
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    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • Type Ia supernovae stem from the explosion of white dwarfs coupled with twin stars

    20 Aug 2014 | 2:36 am
    Study discards possibility that type Ia supernovae might stem from explosions of white dwarfs nourished by normal stars. Were these conclusions to become generalized, type Ia supernovae might no longer serve as “standard candles” to measure astronomical distancesType Ia supernovae happen when a white dwarf, the “corpse” of a star similar to the Sun, absorbs material from a twin star until it reaches a critical mass--1.4 times that of the Sun—and explodes. Because of their origin, all these explosions share a very similar luminosity. This uniformity made type Ia supernovae ideal…
  • NASA's RXTE Satellite Decodes the Rhythm of an Unusual Black Hole

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:01 am
    Explore M82 X-1 and learn more about how astronomers used X-ray fluctuations to determine its status as an intermediate-mass black hole. Image Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight CenterAstronomers have uncovered rhythmic pulsations from a rare type of black hole 12 million light-years away by sifting through archival data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite.The signals have helped astronomers identify an unusual midsize black hole called M82 X-1, which is the brightest X-ray source in a galaxy known as Messier 82. Most black holes formed by dying stars are modestly-sized,…
  • Protostars in Orion

    18 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    OMC-2 FIR 4Credit: Herschel image: ESA/Herschel/Ph. André, D. Polychroni, A. Roy, V. Könyves, N. Schneider for the Gould Belt survey Key Programme; inset and layout: ESA/ATG medialab. Results from Herschel may have helped to solve a puzzle surrounding our own Sun's past. By studying very young stars in the Orion Nebula, astronomers have been able to gain an insight into how the Sun may have been behaving in its youth.By using the HIFI spectrometer to detect the far-infrared light at very specific frequencies, the team obtained the chemical fingerprint of a range of atoms and molecules…
  • Galactic soup

    14 Aug 2014 | 8:00 pm
    2MASX J16133219+5103436, SDSS J161330.18+510335 and Zw I 136 Credit:  Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt Hi-res imageThis new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a whole host of colourful and differently shaped galaxies; some bright and nearby, some fuzzy, and some so far from us they appear as small specks in the background sky.The most prominent characters are the two galaxies on the left — 2MASX J16133219+5103436 at the bottom, and its blue-tinted companion SDSS J161330.18+510335 at the top. The latter is slightly closer to us than its…
  • NASA's Chandra Observatory Searches for Trigger of Nearby Supernova

    14 Aug 2014 | 8:39 am
    Chandra data is being used to help determine what caused SN 2014J to explode. Astronomers first spotted SN 2014J in the M82 galaxy on January 21, 2014, making it one of the closest supernovas discovered in decades. SN 2014J is a Type Ia supernova, an important class of objects used to measure the expansion of the Universe. The non-detection of X-rays from Chandra gives information about the environment around the star before SN 2014J exploded. Credit:NASA/CXC/SAO/R.Margutti et al. High Resolution (jpg)    Low Resolution (jpg) Cambridge, MA -New data from NASA's Chandra X-ray…
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    The Urban Astronomer

  • Jupiter & Venus Conjunction – Closest Approach Since 2000

    14 Aug 2014 | 4:08 pm
    After the Moon, the two brightest objects in the night sky are the planets Venus and Jupiter. Venus is a close neighbor and a very reflective planet, dominating morning and evening skies with its brilliant white shimmer against the changing colors of the dawn or dusk sky. Jupiter is the giant planet of the Solar System and despite its distance, is a bold and bright object for us to enjoy, especially in a telescope or binoculars. Venus & Jupiter ConjunctionThese two planets, like all of the objects in the Solar System, gradually change their position with respect to the background stars…
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2014 - what to expect

    10 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    This year’s Perseid Meteor Shower will peak on August 11-12-13 and should offer up a moderately pleasing view of meteors but will be impacted by the nearly Full Moon. Meteors come in all sizes and shapes and during a reliable shower like the Perseids, you can see them all. However, moonlight increases the ambient lighting of the entire night sky and consequently makes the faint meteors all but invisible. The medium-strength meteors and the fireballs will shine through the glare of course, so the Perseids will have a showing, but just not at the rate we often see during a truly dark sky…
  • August 2014 Supermoon

    7 Aug 2014 | 4:22 pm
    Moon at Apogee and PerigeeWe are in the midst of a three-month period of Supermoons, a confluence of orbital nodes that brings us the Full Moon phase at the same time as Perigee, the closest approach of the Moon to the Earth. The next one is on August 10. The difference in the Moon's distance from the Earth from Perigee to Apogee is quite substantial, varying from 222,000 miles out to 253,000 miles, leading to the a 14% difference in the apparent size of the Moon. In addition, the Moon will be at the peak of the ascending node of its orbit, placing it somewhat higher in the sky than is…
  • August Opens With an Evening Show

    31 Jul 2014 | 11:10 pm
    Evening ShowThe waning crescent Moon creates a majestic skyscape to open the month of August, shimmering against the dusk sky with the shiny colors of Spica, Mars and Saturn in the path. Each evening the trio of planets and stars will have the Moon in their midst, and the Moon will slip gradually eastward with each successive night.I enjoy seeing the waxing Moon with its delicate shape and edge-on illumination from the Sun. It's fun to see in a telescope and it always holds the promise of the gentle glow of Earthshine. In the middle of summer, the ecliptic is low on the southern horizon and…
  • Sun and Moon and Ebb Tides

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:06 pm
    A kayaking friend of mine referred me to a question posed by a fellow kayaker regarding tides in and around the Golden Gate: Why are Ebb Tides strongest in SF Bay at night during the summer and during the day in winter? I love this kind of question, where the celestial mechanics of the Solar System impact the daily experiences of hobbyists and average people on Earth. First of all, why are there differences in size of high & low tides throughout the month and year? Each month the highest highs and lowest lows occur when the Moon is Full or New. That’s pretty simple. But…
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    sci.astro

  • HOW EINSTEINIANS KILL AND THEN RESURRECT RELATIVITY

    20 Aug 2014 | 2:17 am
    Shock, horror: http://www.fqxi.org/community/articles/display/148 "Many physicists argue that time is an illusion. Lee Smolin begs to differ. (...) Smolin wishes to hold on to the reality of time. But to do so, he must overcome a major hurdle: General and special relativity seem to imply the oppos
  • Re: EINSTEIN'S RELATIVITY INCOMPATIBLE WITH GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT

    19 Aug 2014 | 11:18 pm
    A desperately lying Einsteinian (who has not yet left the sinking ship): http://briankoberlein.com/2014/08/19/red/ Brian Koberlein: "When we shine the flashlight upward, Newtonian gravity would say that the light is unaffected, since light is massless, but under general relativity light is affecte
  • Re: THE TWIN ABSURDITY IN EINSTEIN'S RELATIVITY

    19 Aug 2014 | 4:08 pm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation_of_moving_particles "According to special relativity, the rate of clock C traveling between two synchronized laboratory clocks A and B is slowed with respect to the laboratory clock rates. This effect is called time dilation." The principle of relativity
  • God likes stars

    19 Aug 2014 | 3:43 pm
    there are stars a lot like a black hole they are the most cold parts of the universe - tidal forces make particles have a big wave length particles almost do not move - it could be true these stars are a super conductor super fluid and Bose Einstein condensate - mass and energy move away a lot like
  • Re: THE WORDS "ONLY APPARENTLY" IN EINSTEIN'S 1905 PAPER

    19 Aug 2014 | 10:14 am
    A century of ferocious brainwashing has converted Einsteinians into Bingos able to believe anything their superiors tell them to believe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gX5ajyPr96M "Bingo the Clowno" So, despite the evidence to the contrary (published in the relativistic literature), Einsteinian
 
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    uk.sci.astronomy

  • Lets meet up in the Awards functions

    5 Aug 2014 | 11:13 pm
    Dear Professional Colleague, Greetings! I am pleased to write to you about "Global Leadership Awards 2014" on 20th December, 2014, at MMA, 411, Samruddhi Commercial Complex, ChincholiBunder Road Ext, Malad (West), Mumbai – 400 064. The awards process allows participants to strengthen their story a
  • Re: Fireball over Somerset

    5 Aug 2014 | 3:39 am
    "Hils" wrote in message news:lr3ulg$eb2$1@speranza.aioe.org... > Seen over North Somerset today at 2203 UTC, SW to NE, duration about 2s, > about a quarter the diameter of the moon, brighter than a full moon. Looks like it may have been an early Perseid. ----- Original Mess
  • Fireball over Somerset

    27 Jul 2014 | 3:32 pm
    Seen over North Somerset today at 2203 UTC, SW to NE, duration about 2s, about a quarter the diameter of the moon, brighter than a full moon.
  • Re: The colorful elements of our moon and otherwise Venus, each have their issues

    19 Jul 2014 | 1:08 pm
    Our moon is on average quite physically dark, but it isn't nearly as monochromatic and inert as our Apollo era discovered of so many areas of nearly off-white terrain with little or nothing of physically dark stuff, much less of any mineral/element colors (not even of any UV secondary/recoil hues) t
  • Re: The colorful elements of our moon and otherwise Venus, each have their issues

    14 Jul 2014 | 8:46 am
    There should be some new amateur color images of our super-moon getting posted and otherwise picked up by the Google image archive.  Don't bother to share any of this with our colorblind NASA, DARPA, ASU and JPL, because any such color enhanced images are supposed to be fakes and otherwise entirely
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    Big Picture Science

  • Moving Right Along

    18 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    You think your life is fast-paced, but have you ever seen a bacterium swim across your countertop? You’d be surprised how fast they can move. Find out why modeling the swirl of hurricanes takes a roomful of mathematicians and supercomputers, and how galaxies can move away from us faster than the speed of light. Also, what happens when we try to stop the dance of atoms, cooling things down to the rock bottom temperature known as absolute zero. And why your watch doesn’t keep the same time when you’re in a jet as when you’re at the airport. It’s all due to the fact that motion is…
  • De-Extinction Show

    11 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE Maybe goodbye isn’t forever. Get ready to mingle with mammoths and gaze upon a ground sloth. Scientists want to give some animals a round-trip ticket back from oblivion. Learn how we might go from scraps of extinct DNA to creating live previously-extinct animals, and the man who claims it’s his mission to repopulate the skies with passenger pigeons. But even if we have the tools to bring vanished animals back, should we? Plus, the extinction of our own species: are we engineering the end of humans via our technology? Guests: Beth Shapiro – Associate professor of ecology and…
  • Eye Spy

    4 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Who’s watching you? Could be anyone, really. Social media sites, webcams, CCTV cameras and smartphones have made keeping tabs on you as easy as tapping “refresh” on a tablet. And who knows what your cell phone records are telling the NSA? Surveillance technology has privacy on the run, as we navigate between big data benefits and Big Brother intrusion. Find out why wearing Google Glass could make everything you see the property of its creator, and which Orwellian technologies are with us today. But just how worried should we be? A cyber security expert weighs in. Also, the benefits of…
  • Replace What Ails You

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Germs can make us sick, but we didn’t know about these puny pathogens prior to the end of the 19th century. Just the suggestion that a tiny bug could spread disease made eyes roll. Then came germ theory, sterilization, and antibiotics. It was a revolution in medicine. Now we’re on the cusp of another one. This time we may cure what ails us by replacing what ails us. Bioengineers use advancements in stem cell therapy to grow red and white cells for human blood. Meanwhile, a breakthrough in 3D printing: scientists print blood vessels and say that human organs may be next. Plus, implanting…
  • A Stellar Job

    21 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    The stars are out tonight. And they do more than just twinkle. These boiling balls of hot plasma can tell us something about other celestial phenomena. They betray the hiding places of black holes, for one. But they can also fool us. Find out why one of the most intriguing discoveries in astrobiology – that of the potentially habitable exoplanet Gliese 581g – may have been just a mirage. Plus, the highest levels of ultraviolet light ever mentioned on Earth’s surface puzzles scientists: is it a fluke of nature, or something manmade? And a physicist suggests that stars could be…
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    StarDate Online

  • Great Red Spot III

    damonddb
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Jupiter’s Great Red Spot appears to be on a diet. It’s slimmed down by thousands of miles, and the loss has accelerated in recent years. Planetary scientists say there’s no way to know what will happen next. Back in the 19th century, the oval-shaped storm was roughly 25,000 miles wide — about three times the diameter of Earth. By the time the Voyager spacecraft flew past Jupiter in the 1970s, the spot had shrunk to twice the diameter of Earth. And this year, Hubble Space Telescope measured its length at not much more than one Earth diameter. The Great Red Spot is flanked by strong jet…
  • Great Red Spot II

    damonddb
    18 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Jupiter’s Great Red Spot may have been around for centuries. Yet during that long span it’s been anything but steady. It wiggles back and forth, it changes size, and it even changes color. In fact, just why the Great Red Spot is red is still a puzzler. The spot is a giant storm. At its peak it was wide enough to swallow three Earths, although it’s been shrinking for decades; more about that tomorrow. Its cloudtops tower several miles above the surrounding layers of clouds in Jupiter’s thick atmosphere. Winds are strongest near its edge, where they race along at hundreds of miles per…
  • Long-Lasting Storm

    damonddb
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Jupiter's giant "eye," the Great Red Spot, stares outward from the planet in this 1979 image from the Voyager 1 spacecraft. The spot is the largest storm in the solar system, and may have been swirling since the 1600s or earlier. In recent decades, however, it has been shrinking; today, it's only about half as wide as in this image. Planetary scientists aren't sure whether the Great Red Spot will rebound or dissipate. [NASA/JPL/Björn Jónsson (IAAA)] Text ©2014 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate…
  • Great Red Spot

    damonddb
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Astronomers have been looking at Jupiter through their telescopes for more than four centuries. And for a good bit of that time, they’ve seen Jupiter staring right back. The giant planet’s most prominent feature is a gigantic storm system that looks like a bloodshot eye — the Great Red Spot. It’s the biggest storm in the solar system — wider than Earth. It’s also the longest-lasting storm — although just how long it’s been around isn’t certain. Robert Hooke reported seeing a large, oval-shaped feature on Jupiter in 1664 — exactly 350 years ago. Its size and location match…
  • More Venus and Jupiter

    damonddb
    16 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The two brightest objects in the night sky other than the Moon will stand side by side at dawn tomorrow like a pair of headlights. They’re quite low in the eastern sky, though, so you need a clear horizon to see them. Venus is the brighter of the two. It’s on the far side of the Sun, and is preparing to pass behind the Sun this fall. So right now, most of the hemisphere that faces our way is awash in sunlight. Seen through a telescope, the planet looks like an almost-full Moon. Unlike the Moon, though, Venus isn’t brightest when it’s full because that’s when it’s farthest from…
 
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    A Pacific View

  • Hurricane Iselle's aftermath

    12 Aug 2014 | 12:38 am
    Hawaii, especially the district of Puna on the Big Island, rarely makes the news, even on the local TV stations in the State. It's a neglected district with many quite poor people living here. Some areas are very beautiful and have many vacation rentals for visitors, some are ravaged by lava flows, but overall it is a large area (roughly the size of Oahu) with thousands of relatively poor families.Hurricane Iselle devastated much of the district last Thursday night. Thousands of people are without power or running water, some are still trapped on their streets by downed trees. Houses have…
  • Well, it's in the public domain now - UKIRT's future

    24 Apr 2014 | 2:05 am
    Latest news can be seen here -SFGate news about UKIRT. I'm sure other media sources will pick things up over the next day or so. Local rags picked it up quickly but aren't the places I want to direct people to. Don't know anything about SFGate, but haven't hit a paywall there yet.
  • The Long Goodbye

    15 Mar 2014 | 1:23 am
    Eddie, the cat on the right, has been with me almost since the day I arrived in Hawaii. She's approaching 18 years old now and as a kitten wasn't expected to survive her first year. She was 10-weeks old and just skin and bones and clearly the runt of the litter when I adopted her. The person at the Humane Society told me she needed a lot of love and care to survive, and when her adopted sister, Patsy, died just a few weeks later from FIP, the vet said it was likely she had contracted the disease as well and would die young.Well, over 17 years later she is still with me, nearly as energetic as…
  • A room with a view

    18 Dec 2013 | 9:33 pm
    Well, Pam opened her Christmas present early, so I can post it here now as well! This was the view from our hotel room in Astoria, Oregon, of the Columbia River and the Astoria-Megler Bridge (you can click on the picture for a much larger version). I can't say enough good things about the Cannery Pier Hotel, it's one of the best places we have ever stayed at, I highly recommend a visit if you ever get the chance. I now have only a short trip in the future to achieve and complete a small ambition of mine, which is to have driven the entire coast of California and Oregon: Los Angeles to San…
  • California sunset

    15 Dec 2013 | 1:30 am
     It's been almost a year since I last posted anything here. Sorry about that. The reasons are both personal and professional and I'm not up to updating anyone on either of those right now. But I did want to share an amazing sunset both Pam and I saw a week or so before Thanksgiving.This was a sunset seen from Carpinteria Beach. Apparently it's the safest beach in America, or something like along those lines.I felt very safe, especially as I wasn't in the water and I didn't see any muggers or assassins near me. Lots of people were there that evening because the sunset the previous evening…
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    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • Rosetta has arrived at comet 67P!

    Team
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:26 am
    After an epic 10-year journey, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived today August 06, 2014 at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko becoming the first spacecraft to rendezvous with a comet.  Launched in March 2004, Rosetta had to make three gravity-assist flybys of Earth and one of Mars to help it on course to its rendezvous with the comet. This complex course also allowed Rosetta to pass by asteroids Šteins and Lutetia, obtaining unprecedented views and scientific data on these two objects. Rosetta woke up from deep space hibernation on 20 January 2014, nine million…
  • New Comet: C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE)

    Team
    13 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Cbet nr. 3921, issued on 2014, July 13, announces the discovery of a comet (~ magnitude 17) by the  Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (or NEOWISE; formerly the WISE satellite) team on images taken with the NEOWISE satellite on 2014, July 04.5. The new comet has been designated C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, July 09.6 from Q62 (iTelescope network - Siding Spring) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + focal reducer,…
  • Close Approach of PHA Asteroid 2014 MF6

    Team
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:27 am
    The asteroid 2014 MF6 was discovered (at magnitude ~17.0) on 2014, June 23.3 by Catalina Sky Survey (MPC code 703) with a 0.68-m Schmidt + CCD. According to the preliminay orbit, 2014 MF6 is an Apollo type asteroid. This class of asteroids are defined by having semi-major axes greater than that of the Earth (> 1 AU) but perihelion distances less than the Earth's aphelion distance (q < 1.017 AU). It is also flagged as a "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid". PHA are asteroids larger than approximately 100m that might have threatening close approaches to the Earth (they can come closer to…
  • New Comet: P/2014 L2 (NEOWISE)

    Team
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    Cbet nr. 3901, issued on 2014, June 15, announces the discovery of a comet (~ magnitude 16.5) by the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) team on images taken with the NEOWISE satellite on 2014, June 07.4. The new comet has been designated P/2014 L2 (NEOWISE).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 12 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, June 15.4 from H06 (iTelescope network, New Mexico) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, shows that this object is a comet…
  • Update on comet C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS)

    Team
    9 Jun 2014 | 6:42 am
    C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS) is a comet discovered on 17 May 2012 (see CBET circular 3112 & MPEC 2012-K36) in two r-band 40-s exposures taken with the 1.8-m Pan-STARRS 1 telescope at Haleakala (MPC code F51). The comet is currently at visual magnitude ~ 8.5 and it will reach the perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on 27 August 2014 at a distance of 1.05 AU (1 AU = ~150 million kilometers) from the Sun. Comet C/2012 K1 is expected to brighten up to mag ~6-7 in mid-October 2014 (with an elongation of about 75-80 degree from the Sun). Below you can see the light curve (click on it for a…
 
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    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • New Star Catalog Reveals Unexpected 'Solar Salad'

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:26 pm
    An Arizona State University alumnus has devised the largest catalog ever produced for stellar compositions. Called the Hypatia Catalog, after one of the first female astronomers who lived in approximately 350 AD in Alexandria, the work is critical to understanding the properties of stars, how they form and possible connections with orbiting planets. And what she found from her work is that the compositions of nearby stars aren’t as uniform as once thought. Since it is not possible to physically sample a star to determine its composition, astronomers study the light from the object. This is…
  • Scientists Find Traces of Sea Plankton on ISS Surface

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:06 pm
    An experiment of taking samples from illuminators and the ISS surface has brought unique results, as scientists had found traces of sea plankton there, the chief of an orbital mission on Russia’s ISS segment told reporters. Results of the scope of scientific experiments which had been conducted for a quite long time were summed up in the previous year, confirming that some organisms can live on the surface of the International Space Station (ISS) for years amid factors of a space flight, such as zero gravity, temperature conditions and hard cosmic radiation. Several surveys proved that…
  • Polish and Chinese Satellites Successfully Launched into Space

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Aug 2014 | 12:57 pm
    China on Tuesday successfully launched its most advanced earth observation satellite, the Gaofen-2, and the Polish satellite BRITE-PL-2, also known as “Heweliusz”. The launch took place at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in north China's Shanxi Province at 11:15 a.m. Beijing Time. Gaofen-2 is the country's second high-definition satellite in orbit. The "Heweliusz" satellite, which is designed to observe the brightest stars in our Galaxy, is the Polish contribution to the BRITE mission, developed by a consortium of Canadian, Austrian and Polish institutes. The satellites were boosted…
  • Galileo Satellites Encapsulated, Soyuz in the Launch Zone

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:57 am
    Arianespace’s medium-lift workhorse is “standing tall” in French Guiana – and ready for its Galileo payload – following Soyuz’ transfer at the vehicle’s dedicated Spaceport launch complex. Europe’s latest Galileo satellites have been sealed within their launch fairing, atop the Fregat upper stage that will carry them into their final orbit. The two Galileo satellites had been attached together on the dispenser that secures them during flight then delivers them into their final orbit on 21 August. At three hours, 47 minutes and 57 seconds after liftoff, the satellites will then…
  • Curiosity Removes Dust at 'Bonanza King'

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:34 am
    NASA's Curiosity Mars rover used the Dust Removal Tool on its robotic arm to brush aside reddish, more-oxidized dust, revealing a gray patch of less-oxidized rock material at a target called "Bonanza King," visible in this image from the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam). The Mastcam's right-eye camera, which has a telephoto lens, took this image on Aug. 17, 2014, during the 722nd Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars. The brushing activity occurred earlier the same sol. The rover team is evaluating Bonanza King as a possible drilling target. The mission has previously drilled into…
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    Controversy Solved

  • The Chronicles of NASA: The Man,the Moon & the Myth

    Word Smith
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:52 am
    It’s that merry time that comes once every year.The Celebration of our first trek off of this earthly sphere. It fills most Americans with patriotic cheer, as their rivals the Russians,boo and jeer. And in the middle of all this, what do I see? An age old controversy and so I shall end this rhyme, so weird and queerI now regret starting it, Oh dear, Oh dear Diminished hopes of being his peerI’m afraid this can’t compare to a sonnet of Shakespeare Thus concludes my short lived poet’s careerBut Wait! Oh Dear readers, the point is missed I fear!I have gone off on a tangent it would…
  • Transformers:The Rise of the Writer Robots

    Word Smith
    12 Jul 2014 | 4:23 am
    Dear Readers I bring to you this alarming bulletin immediately after stumbling upon the disturbing news that I am actually, a computer program. Hold on! Wait! Wait just a second…I’m getting a new update…After further experimentation, which involved slapping myself in the face (which hurt) and a swift sharp kick in the crotch (delivered by my girl friend ,which hurt even more; not because of her betrayal but more by the action itself) it is safe to conclude that, I, am real. Not so fast Geppetto, whether I’m a real boy or a girl shall be determined after doctors examine my…
  • Minecraft: Asteroid edition

    Word Smith
    27 Jun 2014 | 5:34 am
    Dear readers If you think this to be a misleading ploy, utilizing a famous franchise/brand; to attract views then you would be nothing short of utterly correct. It was cleverly devised by a devious friend of mine. Ok, ok you caught me; I have no friends hahaha. This is the kind of self effacing humor which can be expected from this blog.What you can also expect is Controversy. To find it we once again look to the celestial heavens, more specifically to the rocky masses rolling through space AKA Asteroids.  In case the title didn’t already give it away (In which case you probably…
  • Just Dusting The Big Bang Theory

    Word Smith
    19 Jun 2014 | 8:51 am
    Dear Readers I apologize for being off the interweb for some time. Contrary to popular belief I do have a life, but that is a controversy for another time. On this auspicious day I have decided to tackle the fascinating, the intriguing and extremely controversial topic regarding the recent detection of gravitational waves, and as I do so I am completely aware that I am miles behind the whole band wagon. FYI, I was waiting for some time to ensure its validity. But first, lemme t.......ell you that I do not under any circumstance employ or even think to paraphrase cheesy "trending"…
  • Valentines Day. If I Do Quote So Myself.

    Word Smith
    16 Feb 2014 | 10:53 pm
    Dear Astute Readers This is just a quote I came up with ,albeit late,for Valentines.Be it single or plural I hope you had a brilliant day. Photo credit: http://stazzix.deviantart.com/
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