Astronomy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Losing the Comet but Winning the Ring

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    16 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    The Ring Nebula, M57 in Lyra, by John Chumack When the clouds finally cleared from overhead, they were replaced by clouds upon the ground. I stood in my driveway looking up at the stars arrayed above while fog swirled around my feet. These are not ideal conditions for observing, but at least the stars can be seen, whereas the clouds had been blocking all manner of wonders, including the recent aurora, for nights on end. My goal has been to find Comet Jacques and – spoiler alert – I still have not accomplished it. Even though I’ve used the finder maps and zeroed in on exactly where it…
  • Holiday Lights So Bright You Can See ‘em from Space

    Universe Today
    Bob King
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:32 am
    Christmas lighting displays like this one near Duluth, Minn. U.S. contribute to increased brightness around cities that can be seen from outer space. Credit: Bob King Call it holiday light creep. A NASA satellite has been tracking the spread of Christmas lighting from 512 miles up for the past three years and according to the data, nighttime lights around many major U.S. cities shine 20 to 50 percent brighter during Christmas and New Year’s when compared to light output during the rest of the year. Not surprisingly, most it comes from suburban areas. (...)Read the rest of Holiday Lights…
  • Closest Stars to the Sun

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    29 Nov 2014 | 8:33 am
    The Sun, our nearest star, by John Chumack When snow covers the ground and we shiver from scant Sun rays and long nights, it’s not hard for our thoughts to turn to our nearest star. One cure for wintertime blues is to travel south to a place where the Sun shines a bit longer and warmth still bakes the Earth. But for the astronomically minded, sometimes we think about getting closer to the Sun in other ways. The Sun is the closest star to Earth, even though sometimes it feels completely absent. But what are the other stars close to Earth and why can’t they help keep our toes from freezing?
  • My Observing Wish List

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:48 am
    Aurora Photo by John Chumack All amateur astronomers have a wish list of objects they would like to observe. When they first start observing, the list is modest, with objects such as the moons of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, craters on the Moon, the Andromeda Galaxy, the Orion Nebula, and so forth. By this point in my life, I have seen these objects multiple times. They are beautiful and always worth a look, but they certainly wouldn’t be something to put on my wish list anymore. My current wish list is a bit more exotic. Some of the items I have seen but want to see again, while others I…
  • Jupiter From Below

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    A Cassini view of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Instead of Saturn, this Cassini image shows us Jupiter from a completely different perspective.  Yes there is a view from the north too it’s linked below. No polar vortex is evident from this image. From ESA’s Space in Images: This Cassini image shows Jupiter from an unusual perspective. If you were to float just beneath the giant planet and look directly up, you would be greeted with this striking sight: red, bronze and white bands encircling a hazy south pole. The multicoloured…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy Today

  • Closest Stars to the Sun

    Kelly
    29 Nov 2014 | 8:33 am
    The Sun, our nearest star, by John Chumack When snow covers the ground and we shiver from scant Sun rays and long nights, it’s not hard for our thoughts to turn to our nearest star. One cure for wintertime blues is to travel south to a place where the Sun shines a bit longer and warmth still bakes the Earth. But for the astronomically minded, sometimes we think about getting closer to the Sun in other ways. The Sun is the closest star to Earth, even though sometimes it feels completely absent. But what are the other stars close to Earth and why can’t they help keep our toes from freezing?
  • My Observing Wish List

    Kelly
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:48 am
    Aurora Photo by John Chumack All amateur astronomers have a wish list of objects they would like to observe. When they first start observing, the list is modest, with objects such as the moons of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, craters on the Moon, the Andromeda Galaxy, the Orion Nebula, and so forth. By this point in my life, I have seen these objects multiple times. They are beautiful and always worth a look, but they certainly wouldn’t be something to put on my wish list anymore. My current wish list is a bit more exotic. Some of the items I have seen but want to see again, while others I…
  • An Early Morning Eclipse

    Kelly
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:41 am
    A Partial Lunar Eclipse during Moonset The total lunar eclipse was going to occur from about 5:30 to 6:30 on Wednesday morning. My alarm was set for 6:00, like usual, and the forecast was for perfectly clear skies. I was awake fifteen minutes before my alarm but patiently waited until six o’clock, because the only upstairs windows that face west where the eclipsed Moon was setting are in my children’s bedrooms. I was not awake enough to go downstairs nor mean enough to wake them unnecessarily early. At 6:00 I walked into my son’s bedroom and raised his blinds, like I do every morning to…
  • Losing the Comet but Winning the Ring

    Kelly
    16 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    The Ring Nebula, M57 in Lyra, by John Chumack When the clouds finally cleared from overhead, they were replaced by clouds upon the ground. I stood in my driveway looking up at the stars arrayed above while fog swirled around my feet. These are not ideal conditions for observing, but at least the stars can be seen, whereas the clouds had been blocking all manner of wonders, including the recent aurora, for nights on end. My goal has been to find Comet Jacques and – spoiler alert – I still have not accomplished it. Even though I’ve used the finder maps and zeroed in on exactly where it…
  • Targeting Sagittarius

    Kelly
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:55 am
    M8, The Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius, by John Chumack Sagittarius is an incredibly rich area for stargazing, but it’s only easily viewable for a short time. Summer is the best season for observing, but even then it stays low on the southern horizon. Sagittarius is an easy constellation even for children to spot because it has a grouping of stars that looks almost exactly like a teapot. Get out a pair of binoculars or use the finderscope on your telescope and scan the area until you find a fuzzy patch in the sky. Then look through the eyepiece of the telescope to see if you’ve captured a…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy News

  • Jupiter From Below

    Tom
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    A Cassini view of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Instead of Saturn, this Cassini image shows us Jupiter from a completely different perspective.  Yes there is a view from the north too it’s linked below. No polar vortex is evident from this image. From ESA’s Space in Images: This Cassini image shows Jupiter from an unusual perspective. If you were to float just beneath the giant planet and look directly up, you would be greeted with this striking sight: red, bronze and white bands encircling a hazy south pole. The multicoloured…
  • Philae at Perihelion Cliff

    Tom
    17 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Philae’s look at its landing area. Image Credit: Copyright: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA It be could be the location of ESA’s Philae lander on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has been narrowed down. The image above is from that location and we are looking at what has been named “Perihelion Cliff.” The image was taken with the CIVA camera (Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser) on Philae. To see a graphic showing the position of the Philae in the context of topographic modeling click here. (image credit as above via JPL) Some of the first of the Rosetta results are being…
  • Goodbye Venus Express

    Tom
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Artists concept of Venus Express aerobraking. Credit: ESA Word comes from ESA the Venus Express mission has come to an end: ESA’s Venus Express has ended its eight-year mission after far exceeding its planned life. The spacecraft exhausted its propellant during a series of thruster burns to raise its orbit following the low-altitude aerobraking earlier this year. Since its arrival at Venus in 2006, Venus Express had been on an elliptical 24‑hour orbit, traveling 66 000 km above the south pole at its furthest point and to within 200 km over the north pole on its closest approach,…
  • Moon Pairing

    Tom
    15 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Cassini spies a pair of Saturn moons. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute A very nice Cassini image of the Saturn moons Rhea and Tethys. The orientation of the pair is such that we can see what looks like large matching craters on each moon.  I believe the crater on Rhea (the moon in front) is Tirawa.  The crater is 360 km / 220 mile wide and makes up the Tirawa impact basin. The crater on Tethys is even larger, a true giant considering it is has a diameter 400 km / 249 miles or about 40 percent of the moons diameter. From the Cassini site: Tethys appears to be…
  • JUICE Gets Approval

    Tom
    14 Dec 2014 | 9:05 pm
    Artist’s impression of the JUICE mission. Credit: ESA/AOES ESA has given the JUICE mission the go ahead to move to the next stage of implementation. JUICE is the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer and will (hopefully) launch in 2022. The spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in 2030 to study the giant planet’s atmosphere and magnetosphere, the rings, and the larger moons. The moons to be studied are likely: Ganymede, Callisto, Europa, and Io. Io is a volcanic wonder and the other three might have internal liquid oceans and therefore could contain habitat for life. From the ESA press release:…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Universe Today

  • Weekly Space Hangout – Dec. 19, 2014: Methane on Mars!

    Fraser Cain
    19 Dec 2014 | 11:54 am
    Host: Fraser Cain (@fcain) Guests: Morgan Rehnberg (cosmicchatter.org / @cosmic_chatter) Ramin Skibba (@raminskibba) Alessondra Springmann (@sondy) (...)Read the rest of Weekly Space Hangout – Dec. 19, 2014: Methane on Mars! (296 words) © Fraser for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: black hole, cats, cluster, Curiosity, Dark Matter, galaxy, India, JAXA, Mars, MAVEN, MESSENGER, Morpheus, NASA, NSF, SOFIA, Soyuz Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • Rocket Issues force SpaceX and NASA to Postpone Falcon 9 Rocket Launch to January 2015

    Ken Kremer
    18 Dec 2014 | 8:28 pm
    A SpaceX Falcon 9 erect at Cape Canaveral launch pad 40 awaiting launch on Sept 20, 2014, on the CRS-4 mission in this file photo. The next Falcon 9 launch has been postponed to Jan. 6, 2015 to ensure the rocket is ready. Credit: Ken Kremer – kenkremer.com KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL – Due to technical problems encountered during a hot fire test of the first stage engines this week with the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, the planned Dec. 19 launch of the commercial rocket and NASA contracted Dragon cargo freighter to the International Space Station (ISS) on a critical resupply mission has…
  • Compromises Lead to Climate Change Deal

    Matt Williams
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:05 pm
    Secretary-General Addresses Lima Climate Action High-level Meeting.Credit: UN Photo/Mark Garten Earlier this month, delegates from the various states that make up the UN met in Lima, Peru, to agree on a framework for the Climate Change Conference that is scheduled to take place in Paris next year. For over two weeks, representatives debated and discussed the issue, which at times became hotly contested and divisive. In the end, a compromise was reached between rich and developing nations, which found themselves on opposite sides for much of the proceedings. And while few member states walked…
  • Holiday Lights So Bright You Can See ‘em from Space

    Bob King
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:32 am
    Christmas lighting displays like this one near Duluth, Minn. U.S. contribute to increased brightness around cities that can be seen from outer space. Credit: Bob King Call it holiday light creep. A NASA satellite has been tracking the spread of Christmas lighting from 512 miles up for the past three years and according to the data, nighttime lights around many major U.S. cities shine 20 to 50 percent brighter during Christmas and New Year’s when compared to light output during the rest of the year. Not surprisingly, most it comes from suburban areas. (...)Read the rest of Holiday Lights…
  • Kepler ‘K2′ Finds First Exoplanet, A ‘Super-Earth’, While Surfing Sun’s Pressure Wave For Control

    Elizabeth Howell
    18 Dec 2014 | 8:14 am
    Artist’s conception of the Kepler Space Telescope. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech It’s alive! NASA’s Kepler space telescope had to stop planet-hunting during Earth’s northern-hemisphere summer 2013 when a second of its four pointing devices (reaction wheels) failed. But using a new technique that takes advantage of the solar wind, Kepler has found its first exoplanet since the K2 mission was publicly proposed in November 2013. And despite a loss of pointing precision, Kepler’s find was a smaller planet — a super-Earth! It’s likely a water world or a rocky…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astroblog

  • Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy, 19 December 2014

    19 Dec 2014 | 6:21 am
    Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy taken on 19-12-14 with my Canon IXUS point and shoot. 10x 15 second exposures ISO 400 stacked with deep sky stacker. and cropped to the region of interest, showing Pi (bottom) and Nu (top) Pupis and the comet (Click to embiggen)Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy taken on 14-12-14 with my Canon IXUS point and shoot. 10x 15 second exposures ISO 400 stacked with deep sky stacker. and cropped to the region of interest, showing Nu (top right) Pupis and the comet (Click to embiggen)Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy continues to delight. I missed it for a few day due to Nerd Night and clouds, but…
  • Venus Returns!

    19 Dec 2014 | 5:12 am
    Driving back from Nerd Night I thought I caught a glimpse of the bright planet on Wednesday, but it was too cloudy until tonight to confirm.Venus is back! This picture was taken around 9:15 pm ACDST (clcik to embiggen), when Venus was just two finger-widths above the horizon, but it was easy to see from 8:55 pm on. Looks like the Moon-Venus encounter on the 23rd should be nice for everyone with a flat western horizon.
  • Aurora Alert 19-20 December

    18 Dec 2014 | 12:34 pm
    A geomagnetic alert and aurora watch has been issued by the Australian IPS, the activity is due to a glancing blow from a coronal mass ejection. The activity is likley to peak late in the evening of the 19th to the early morning of the 20th, possibly lasting to the night of the 20th.If aurora occur, this may be visible in Tasmania, New Zealand, and possibly Southern Vic, WA and Southern South Australia. However, geomagnetic storms are fickle, and the storm may arrive in daylight or may fizzle out entirely .. or might just be spectacular. As always look to the south for shifting red/green…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday December 18 to Thursday December 25

    16 Dec 2014 | 4:02 am
    The New Moon is Monday December 22. Earth is at solstice at this time. Venus is low in the evening sky and is visited by the Moon on the 23rd. Mars is easily visible in the early evening. Jupiter is prominent in the morning sky. Saturn returns to the morning sky, the Moon is close to Saturn on the 20th. Comet C/2102 Q2 Lovejoy is easily visible in binoculars in the early evening and may become visible to the unaided eye.The New Moon is Monday December 22. Earth is at solstice, when the days are longest, at this time.Evening sky on Tuesday December 23 looking west as seen from Adelaide at…
  • Images of Comet Lovejoy, 2014's Christmas Comet

    15 Dec 2014 | 4:29 am
    Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy taken on 29 November 2014. iTelescope T12, 5x3minute exposures Bin 2, stacked in ImageJ and Median image extracted. Click to embiggen to see the faint tail.  Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy taken on 14 December 2014. iTelescope T12, 5x3minute exposures Bin 2, stacked in ImageJ and Median image extracted. Click to embiggen to see the tail and the galaxy.  I think the two images above give a good idea of how rapidly comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy has brightened. Taken just two weeks apart (okay 15 days) under the same exposure conditions the comet and its tail has brightened…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Hogg's Research

  • calibration and search in Kepler; replacing humans

    17 Dec 2014 | 8:59 pm
    In group meeting we went through the figures for Dun Wang's paper on pixel-level self-calibration of Kepler, figure by figure. We gave him lots of to-do items to tweak the figures. This is all in preparation not just for his paper but also for AAS 225, which is in early January. At the end we asked "Does this set of figures tell the whole story?" and Fadely said "no, they don't show general improvement across a wide range of stars". So we set Wang on finding a set of stars to serve as a statistical "testbed" for the method.Also in group meeting, Foreman-Mackey showed some of the systems…
  • job season

    16 Dec 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Research ground to a halt today in the face of job applications. There's always tomorrow.
  • improving photometry hierarchically

    15 Dec 2014 | 6:48 pm
    Fadely handed me a draft manuscript which I expected to be about star–galaxy classification but ended up being about all the photometric measurements ever! He proposes that we can improve the photometry of an individual object in some band using all the observations we have about all other objects (and the object itself but in different bands). This would all be very model-dependent, but he proposes that we build a flexible model of the underlying distribution with hierarchical Bayes. We spent time today discussing what the underlying assumptions of such a project would be. He already…
  • git trouble

    14 Dec 2014 | 8:59 pm
    I spent a bit of Sunday working on paper one from The Cannon. Unfortunately, most of my time was spent resolving (and getting mad about) git fails, where my co-authors (who shall remain nameless) were editing wrong versions and then patching them in. Argh.
  • redshift probability, lensed supernova, interstellar metallicity

    12 Dec 2014 | 7:24 pm
    At group meeting, Alex Malz showed some first results on using redshift probability distributions in a (say) luminosity function analysis. He showed that he gets different results if he takes the mean of the redshift pdf or the mode or does something better than either of those. I asked him to write that up so we can see if we all agree what "better" is. Fadely handed me a draft of his work to date on the star–galaxy separation stuff he has been working on.After group meeting, at journal club, Or Graur (NYU) showed work he has been doing on a multiply imaged supernova. It looks very…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • A messy star factory

    18 Dec 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Mrk 209 - UGCA 281 Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Nick RoseThis sprinkle of cosmic glitter is a blue compact dwarf galaxy known as Markarian 209. Galaxies of this type are blue-hued, compact in size, gas-rich, and low in heavy elements. They are often used by astronomers to study star formation, as their conditions are similar to those thought to exist in the early Universe.Markarian 209 in particular has been studied extensively. It is filled with diffuse gas and peppered with star-forming regions towards its core. This image captures it undergoing a particularly dramatic…
  • Kepler Proves It Can Still Find Planets

    18 Dec 2014 | 10:18 am
    This artist's conception portrays the first planet discovered by the Kepler spacecraft during its K2 mission. A transit of the planet was teased out of K2's noisier data using ingenious computer algorithms developed by a CfA researcher. The newfound planet, HIP 116454b, has a diameter of 20,000 miles (two and a half times the size of Earth) and weighs 12 times as much. It orbits its star once every 9.1 days. Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA). High Resolution (jpg) Low Resolution (jpg) Cambridge, MA -To paraphrase Mark Twain, the report of the Kepler spacecraft's death was greatly…
  • Life on an aquaplanet

    17 Dec 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Illustration: Christine Daniloff/MITMIT study finds an exoplanet, tilted on its side, could still be habitable if covered in ocean.Nearly 2,000 planets beyond our solar system have been identified to date. Whether any of these exoplanets are hospitable to life depends on a number of criteria. Among these, scientists have thought, is a planet’s obliquity — the angle of its axis relative to its orbit around a star.Earth, for instance, has a relatively low obliquity, rotating around an axis that is nearly perpendicular to the plane of its orbit around the sun. Scientists suspect, however,…
  • NASA's Sun Watching Observatory Sees Mid-level Solar Flare on Dec. 16, 2014

    17 Dec 2014 | 10:04 am
    NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a mid-level solar flare – as seen in the bright flash in the middle –on Dec. 16, 2014 shortly before midnight EST. Image Credit:  NASA/SDO. › View full disk imageThe sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 11:50 p.m. EST on Dec. 16, 2014. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when…
  • The Hot Blue Stars of Messier 47

    17 Dec 2014 | 4:21 am
    PR Image eso1441aThe star cluster Messier 47 PR Image eso1441bThe bright star clusters Messier 47 and Messier 46 in the constellation of Puppis PR Image eso1441cWide-field view of the bright star clusters Messier 47 and Messier 46 Videos PR Video eso1441aZooming in on the star cluster Messier 47 PR Video eso1441bClose up view of the bright star cluster Messier 47 This spectacular image of the star cluster Messier 47 was taken using the Wide Field Imager camera, installed on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile. This young open cluster is dominated by a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Urban Astronomer

  • Lunar Month Begins

    26 Nov 2014 | 7:46 am
    Lunar Month BeginsThanksgiving in the USA is accompanied by a young Moon,  a few days into the lunar cycle and the new lunar month. I enjoy the changing face of our nearest neighbor in the Solar System, a lovely sight early in its cycle. This week we'll see the Moon pass near Mars and then wander through the faint constellation Capricorn, en route to encounters with Neptune and Uranus. The San Francisco Bay Area is being graced with clear, crisp November nights so when the Sun sets after your Thanksgiving dinner, step outside and enjoy the view to the west, and a few hours later you'll…
  • Leonid Meteor Shower 2014

    15 Nov 2014 | 11:30 pm
    I enjoy the annual Leonids meteor shower for many reasons, not the least of which is that it is my birthday meteor shower, peaking on my birthday each year. The peak of the Leonids comes on the evening of November 17 into the early morning hours of November 18, and this year the Moon is a thin waning crescent in the early morning and won't disrupt the viewing of meteors. So, get a warm blanket and a clear view of the sky and enjoy this annual shower that promisesLeonid 'Radiant'Like all meteor showers, they are caused by a remnant of a celestial object, most often a comet or asteroid that…
  • Shiny Pre-Dawn Sky

    8 Nov 2014 | 8:05 pm
    The Moon and JupiterMornings are splendid this time of year, with plenty of darkness to make it easy to see the sky when you first get up, and so much to look at right now. Jupiter shines brightly high in the eastern and southern sky before sunrise, and all of the magnificent winter constellations dominate the sky to the south and above, glimmering in the quiet of the early morning. I savor the moments when I am up early and have a few minutes to take in the spectacle, starting my day on a good note.Over the coming week, the waning Moon graces the southern and eastern skies and passes near…
  • Amazing Sunset and Sunrise Colors

    31 Oct 2014 | 6:36 pm
    Every sunrise and sunset provides a wide range of visual effects, ranging from the elongation of the disk of the Sun as it hugs the horizon, to the amazing range of colors you see in the minutes before and after the Sun’s passage through the horizon. One of my favorite effects is the curious coloration of the opposite horizon from the sunrise or sunset where one sees a colorful and rapidly changing band of sky called the Belt of Venus. Belt of Venus at 35,000 FeetDespite the name, the effect does not have anything to do with Venus the planet. Rather, the effect is due entirely to the shadow…
  • What's Up in Astronomy and Space Exploration

    14 Oct 2014 | 4:47 pm
    Last night a friend asked me "what's up in space exploration and astronomy in the coming weeks?" and I wrote down this list. Enjoy!October 19 - Watching a comet from Mars with NASAOctober 23 - Partial Eclipse of the SunOctober 25 - Bay Area Science Festival astronomy nightNovember 12 - Rosetta probe to land on a cometNovember 17 - A meteor shower: the Leonids
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy with Inc

  • Gravity - Beautiful Visual Explanation

    14 Dec 2014 | 12:02 am
    I found this video online that visually explains gravity. There are several such videos which explains why two objects with mass has gravity between them. What's fascinating in this video is that it not only explains the gravitational pull, but also the orbit of smaller objects around the larger objects, the elliptical orbit that planets take, the anti-clock-wise revolution of all planets around the sun (except of course Venus), and many more. The best part of this video is that it is not explained in computer graphics but explained practically. Watch and enjoy.
  • The Lord of the Rings

    11 May 2014 | 8:21 am
    Hi all. It's been a while since I updated this blog. So here it is. Some of the pics of Saturn I took over a year ago. Used a 6-inch Newtonian Reflector Telescope and Nikon D5100. Took these pics in a-focal method. Removed the camera lens and placed it facing the telescope eye-piece so that the telescope would act as a camera lens. These are unadulterated pics taken at 20 sec exposure and I don't actually remember the ISO settings. These pics were taken from my terrace (in the middle of the city) so you would find some light pollution in them. I was unable to stack these images and so I ended…
  • Silver Rock Photoshoot

    6 Jun 2013 | 7:13 pm
    Below are few of my first snaps of the Moon taken on April 3rd, 2013, using Nikon D5100 along with my M42 (Orion StarSeeker 130 Telescope). Also used a Moon Filter. These photos were taken using afocal method and so the images are not properly focused.
  • Spotting the ISS

    12 May 2013 | 8:42 am
    It was on the evening of 2nd of May, I was riding on my way to work. Just as I was climbing Kattipara Jn, I saw a bright red object in the sky, quite close to Jupiter. I was quite surprised as there couldn't be any object so close to the Jupiter. I looked up again and realized it was moving slowing past the giant planet. I knew it had to be a satellite. After a week, I was checking the Stellarium to find out what that satellite was and I was surprised to know it was none other than ISS (International Space Station). Below is a screen shot from Stellarium.
  • Milky Way - A Magic Beyond Imagination

    17 Mar 2013 | 7:21 pm
    Living in the heart of the city, it is impossible for us to see the beauty of the Milky Way. But we can see this natural beauty with the help of a digital camera. Last month, I went to the Marina Beach as early as 4:00 in the morning with my friend's DSLR (Nikon D5100). Using the Sky Map Android App, I identified the spot where the Milky Way would be at its brightest and took a few snaps of the night sky. And below is the result I got.The above picture was an epic failure. At first I tried to take the photos with different settings of ISO, aperture and shutter speed. After taking about 8…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    sci.astro

  • Christmas Day Noon follows Jupiter in Opposition. 14 BC (-13)

    19 Dec 2014 | 9:10 am
    Christmas Day Noon follows Jupiter in Opposition. 14 BC (-13) Noontime on day is 9:54:31 STD. Midnight preceding this is 21:54:31 STD. Jupiter is above Bethlehem at 21:53:44 STD. Jupter in Opposition midnight is 18:31:12 STD. Banda Aceh Midnight is 17:54:03 STD. There is no 12 hours pointing to Beth
  • 4479 Solutions for Mechanics, Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering Books

    19 Dec 2014 | 6:52 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA, N
  • 4479 Solutions for Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering Books - part1

    19 Dec 2014 | 6:47 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
  • 4479 Solutions for Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering Books - part2

    19 Dec 2014 | 6:47 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
  • 4479 Solutions for Math, Statistics and Probability Books - part1

    19 Dec 2014 | 6:46 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Big Picture Science

  • Shocking Ideas

    SETI Institute
    15 Dec 2014 | 7:39 am
    Electricity is so 19th century. Most of the uses for it were established by the 1920s. So there’s nothing innovative left to do, right? That’s not the opinion of the Nobel committee that awarded its 2014 physics prize to scientists who invented the blue LED. Find out why this LED hue of blue was worthy of our most prestigious science prize … how some bacteria actually breathe rust … and a plan to cure disease by zapping our nervous system with electric pulses. Guests: •   Siddha Pimputkar – Postdoctoral researcher in the Materials Department of…
  • Living Computers

    SETI Institute
    8 Dec 2014 | 7:37 am
    It’s the most dramatic technical development of recent times: Teams of people working for decades to produce a slow-motion revolution we call computing. As these devices become increasingly powerful, we recall that a pioneer from the nineteenth century – Ada Lovelace, a mathematician and Lord Byron’s daughter – said they would never surpass human ability. Was she right? We consider the near-term future of computing as the Internet of Things is poised to link everything together, and biologists adopt the techniques of information science to program living cells. Plus:…
  • Long Live Longevity

    SETI Institute
    1 Dec 2014 | 7:27 am
    Here’s to a long life – which, on average, is longer today than it was a century ago. How much farther can we extend that ultimate finish line? Scientists are in hot pursuit of the secret to longer life. The latest in aging studies and why there’s a silver lining for the silver-haired set: older people are happier. Also, what longevity means if you’re a tree. Plus, why civilizations need to stick around if we’re to make contact with E.T. And, how our perception of time shifts as we age, and other tricks that clocks play on the mind. Guests: •   Ted…
  • This Land Is Island

    SETI Institute
    24 Nov 2014 | 12:09 am
    There are many kinds of islands. There’s your iconic sandy speck of land topped with a palm tree, but there’s also our home planet – an island in the vast seas of space. You might think of yourself as a biological island … until you tally the number of microbes living outside – and inside – your body. We go island hopping, and consider the Scottish definition of an island – one man, one sheep – as well as the swelling threat of high water to island nations. Also, how species populate islands … and tricks for communicating with…
  • Surfeit of the Vitalest

    SETI Institute
    17 Nov 2014 | 7:04 am
    In the century and a half since Charles Darwin wrote his seminal On the Origin of the Species, our understanding of evolution has changed quite a bit. For one, we have not only identified the inheritance molecule DNA, but have determined its sequence in many animals and plants. Evolution has evolved, and we take a look at some of the recent developments. A biologist describes the escalating horn-to-horn and tusk-to-tusk arms race between animals, and a paleoanthropologist explains why the lineage from chimp to human is no longer thought to be a straight line but, instead, a bush. Also, New…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    StarDate Online

  • More Moon and Saturn

    damonddb
    18 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Norse gods had a big problem. The wolf known as Fenrir — the offspring of the nasty god Loki — was getting so big that they couldn’t control him. So they tied him up with the world’s strongest chain, and propped his mouth open with a sword. At the end of the cycle of time, though, when the cosmos was destroyed then reborn, he escaped, devouring everything in his path — including Odin, the king of the gods. Fenrir is commemorated in the name of one of the moons of Saturn, which was discovered 10 years ago this month. The moons were found by a team led by Scott Sheppard. The…
  • Moon and Saturn

    damonddb
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A bare wisp of a crescent Moon shines down on the planet Saturn at dawn tomorrow. Saturn is close to the lower left of the Moon, and looks like a bright golden star. If you remove its beautiful rings, Saturn itself looks a bit bland — like a slightly flattened beachball colored in bands of yellow, tan and white. The bands are formed by clouds. Saturn is a big ball of gas that spins rapidly, so the clouds are stretched into bands that completely encircle the planet. If you look at those bands more closely, though, Saturn takes on a painterly appearance, like the works of a great…
  • Impressions of a Planet

    damonddb
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Bands of clouds, whirling storms, and a hexagonal ring near the planet's pole make this image of Saturn snapped by the Cassini spacecraft look like the work of a great Impressionist painter. Saturn's atmosphere is topped by clouds that are stretched into globe-circling bands by the planet's fast rotation. The large storm systems in this image are as big as the United States, and most are created by the interplay between cloud bands. [NASA/JPL/SSI] Text ©2014 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate…
  • Distant Neighbors

    damonddb
    16 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    It’s lonely out beyond the edge of the galaxy. The nearest neighbors would be hundreds if not thousands of light-years away. About the only thing in sight, in fact, would be the hazy disk of the Milky Way, glowing like a small, cloudy slash across the dark sky. The Milky Way’s disk spans about a hundred thousand light-years. We see its outline as a hazy band of light across a dark night sky. But most of the galaxy’s mass is found outside the disk, in a huge volume of space known as the halo. It consists mostly of invisible dark matter, but it also contains a smattering of stars. The…
  • Moon and Spica

    damonddb
    15 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    You don’t need big telescopes or electronic instruments to learn about the universe. Sometimes, you can learn a great deal with not much more than your eyes alone. 2200 years ago, for example, the Greek astronomer Hipparchus learned that the stars change position relative to the Sun from year to year. He did so by measuring the position of Spica, the brightest star of Virgo. Spica is in good view in the east at dawn tomorrow, close to the upper right of the crescent Moon. During a lunar eclipse, Hipparchus measured the angle from Spica to the middle of the Moon. And from that, he calculated…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • New Comet: P/2014 X1 (ELENIN)

    Team
    13 Dec 2014 | 4:42 pm
    CBET nr. 4034, issued on 2014, December 14, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18) by Leonid Elenin on three CCD images taken on 2014, December 12 with a 0.4-m f/3 astrograph at the ISON-NM Observatory near Mayhill, NM, USA. The new comet has been designated P/2014 X1 (ELENIN).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 120-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, December 12.4 from H06 (iTelescope network - Mayhill) through a 0.43-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, under bad seeing conditions,…
  • New Comet: C/2014 W2 (PANSTARRS)

    Team
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:49 am
    CBET nr. 4019, issued on 2014, November 21, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18.7) by PANSTARRS survey in four w-band CCD exposures taken with the 1.8-m Pan-STARRS1 telescope at Haleakala on Nov. 17. The new comet has been designated C/2014 W2 (PANSTARRS).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp.  Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 120-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, November 18.9 from I89 (iTelescope network - Nerpio) through a 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD, shows that this object is a comet: diffuse coma about 6" in…
  • PHILAE HAS LANDED!

    Team
    13 Nov 2014 | 3:58 am
    On 12 November 2014, Philae landed of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Actually looks like Philae landed 3 times on the comet's surface. In fact, magnetic field data from Philae’s ROMAP instrument revealed it touched the surface on  15:33UT, 17:26 and 17:33 UTC. In the weak gravity of the comet the first bounce took about 2 hours and now the lander is thought to be about 1 km away from the original landing site. Below you can find a selection of the most important images (click on each image for a bigger version) & info arriving from Philae and Rosetta in these exciting hours. For…
  • Possible Supernova in M61 (NGC 4303)

    Team
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:44 am
    Following the posting on the Central Bureau's Transient Object Confirmation Page about a possible Supernova in the barred spiral galaxy Messier 61 (or NGC 4303 - TOCP Designation: PSN J12215757+0428185) we performed some follow-up of this object through a 0.10-m f/5.0 astrograph + CCD from MPC Code H06 (iTelescope, New Mexico). On our images taken on October 30.5, 2014 we can confirm the presence of an optical counterpart with unfiltered CCD magnitude 13.2 and at coordinates:R.A. = 12 21 57.61, Decl.= +04 28 17.8(equinox 2000.0; UCAC-3 catalogue reference stars).   Our…
  • Close Approach of Asteroid 2014 SC324

    Team
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    The asteroid 2014 SC324 was discovered (at ~ magnitude +21.4) on 2014, September 30.2 by Mt. Lemmon Survey (MPC code G96) with a 1.5-m reflector + CCD. 2014 SC324 has an estimated size of 40 m - 90 m (based on the object's absolute magnitude H=24.1) and it will have a close approach with Earth at about 1.5 LD (Lunar Distances = ~384,000 kilometers) or 0.0038 AU (1 AU = ~150 million kilometers) at 1921 UT on 2014, October 24. This asteroid will reach the peak magnitude about +13.6 at close approach.We performed some follow-up measurements of this object on 2014, October 24.3 remotely from…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    365 Days of Astronomy

  • Dec 19th: The Accelerating Universe

    avivah yamani
    19 Dec 2014 | 4:29 am
    Podcaster: Brian P. Schmidt at ICMNS public lecture
  • Dec 18th: New Horizons Mission to Pluto

    avivah yamani
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:30 am
    Podcaster:  The Telescope Man, a.k.a. Joe Lalumia & Dr. Allan Stern Title: Beginner Astronomy Class: New Horizons Mission to Pluto Organization:  Telescope Man Link :  Joe’s website: www.telescopeman.org Original file: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vSLX1y799o Description:  Our Guest Speaker will be Dr. Alan Stern, planetary scientist, space program executive, aerospace consultant, and author. He will be presenting”New Horizons to Planet […]
  • Dec 17th: MoonBots

    avivah yamani
    17 Dec 2014 | 4:38 am
    Podcaster: Nicole Gugliucci, Georgia Bracey Guest: Steven Canvin Description: This week we'll talk with Steven Canvin from Moonbots. Learning Space is a weekly Hangout on Air about topics in astronomy education, outreach, and other ways to share science. We bring you interviews, hands-on demonstrations, lists of our favorite resources and more.
  • Dec 16th: Science Discussions

    avivah yamani
    16 Dec 2014 | 5:18 am
    Podcaster: Nicole Gugliucci, Kortney Hogan, Richard Drumm & Michael Foerster
  • Dec 15th: Jocelyn Bell Burnell

    avivah yamani
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:40 am
    Podcaster: Fraser Cain & Dr Pamela Gay
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Internet Archive

  • Old Band 1964 Short

    4 Dec 2014 | 6:15 pm
    The People- a band from the 1960s. I played rhythm guitar..This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Metadata, Ogg Vorbis, PNG, Spectrogram, VBR MP3
  • Dstar Audio K5TIT Net

    9 Mar 2014 | 6:24 pm
    TelescopeMan records part of the K5TIT Dstar repeater net on Sunday, March 9, 2014. Notice the good quality audio from ham radio operators located all around Texas and Oklahoma checking into the Net.Dstar- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-STARwww.telescopeman.orgwww.telescopeman.infowww.telescopeman.u....This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Metadata, Ogg Vorbis, PNG, VBR MP3
  • March 2014 Observing List

    7 Mar 2014 | 2:09 pm
    TelescopeMan gives his observing list for March 2014. Remember to adjust your viewing angle above the horizon- TelescopeMan lives at 32 degrees North, by 96 degrees West. UTC -6Music is by Snowflake under a Creative Commons license....This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Metadata, Ogg Vorbis, PNG, VBR MP3
  • JT 65 digital signal sound

    14 Feb 2014 | 5:55 pm
    TelescopeMan records a short segment of JT65 a digital transmission mode in the amateur radio hobby..This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Metadata, Ogg Vorbis, PNG, VBR MP3
  • GOBs 2a

    30 Jan 2014 | 4:31 pm
    40 meter amateur radio recording of the Good Ole Boys net on 7.279 from January 30, 2014.Recording will demonstrate the receive audio on this band. Make note of the location of each person (call sign and city) checking into the net....This item has files of the following types: Archive BitTorrent, Metadata, Ogg Vorbis, PNG, VBR MP3
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • Chandra Weighs Most Massive Galaxy Cluster in Distant Universe

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have made the first determination of the mass and other properties of a very young, distant galaxy cluster. The Chandra study shows that the galaxy cluster, seen at the comparatively young age of about 800 million years, is the most massive known cluster with that age or younger. As the largest gravitationally- bound structures known, galaxy clusters can act as crucial gauges for how the Universe itself has evolved over time. The galaxy cluster was originally discovered using ESA’s XMM-Newton observatory and is located about 9.6 billion…
  • SpaceX Resupply Mission to Space Station Slips to January

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Dec 2014 | 11:30 am
    NASA and SpaceX announced Thursday the launch of SpaceX's fifth commercial resupply services mission (CRS-5) to the International Space Station now will occur no earlier than Tuesday, Jan. 6. The new launch date will provide SpaceX engineers time to investigate further issues that arose from a static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket on Dec. 16 and will avoid beta angle constraints for berthing the Dragon cargo ship to the station that exist through the end of the year. A beta angle is the position of the sun relative to mechanical structures on the space station. During the time of high beta…
  • NASA Delays Asteroid Redirect Mission Concept Selection

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:53 am
    NASA's efforts to capture a near-Earth asteroid and tow it back to the lunar orbit will have to wait a little bit longer for a final mission concept. In a teleconference Wednesday, Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot told reporters he needed more information before he could select one of two options NASA is considering for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The decision is now expected to be made early next year, with a Mission Concept Review, or MCR, scheduled for late February. "While I expected to make a decision today, we really got to the point where I needed to get some more…
  • India Successfully Launches its Heaviest Rocket GSLV Mark-III, Tests Crew Module

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    18 Dec 2014 | 3:07 pm
    The first experimental flight of India's next generation launch vehicle GSLV Mk-III was successfully conducted today from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Also known as LVM3-X/CARE, this suborbital experimental mission was intended to test the vehicle performance during the critical atmospheric phase of its flight and thus carried a passive (non-functional) cryogenic upper stage. The mission began with the launch of GSLV Mk-III at 9:30 am IST from the Second Launch Pad as scheduled and about five and a half minutes later, carried its payload - the 3775 kg Crew Module Atmospheric…
  • Signs of Europa Plumes Remain Elusive in Search of Cassini Data

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:22 pm
    A fresh look at data collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its 2001 flyby of Jupiter shows that Europa’s tenuous atmosphere is even thinner than previously thought and also suggests that the thin, hot gas around the moon does not show evidence of plume activity occurring at the time of the flyby. The new research provides a snapshot of Europa's state of activity at that time, and suggests that if there is plume activity, it is likely intermittent. The Europa results are being presented today at the American Geophysical Union fall meeting in San Francisco and published in the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Life of Controversy

  • Nobel Prize 2014 : Chemistry Front Runners & Winners

    Word Smith
    7 Dec 2014 | 11:26 pm
    Dear Readers December is upon us and there is a sense of excitement, a sensation of general electricity in the air and about each and every one of us. Perhaps it’s the rush of serotonin from the expectation of the upcoming Christmas celebrations or better yet the utter thrill of participating in the Feast of Winter Veil. Aahhh the memories, it truly is a time for remembrance, reminiscing and rejoice. But apart from the solstice festivities I am reminded of yet another event that is a combination of December, serotonin and remembrance. Yes! The 2014 Nobel Prize ceremonies are just…
  • Nobel Prize 2014 : Medicine and Physiology Front Runners & Winners

    Word Smith
    22 Nov 2014 | 9:54 am
     Dear ReadersFirstly I apologise for the extensive delay. My grandmother took ill and was hospitalized due to a pulmonary embolism. She’s recovering now, so all’s well that ends well I suppose, if you can call a brush with death being well.  Modern Medicine saved her life and I felt I needed to pay homage, give thanks and acknowledge its journey of continuous improvement and innovation. What more appropriate way is there to achieve this than to recognize the men and women whose unyielding efforts lead to the breakthroughs that improve the overall health of humankind. These…
  • Nobel Prize 2014 : Physics Front Runners & Winners

    Word Smith
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:01 am
    Dear Readers Yes! The Nobel Prize award ceremonies are just a couple of months off and from what I hear it’s going to be dynamite! (Pardon the ill choice of words)The prize winners were announced over the past couple of days as we gear up towards December. I decided to do a series of articles covering the Prize Categories  But where is the controversy? You may ask. Well firstly there will be the controversy as to why I’m writing about this seemingly non-controversial topic thus diverging from the central theme of the blog itself.Secondly competitions themselves are in their…
  • Release the KRAKEN: 20,000 leagues of controversy

    Word Smith
    3 Oct 2014 | 8:17 am
    Dear Readers My love and curiosity of the grandiose ocean realm began the day I picked up Jules Verne’s classic sublime masterpiece where we follow Professor Pierre Arronax as circumstance lands him in the bowels of the infamous Nautilus. Here we encounter the mystifying and frightful wonders of the deep sea and all its inhabitants including the mysterious Captain Nemo as they travel 20,000 leagues under the sea.Although that promo was “the bomb” we are here to talk about another equally thrilling enigma that happened to be one of the most memorable characters in the book. The…
  • HeForShe:The Peaceful Coexistence of the Sexes

    Word Smith
    25 Sep 2014 | 9:31 pm
    Dear Readers I’m sure by now you’ve all seen or heard of the UN pro-gender equality campaign #HeForShe, and especially the very eloquent Emma Watson‘s emotionally stirring speech.   The quiver in her voice I felt emphasized the direness of the situation and served to further strengthen the whole message.  Truly inspiring.This set me off on an exciting, gear crunching thought process. What is sexism derived from?Sexism stems from the biological differences between a male and a female, or in scientific terms the sexual dimorphism that arises due to the DNA…
Log in