Astronomy

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  • Keck

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:07 pm
    Showcasing the Keck telescope and its many capabilities this video was originally produced to give a hat tip to the contributions of the W. M. Keck Foundation including its support for the National Academies’ Keck Futures Initiative. Video
  • Moroccan Meteorite May Be a 4.4-Billion-Year-Old Chunk of Dark Martian Crust

    Universe Today
    Jason Major
    31 Jan 2015 | 2:04 pm
    Global mosaic of Mars showing the dark basaltic Syrtis Major Planus region made from Viking Orbiter images. (NSSDC) Mars is often referred to as the Red Planet. But its signature color is only skin-deep – or, I should say, dust-deep. Beneath its rusty regolith Mars has many other hues and shades as well, from pale greys like those found inside holes drilled by Curiosity to large dark regions that are the result of ancient lava flows. Now, researchers think we may have an actual piece of one of Mars’ dark plains here on Earth in the form of a meteorite that was found in the Moroccan…
  • 2004 BL86's flyby seen from iTelescopes (25 and 28 January 2015)

    Astroblog
    29 Jan 2015 | 4:38 am
    Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86 imaged on 25 January using iTelescope T9 at Siding Siring Observatory. 10x60 second Luminance images stacked using ImageJ and SUMMED. The asteroid is the obvious blob, all the stars are smeared as the scope tracks on the asteroid (the little dots are hot pixels). Click to embiggen.8 of 10 frames from the 25th animated. The stars stream past, the asteroid stays still and the hot pixels drift to the left. Click to embiggen.I manage to track Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86 with the Australian iTelescope T9 the day before closest approach. On the day of closest…
  • cython and fastness

    Hogg's Research
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:42 pm
    Yesterday I put some stolen time into looking at whether we can measure short-period stellar oscillations in long-cadence Kepler data. The point is that Kepler long-cadence data has 30-min exposure times, but stellar oscillations in G dwarfs have 5-ish-min periods. The aperiodicity of Kepler exposures might save the day: In principle the exposing is drifted relative to a periodic exposing by the light-travel-time variations to the Kepler field induced by the Kepler spacecraft orbit. I wrote code to forward-model this and see if we can infer the very short stellar-oscillation periods. It looks…
  • The tell-tale signs of a galactic merger

    Astronomy Cmarchesin
    29 Jan 2015 | 6:15 pm
    PR Image heic1503aHubble image of NGC 7714 PR Image heic1503bWide-field image of NGC 7714 (ground-based image) VideosPR Video heic1503aPanning across NGC 7714 PR Video heic1503bZooming in on NGC 7714   The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714. This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape, dragged streams of material out into space, and triggered bright bursts of star formation.NGC 7714 is a spiral galaxy at 100 million light-years from Earth — a…
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    Astronomy News

  • Keck

    Tom
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:07 pm
    Showcasing the Keck telescope and its many capabilities this video was originally produced to give a hat tip to the contributions of the W. M. Keck Foundation including its support for the National Academies’ Keck Futures Initiative. Video
  • Colliding Galaxies

    Tom
    29 Jan 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Hubble captures two galaxies colliding. Image: Credit: NASA and ESA Acknowledgment: A. Gal-Yam (Weizmann Institute of Science) This is an amazing image. Hubblesite has a “zoomable” version of this and I’ve been trying to count the smaller more distant galaxies – I’m at 22 other than the two subjects of the image. This NASA Hubble Space Telescope photo of NGC 7714 presents an especially striking view of the galaxy’s smoke-ring-like structure. The golden loop is made of sun-like stars that have been pulled deep into space, far from the galaxy’s center.
  • Comet Dust

    Tom
    28 Jan 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Dust particles from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko collected by ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft. Copyright ESA/Rosetta/MPS for COSIMA Team MPS/CSNSM/UNIBW/TUORLA/IWF/IAS/ESA/ BUW/MPE/LPC2E/LCM/FMI/UTU/LISA/UOFC/vH&S One of the instruments on board ESA’s Rosetta called COSIMA, short for the COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser one of three dust analysis experiments. Essentially this instrument has a plate for catching dust grains from the comet at fairly low speeds. The dust grains shown above is two of the grains collected and they have yielded some interesting results. I’ll…
  • Latest Ceres Approach Image

    Tom
    27 Jan 2015 | 9:05 pm
    The latest Dawn image of Ceres. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA The dwarf planet Ceres is coming into focus little by little as the Dawn spacecraft approaches. The image above is around 30 percent increase in resolution over Hubble images and we are just beginning to make out details. The light colored spot on the upper part of the planet is looking like a mountain to my untrained eye or it could as easily be a deep and newly formed crater. Dawn will arrive at Ceres in just a couple of weeks and enter orbit on 06 March. If some of you are wondering why Ceres being called a dwarf…
  • Asteroid With a Moon

    Tom
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:05 pm
    Asteroid 2004 BL86 made a relatively close pass yesterday. The asteroid passed about 3.1 lunar distances from Earth or 1.2 million km / 745,000 miles. In cosmic scales that is indeed close. The asteroid is 325 meters / 1,100 feet in diameter, not something we would want to hit us! Scientists used the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone California took took radar images of the asteroid and assembled 20 of them into this video and look at what they found – the asteroid has a moon! Actually about 16 percent of the near-Earth population of asteroids of 200 meters in diameter (655 feet)…
 
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    Universe Today

  • Moroccan Meteorite May Be a 4.4-Billion-Year-Old Chunk of Dark Martian Crust

    Jason Major
    31 Jan 2015 | 2:04 pm
    Global mosaic of Mars showing the dark basaltic Syrtis Major Planus region made from Viking Orbiter images. (NSSDC) Mars is often referred to as the Red Planet. But its signature color is only skin-deep – or, I should say, dust-deep. Beneath its rusty regolith Mars has many other hues and shades as well, from pale greys like those found inside holes drilled by Curiosity to large dark regions that are the result of ancient lava flows. Now, researchers think we may have an actual piece of one of Mars’ dark plains here on Earth in the form of a meteorite that was found in the Moroccan…
  • NASA Launches Revolutionary Earth Science Satellite Measuring Soil Moisture Cycle

    Ken Kremer
    31 Jan 2015 | 10:52 am
    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory, on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket, is seen after the mobile service tower was rolled back Friday, Jan. 30 at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls At dawn this morning (Jan. 31) NASA launched an advanced Earth science satellite aimed at making measurements of our planet’s surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw states from space that will revolutionize our understanding of the water, energy, and carbon cycles driving all life on Earth. NASA’s new Soil Moisture Active…
  • Awesome New Radar Images of Asteroid 2004 BL86

    Bob King
    31 Jan 2015 | 10:26 am
    New video of 2004 BL86 and its moon Newly processed images of asteroid 2004 BL86 made during its brush with Earth Monday night reveal fresh details of its lumpy surface and orbiting moon. We’ve learned from both optical and radar data that Alpha, the main body, spins once every 2.6 hours. Beta (the moon) spins more slowly. The images were made by bouncing radio waves off the surface of the bodies using NASA’s 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif.  Radar “pinging” reveals information about the shape, velocity, rotation rate and…
  • It Looks Like an Asteroid Strike Can’t Cause a Worldwide, Dinosaur-Killing Firestorm

    Nancy Atkinson
    30 Jan 2015 | 2:28 pm
    Computer generated simulation of an asteroid strike on the Earth. Credit: Don Davis/AFP/Getty Images For decades, scientists have debated the cause of the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs and other life 65 million years ago. While the majority of researchers agree that a massive asteroid impact at Chicxulub, Mexico is the culprit, there have been some dissenters. Now, new research is questioning just a portion of the asteroid/Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction scenario. While the scientists involved in the study don’t doubt that such an asteroid impact actually happened, their…
  • Weekly Space Hangout – Jan. 30, 2015: Paul Hildebrandt Fights for Space!

    Fraser Cain
    30 Jan 2015 | 12:01 pm
    Host: Fraser Cain (@fcain) Guests: Ramin Skibba (@raminskibba) Dave Dickinson (@astroguyz / www.astroguyz.com) Special Guest: Paul Hildebrandt from Fight For Space (...)Read the rest of Weekly Space Hangout – Jan. 30, 2015: Paul Hildebrandt Fights for Space! (337 words) © Fraser for Universe Today, 2015. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: 2004 BL86, 67/P albedo, Aerojet Rocketdyne, Astrophotots, Dragon, J1407b, Mars, meteor, milky way, Moon, NASA, Orion, Saturn, SpaceX, XPrize Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
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    Astroblog

  • 2004 BL86's flyby seen from iTelescopes (25 and 28 January 2015)

    29 Jan 2015 | 4:38 am
    Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86 imaged on 25 January using iTelescope T9 at Siding Siring Observatory. 10x60 second Luminance images stacked using ImageJ and SUMMED. The asteroid is the obvious blob, all the stars are smeared as the scope tracks on the asteroid (the little dots are hot pixels). Click to embiggen.8 of 10 frames from the 25th animated. The stars stream past, the asteroid stays still and the hot pixels drift to the left. Click to embiggen.I manage to track Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86 with the Australian iTelescope T9 the day before closest approach. On the day of closest…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday January 29 to Thursday February 5

    27 Jan 2015 | 3:44 am
    The Full Moon is Wednesday February 4. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Mars is just visible in the early evening twilight and is coming closer to Venus. Jupiter is visible in the late evening sky and is visited by the Moon on February 4. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion.The Full Moon is Wednesday February 4. Evening sky on Saturday January 31 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 21:00 (9:00 pm) ACDST in South Australia.  Mars is low in the twilight, with Venus below it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).Venus is…
  • Success! 2004 BL86's flyby seen (26 January 2015)

    26 Jan 2015 | 6:40 am
    My sketch of the flyby of Near Earth Asteroid 2004 from 11:40 ACDST to 11:58 ACDST. 114mm Newtonian with 25 mm Plossel eyepiecePredicted chart of the flyby in SkyMapAfter a busy Australia day of waking up late, walking down the beach to the Australia Day concert to buy ice- creams, a Barbie with friends and watching the fireworks, I set up the telescope to camp out on 11 Puppis to watch the flyby of Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86.And failed utterly. I had misunderstood the orientation of the images in to scope, and by the time I had confirmed which part of the image was north, the asteroid was…
  • UPDATE: Seeing the Close Flyby of NEO 2004 BL86 10 pm 26 January, 2015

    24 Jan 2015 | 4:14 pm
    The position of asteroid 2004 BL68 as seen at 22:00 ACDST on the evening of 26 January 2015 from Adelaide. Similar views will be seen at 22:30 AEDST and 21:30 AEST. Click to embiggenApproximate binocular view of asteroid 2004 BL68 as seen at 22:00 and 23:00 ACDST on the evening of 26 January 2015 from Adelaide. Similar views will be seen at 22:30  and 23:30 AEDST and 21:30- 22:30  AEST. Click to embiggenIn my previous article on 2004 BL86 I explained in detail how to see this NEO at its brightest ... at around 4:30 am in the morning when it is close to the bright open cluster M48.
  • I'm on the Radio this Sunday January 25, 2015

    24 Jan 2015 | 5:01 am
    The position of asteroid 2004 BL68 as seen at astronomical twilight on the morning of 27 January 2015 (4:50 am ACDST, one and a half hours after sunset) from Adelaide. Click to embiggen On the morning  of Sunday 25 January I'll be on ABC local radio (Adelaide 891 AM) with Ashley Walsh, going live around 11:40 am ACDST (11:10 AEDST, 10:10 AEST). I'll be talking about the close flyby of Near Earth Asteroid 2004 BL86 and how to see it and what's coming up in 2015. So listen if you can (they doing streaming, so even if you are not in Adelaide you can catch this on your computer).
 
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    Hogg's Research

  • cython and fastness

    31 Jan 2015 | 7:42 pm
    Yesterday I put some stolen time into looking at whether we can measure short-period stellar oscillations in long-cadence Kepler data. The point is that Kepler long-cadence data has 30-min exposure times, but stellar oscillations in G dwarfs have 5-ish-min periods. The aperiodicity of Kepler exposures might save the day: In principle the exposing is drifted relative to a periodic exposing by the light-travel-time variations to the Kepler field induced by the Kepler spacecraft orbit. I wrote code to forward-model this and see if we can infer the very short stellar-oscillation periods. It looks…
  • p(z)

    30 Jan 2015 | 8:59 pm
    At group meeting, Malz discussed this paper by Sheldon et al, which obtains a redshift distribution and individual-object photometric redshifts from photometric data and a heterogeneous training set of objects with spectroscopic redshifts. The Sheldon paper (which refers to the Cunha method) is an example of a likelihood-free inference, in that it creates a redshift distribution and posteriors for redshift for individual objects without ever giving a likelihood function. This is good, in a way, because it doesn't require parameterizing galaxy spectral energy distributions. But it is bad,…
  • AAAC, day 2

    29 Jan 2015 | 6:14 pm
    Today was the second day of the AAAC meeting in DC; I participated remotely from NYC. The most interesting discussions of the day were around proposal pressure and causes for low proposal acceptance rates (around 15 percent for most proposal categories at NSF and NASA). The number of proposals to the agencies is rising while budgets are flat or worse (for individual-investigator grants at NSF they are declining because of increasing costs of facilities). The question is: What is leading to the increase in proposal submissions? It is substantial; something like a factor of three over the…
  • AAAC, day 1

    28 Jan 2015 | 7:43 pm
    Today was a meeting in Washington, DC of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee that advises NSF, NASA, and the DOE on their overlapping interests in astronomy and astrophysics. A few highlights were the following:NASA plans to start studies of some of the top mission concepts for big missions that might be put forward to the decadal survey in 2020. That is, they want the community to go into the 2020 decadal process with some really well researched and feasible, ambitious missions. The white-paper describing all this is here (PDF) and deserves reading and comment by the community.
  • K2 search

    27 Jan 2015 | 8:12 pm
    I spent most of our snow day doing Center for Data Science administration, but when I got a bit of research time, I worked on Foreman-Mackey's K2 exoplanet search paper. I also had a great phone conversation with Rix about The Cannon, and especially what the next papers should be. We need a refactored code and code release paper (led by Anna Ho, MPIA) and we need to try using The Cannon to diagnose issues with the physical models. We also have to use The Cannon to tie together the stellar parameter "systems" of two (or more) surveys, since this was the whole point of the project, originally.
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    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • The tell-tale signs of a galactic merger

    29 Jan 2015 | 6:15 pm
    PR Image heic1503aHubble image of NGC 7714 PR Image heic1503bWide-field image of NGC 7714 (ground-based image) VideosPR Video heic1503aPanning across NGC 7714 PR Video heic1503bZooming in on NGC 7714   The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714. This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape, dragged streams of material out into space, and triggered bright bursts of star formation.NGC 7714 is a spiral galaxy at 100 million light-years from Earth — a…
  • The polar ring of Arp 230

    29 Jan 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Arp 230 - IC 51Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASAAcknowledgement: Flickr user Det58This Picture of the Week shows Arp 230, also known as IC 51, observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.Arp 230 is a galaxy of an uncommon or peculiar shape, and is therefore part of the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies produced by Halton Arp. Its irregular shape is thought to be the result of a violent collision with another galaxy sometime in the past. The collision could also be held responsible for the formation of the galaxy’s polar ring.The outer ring surrounding the galaxy consists of gas and stars and…
  • Cassini Catches Titan Naked in the Solar Wind

    28 Jan 2015 | 6:10 pm
    This diagram depicts conditions observed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during a flyby in Dec. 2013, when Saturn's magnetosphere was highly compressed, exposing Titan to the full force of the solar wind. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.   › Full image and captionResearchers studying data from NASA's Cassini mission have observed that Saturn's largest moon, Titan, behaves much like Venus, Mars or a comet when exposed to the raw power of the solar wind. The observations suggest that unmagnetized bodies like Titan might interact with the solar wind in the same basic ways, regardless of…
  • Citizen Scientists Lead Astronomers to Mystery Objects in Space

    28 Jan 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Volunteers using the web-based Milky Way Project brought star-forming features nicknamed "yellowballs" to the attention of researchers, who later showed that they are a phase of massive star formation. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.   › Full image and captionThis series of images show three evolutionary phases of massive star formation, as pictured in infrared images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.  › Full image and caption Sometimes it takes a village to find new and unusual objects in space. Volunteers scanning tens of thousands of…
  • The Mouth of the Beast

    28 Jan 2015 | 4:05 am
    PR Image eso1503aVLT image of the cometary globule CG4 PR Image eso1503bThe cometary globule CG4 in the constellation of Puppis    PR Image eso1503cWide-field view of the sky around the cometary globule CG4Videos  PR Video eso1503aZooming in on the cometary globule CG4 PR Video eso1503bPanning over a VLT image of the cometary globule CG4 VLT images cometary globule CG4Like the gaping mouth of a gigantic celestial creature, the cometary globule CG4 glows menacingly in this new image from ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Although it appears to be big and bright in this picture, this…
 
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    The Urban Astronomer

  • KFOG Broadcast: January 21, 2015

    21 Jan 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Had a good show with Renee, Irish Greg and No Name at KFOG. The Morning Show is always a lot of fun, with twists and turns along the way. We talked about Astronomy apps, Aliens, Star Parties, Orion, Comet Lovejoy, Pluto and New Horizons, and more. Click here to listen.
  • Moon and Venus in the West

    20 Jan 2015 | 10:53 pm
    lender Moon and VenusWednesday January 21st, a very slender young Moon and Venus form a compact group immediately after sunset. You'll need binoculars to spot this grouping, as the thin crescent Moon will be easily lost in the glare of the sunset sky, but bright Venus should be easier to spot. There's something magic about the sight of the thin crescent Moon, just barely glowing as a small bit of its illuminated side is visible to us, and that small light has to be seen through the glowing atmosphere with the refracted sunlight still filtering through it.In San Francisco, the Sun sets around…
  • Close Encounters

    9 Jan 2015 | 3:19 pm
    Close EncountersThe evening sky features a close encounter with the two inner planets, Venus and Mercury. When two celestial objects align, the visual effect is usually quite brilliant. Venus is 100s of times brighter than smaller and more distant Mercury, but nonetheless the two make an impressive pair this weekend. You'll need a clear view to the south-west just after sunset. Binoculars will make it faster and easier to locate the pair. The two planets will remain in close proximity for several days. And next week, the old Moon and Saturn will also have a close encounter. There's always…
  • Comet Lovejoy arrives in the night sky

    4 Jan 2015 | 9:11 am
    Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy has arrived in the night sky for viewers in the Northern Hemisphere, and in the coming days promises to be a fine sight especially through binoculars or a telescope, shimmering in green light with a slight tail. The comet is on a trajectory around the Sun and will pass nearest to Earth on January 7th, but given the geometry of its path, it will be ideally placed for viewing over the next few weeks as it rises high into the southern sky and as the Moon moves from Full to Waning phase. The finder chart, courtesy of Sky & Telescope, shows the…
  • The "Zero G Day" Hoax

    25 Dec 2014 | 1:02 pm
    Fake tweetI enjoy the occasional science hoax, and the resurgence of the "Zero G Day" hoax brings a smile to my face. It is a claim that on January 4th, 2015 at 9:47 PST, gravity on Earth will be momentarily diminished due to an alignment of Pluto and Jupiter. There is just enough science in the claim to make many believe it could be true, but in fact it's far from the truth, just a fun prank started by the astronomer Patrick Moore years ago. Nonetheless, if thousands of people jump at that moment, we can test out the theory that the Earth might move if everyone jumped at once, a scientific…
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    sci.astro

  • Re: THE SPEED OF LIGHT IS NOT A CONSTANT

    31 Jan 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Light in vacuum can be slowed but Divine Albert's Divine Theory remains unaffected: http://skullsinthestars.com/2015/01/31/so-whats-up-with-that-slower-than-light-light/ "There is no fundamental rewriting of Einstein's relativity or even, in general, significant changes to the speed of light. (...
  • Re: Do the Milky way rotate vs the faraway fixstars, galaxies, nebulosas?

    29 Jan 2015 | 2:47 pm
    To answer the qustion in the subject line, "for spiral galaxy disks, yes, but not as a rigid body."  Except near the galactic center, the stars rotate with roughly constant _linear_ speed, meaning the "galactic year" increases linearly with radius. One resource I've recommended before is at http://
  • Re: EINSTEINIANS TEACH THE WORLD

    29 Jan 2015 | 5:27 am
    http://www.livescience.com/49627-quantum-experiment-demonstrates-relativity.html January 29, 2015 "Most famous is the Michelson-Morely experiment in 1887, which bounced two light beams between mirrors and showed the speed of light was constant - there was no change in the interference pattern no ma
  • Re: THE SPEED OF LIGHT IS NOT A CONSTANT

    27 Jan 2015 | 5:35 pm
    http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/417655/scitech/science/exclusive-this-pinay-physicist-can-slow-down-light-without-touching-it "Although the maximum speed of light is a cosmological constant - made famous by Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity and E=mc^2 - it can, in fact, be slowed down: t
  • Re: Do the Milky way rotate vs the faraway fixstars, galaxies, nebulosas?

    27 Jan 2015 | 12:31 pm
    Face it you have a to weak mind for the subject.
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    uk.sci.astronomy

  • 4502 Solutions for Materials Engineering Books

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:42 pm
    Solutions Manuals & Test Banks _______________________________ contact to :           matt...@gmail.com                      mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com Are available a lot of solution manuals/test banks (it is just a partial list). Then if you need one solutions manual just send me an email. Ch
  • 4502 Solutions for Mechanics, Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering Books

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:42 pm
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA, N
  • 4502 Solutions for Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering Books - part1

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:41 pm
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
  • 4502 Solutions for Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering Books - part2

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:40 pm
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
  • 4502 Solutions for Math, Statistics and Probability Books - part1

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:30 pm
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to :         matt...@gmail.com                     mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com NOTE :  "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR :   CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA,
 
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    Big Picture Science

  • Skeptic Check: Mummy Dearest

    SETI Institute
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:52 am
    ENCORE  Shh …mummy’s the word! We don’t want to provoke the curse of King Tut. Except that there are many curses associated with this fossilized pharaoh – from evil spirits to alien malevolence. So it’s hard to know which one we’d face. We’ll unravel secrets about the famous young pharaoh, including the bizarre events that transpired after the discovery of his tomb in the Valley of the Kings, and learn what modern imaging reveals about life 3,000 years ago. Plus, we dispel myths about how to make a mummy, while learning the origin of that…
  • Big Questions Somewhat Answered

    SETI Institute
    19 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Here are questions that give a cosmologist – and maybe even you – insomnia: What happened after the Big Bang? What is dark matter? Will dark energy tear the universe apart? Let us help you catch those zzzzs. We’re going to provide answers to the biggest cosmic puzzlers of our time. Somewhat. Each question is the focus of new experiments that are either underway or in the queue. Hear the latest results in the search for gravitational waves that would be evidence for cosmic inflation, as well as the hunt for dark matter and dark energy. And because these questions are bigger…
  • How to Talk to Aliens

    SETI Institute
    12 Jan 2015 | 7:42 am
    "Dear E.T. …” So far, so good. But now what? Writing is never easy, but what if your task was to craft a message to aliens living elsewhere in the universe, and your prose would represent all humankind? Got writer’s block yet? What to say to the aliens was the focus of a recent conference in which participants shifted their attentions away from listening for extraterrestrial signals to transmitting some. In this show, we report on the “Communicating Across the Cosmos” conference held at the SETI Institute in December 2014. Find out what scientists think we…
  • Meet Your Replacements

    SETI Institute
    5 Jan 2015 | 7:34 am
    ENCORE There’s no one like you. At least, not yet. But in some visions of the future, androids can do just about everything, computers will hook directly into your brain, and genetic human-hybrids with exotic traits will be walking the streets. So could humans become an endangered species? Be prepared to meet the new-and-improved you. But how much human would actually remain in the humanoids of the future? Plus, tips for preventing our own extinction in the face of inevitable natural catastrophes. Guests: •   Robin Hanson – Associate professor of economics, George…
  • Skeptic Check: Got a Sweet Truth?

    SETI Institute
    29 Dec 2014 | 7:37 am
    ENCORE  The sweet stuff is getting sour press. Some researchers say sugar is toxic. A new study seems to support that idea: mice fed the human equivalent of an extra three sodas a day become infertile or die. But should cupcakes be regulated like alcohol? Hear both sides of the debate. Another researcher says that animal studies are misleading, and that, for good health, you should count calories, not candy and carbs. Plus, an investigative reporter exposes the tricks that giant food companies employ to keep you hooked on sugar, salt, and fat. It’s Skeptic Check … but…
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    StarDate Online

  • Celestial Equator

    damonddb
    30 Jan 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Dashing Orion, the hunter, climbs high across the south this evening. Look for his three-star belt, which forms a short diagonal line. The star at the top of the belt lies almost directly atop the celestial equator — the projection of Earth’s equator into the sky. Just as the equator separates Earth into northern and southern hemispheres, the celestial equator separates the great sphere of the sky into two halves. From Earth’s equator, you can see both halves. All that’s missing are the stars that are quite near the celestial poles. Polaris, which marks the north pole, would be right…
  • Beautiful Disruption

    damonddb
    30 Jan 2015 | 8:32 pm
    This Hubble Space Telescope view of NGC 7714 shows the aftermath of a galactic fender-bender. The spiral galaxy side-swiped another (which is out of view), pulling out great streamers of stars (the yellow-orange swirls) and triggering the birth of millions of new stars, which form bright blue strands. Many of the newly born stars are much more massive than the Sun, so they quickly lose much of their material through strong winds. The galaxy is about 100 million light-years away. [ESA/NASA/A. Gal-Yam (Weizmann Institute of Science] Text ©2015 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald…
  • Winter Circle

    damonddb
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The Moon passes through the middle of one of the largest “asterisms” in the sky the next couple of nights: the Winter Circle. It contains several of the night sky’s brightest stars. But it’s so spread out that it’s hard to take in all at once. An asterism is a pattern of stars that forms a distinctive shape or picture. It can be within a single constellation, or it can cross over constellation boundaries. The Winter Circle is in the latter category — it encompasses stars in six constellations. It spans about five times the width of your open hand held at arm’s length. Tonight,…
  • Meteor Plots

    damonddb
    28 Jan 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Several weak meteor showers rain into the night sky at this time of year — showers with names like the Alpha Corona Borealids and the February Eta Draconids. They’re all puny, but they add up. Under dark skies, you can expect to see a handful of meteors just about any night of the year. Astronomers have identified almost 600 possible meteor showers. Only a few produce enough “shooting stars” to make them worth mentioning. But even if they don’t have aesthetic value, they all have scientific value. Every meteor shower is produced by a trail of debris from a comet or asteroid.
  • Getting Closer

    damonddb
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:37 am
    This image, snapped by the Dawn spacecraft on January 25, 2015, is the sharpest yet of Ceres, the largest asteroid. Taken from a range of 147,000 miles (237,000 km), the image shows more detail than even the best taken by Hubble Space Telescope. Dawn will draw closer to Ceres over the next few weeks and enter orbit around the little dwarf planet on March 6. [NASA/JPL/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA] Text ©2015 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
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    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • Close Approach of Asteroid (357439) 2004 BL86

    Team
    23 Jan 2015 | 7:26 am
    The asteroid (357439) 2004 BL86 was discovered  (at ~ magnitude +18.6) on 2004, January 30 by Linear Survey (MPC code 704) with a 1.0-m f/2.15 reflector + CCD.Asteroid (357439) 2004 BL86 has an estimated size of 420 m - 940 m (based on the object's absolute magnitude H=19.0) and it will have a close approach with Earth at about 3.1 LD (Lunar Distances = ~384,000 kilometers) or 0.0080 AU (1 AU = ~150 million kilometers) on 2015, January 26 at 16:20UT. This asteroid will reach the peak magnitude about +9.0 between Jan 26 & 27. Astronomers at Goldstone will try to observe it "as the…
  • Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) puts on a show

    Team
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:18 am
    Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was discovered (at magnitude +14.8) by T. Lovejoy (Birkdale, Qld., Australia) on 17 August 2014 on CCD images obtained with a 20-cm f/2.1 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. It is the fifth comet discovered by Terry Lovejoy.On 7 January 2015, comet C/2014 Q2 passed 0.469 AU (1 AU = ~150 million kilometers) from Earth and it will reach the perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on 30 January 2015 at a distance of 1.29 AU from the Sun. Comet Lovejoy reached few days ago its peak brightness at about magnitude +3.8, as bright as it should get, making it a naked-eye object.
  • New Comet: P/2014 X1 (ELENIN)

    Team
    13 Dec 2014 | 4:42 pm
    CBET nr. 4034, issued on 2014, December 14, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18) by Leonid Elenin on three CCD images taken on 2014, December 12 with a 0.4-m f/3 astrograph at the ISON-NM Observatory near Mayhill, NM, USA. The new comet has been designated P/2014 X1 (ELENIN).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 120-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, December 12.4 from H06 (iTelescope network - Mayhill) through a 0.43-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, under bad seeing conditions,…
  • New Comet: C/2014 W2 (PANSTARRS)

    Team
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:49 am
    CBET nr. 4019, issued on 2014, November 21, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18.7) by PANSTARRS survey in four w-band CCD exposures taken with the 1.8-m Pan-STARRS1 telescope at Haleakala on Nov. 17. The new comet has been designated C/2014 W2 (PANSTARRS).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp.  Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 120-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, November 18.9 from I89 (iTelescope network - Nerpio) through a 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD, shows that this object is a comet: diffuse coma about 6" in…
  • PHILAE HAS LANDED!

    Team
    13 Nov 2014 | 3:58 am
    On 12 November 2014, Philae landed of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Actually looks like Philae landed 3 times on the comet's surface. In fact, magnetic field data from Philae’s ROMAP instrument revealed it touched the surface on  15:33UT, 17:26 and 17:33 UTC. In the weak gravity of the comet the first bounce took about 2 hours and now the lander is thought to be about 1 km away from the original landing site. Below you can find a selection of the most important images (click on each image for a bigger version) & info arriving from Philae and Rosetta in these exciting hours. For…
 
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    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • Could a New Proposed Particle Help to Detect Dark Matter?

    Astro
    30 Jan 2015 | 4:19 am
    Researchers at the University of Southampton, UK, have proposed a new fundamental particle which could explain why no one has managed to detect ‘Dark Matter’, the elusive missing 85 per cent of the Universe’s mass. Dark Matter is thought to exist because of its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing (the bending of light rays) around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (the afterglow of the Big Bang). Despite compelling indirect evidence and considerable experimental effort, no one has managed to detect Dark Matter directly.
  • CAT Scan of Nearby Supernova Remnant Reveals Frothy Interior

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Jan 2015 | 4:07 pm
    Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, is one of the most well studied supernova remnants in our galaxy. But it still holds major surprises. Harvard-Smithsonian and Dartmouth College astronomers have generated a new 3-D map of its interior using the astronomical equivalent of a CAT scan. They found that the Cas A supernova remnant is composed of a collection of about a half dozen massive cavities - or 'bubbles'. "Our three-dimensional map is a rare look at the insides of an exploded star," says Dan Milisavljevic of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). This research is being…
  • The Tell-tale Signs of a Galactic Merger

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Jan 2015 | 3:43 pm
    The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714. This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape, dragged streams of material out into space, and triggered bright bursts of star formation. NGC 7714 is a spiral galaxy at 100 million light-years from Earth — a relatively close neighbour in cosmic terms. The galaxy has witnessed some violent and dramatic events in its recent past. Tell-tale signs of this brutality can be seen in NGC 7714's strangely shaped arms, and in…
  • LOFAR’s Record-sharp Image Gives Astronomers a New View of Galaxy M82

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Jan 2015 | 2:34 pm
    An international team of astronomers, including ASTRON (Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy) scientists, used the giant radio telescope LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) to create the sharpest astronomical image ever taken at very long radio wavelengths. Made by observing simultaneously from four countries, the image shows the glowing centre of the galaxy Messier 82 - and many bright remnants of supernova explosions. Astronomers have taken the sharpest image yet of the sky at very long radio wavelengths. The image shows the centre of the galaxy Messier 82 (M82), also known as the Cigar…
  • NASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Releases 2014 Annual Report

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Jan 2015 | 2:00 pm
    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP), an advisory committee that reports to NASA and Congress, has issued its 2014 annual report examining NASA's safety performance over the past year and highlighting accomplishments, issues and concerns to agency and government officials. The report, released Wednesday, is based on the panel's 2014 fact-finding and quarterly public meetings; "insight" visits and meetings; direct observations of NASA operations and decision-making processes; discussions with NASA management, employees and contractors; and the panel members' own experience. The panel…
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    Life of Controversy

  • Phraseology: "Calling Shotgun"

    Word Smith
    11 Jan 2015 | 10:03 pm
    Dear readersWelcome to first installment ofIt is in human nature to take for granted the things we use, the people we associate, and the phrases we say. Too long have we tossed around words like “sorry”, “love” and “mazletov” without giving a single thought to the weight the carry. But it is one particular phrase, impenitently caterwauled by every dense jock, dumb blonde and dim frat boy, which we have chosen to enlighten the populace about this day. That notorious phrase is “Calling Shotgun”It infuriates me when I see the dull gleam in some ignoramus’ eye, froth…
  • 2015:The Age of the Lightsaber-wielding Jurassic Goat Max of Panem

    Word Smith
    3 Jan 2015 | 8:26 am
    Dear Readers A New Year dawns….………………From Countries to societies to organizations to people, everyone is gearing up and getting ready to face 2015. Filled with new possibilities and plans, new desires and dreams, new aims and ambitions, new goals and resolutions but above all else the new year fills in our hearts the hope for a better future. But what can we expect besides hope? The answer to that, my esteemed readers, lies in the scribblings that have been etched upon the computer screen you view this very instant. United Nations Year DesignationThe UN has anointed…
  • Meet Krampus

    Word Smith
    20 Dec 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Dear ReadersAs I hastily type these words the realization hits me that they may be my last. I can’t help but cast weary glances behind me, as a cold draught claws, persistently at my nape with its chilly clutch. Try as I may, search as I might, its origin remains a mystery in this well insulated house. I hate to admit but I’ve been naughty this year, quite possibly the reason for this feeling of unholy fear, which deepens as Christmas day draws near. Night rode in swiftly on that freezing day as my girlfriend and I snuggled into bed hoping for a pleasant and perennial sleep. Silence…
  • Nobel Prize 2014 : Chemistry Front Runners & Winners

    Word Smith
    7 Dec 2014 | 11:26 pm
    Dear Readers December is upon us and there is a sense of excitement, a sensation of general electricity in the air and about each and every one of us. Perhaps it’s the rush of serotonin from the expectation of the upcoming Christmas celebrations or better yet the utter thrill of participating in the Feast of Winter Veil. Aahhh the memories, it truly is a time for remembrance, reminiscing and rejoice. But apart from the solstice festivities I am reminded of yet another event that is a combination of December, serotonin and remembrance. Yes! The 2014 Nobel Prize ceremonies are just…
  • Nobel Prize 2014 : Medicine and Physiology Front Runners & Winners

    Word Smith
    22 Nov 2014 | 9:54 am
     Dear ReadersFirstly I apologise for the extensive delay. My grandmother took ill and was hospitalized due to a pulmonary embolism. She’s recovering now, so all’s well that ends well I suppose, if you can call a brush with death being well.  Modern Medicine saved her life and I felt I needed to pay homage, give thanks and acknowledge its journey of continuous improvement and innovation. What more appropriate way is there to achieve this than to recognize the men and women whose unyielding efforts lead to the breakthroughs that improve the overall health of humankind. These…
 
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    Telescope Observer

  • Review: Celestron NexStar 130SLT GoTo Telescope

    teladm
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:17 am
    The NexStar 130SLT is a unique reflector telescope from Celestron. The reflector technology uses mirrors to obtain the maximum amount of light possible and therefore to produce images of remarkable clarity, even when located deep in space. In addition, the scope’s relatively large aperture, easy set up and ease of use make it a good […]
  • Review: NexStar 127SLT GoTo Telescope

    teladm
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:12 am
    The NexStar 127SLT is one of Celestron’s line of telescopes designed to ease beginners into the world of stargazing. Characterized by a 127mm aperture and sporting Celestron’s proven SkyAlign technology, this telescope offers consumers good views. In addition, the telescope’s single fork arm and simple design make it easy to set up and use. As […]
  • Review: Celestron NexStar 102SLT GoTo Telescope

    teladm
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:01 am
    The NexStar 102SLT telescope from Celestron offers an appealing combination of simplicity, portability, and durability. Its easy to understand design, combined with its proven durability under heavy usage and its small size make it an ideal telescope for anyone wishing to delve more deeply in the field of stargazing without investing excessive amounts of time […]
  • Review: Celestron NexStar 90SLT GoTo Telescope

    teladm
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:49 am
    The NexStar 90SLT from Celestron is a quality telescope designed for the beginning star gazer. Its low price, excellent basic features, and relative ease of use make it an appealing option for anyone looking to delve into the world of stargazing for the first time. The scope’s beginner status, however, does not compromise the quality […]
  • Review: Celestron NexStar 8SE GoTo Telescope

    teladm
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:29 am
    The NexStar 8SE provides the consumer with a powerful, yet compact, stargazing tool. Its 8-inch aperture and updated technological advancements allow it to capture incredible details from objects in the night sky. Its SkyAlign technology makes it easy for even novices to find and identify these objects, while its clarity and ease of use make […]
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    Stargazing in the UK

  • 10 Interesting Facts about the Solar System for Kids

    Stanley Siekel
    25 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    Although we have been studying it for thousands of years, the Universe never ceases to amaze us. We find out something new and exciting about our solar system every year, and with every new discovery we are one step closer to the question that has been haunting us since the dawn of civilisation: are we alone in the Universe? As complex and puzzling as it may be, our solar system can be easily explained in several simple, fun and entertaining facts, and here you will find the top 10 most interesting facts about the solar system for kids: 1. All Celestial Bodies in Our Solar System Revolve…
  • Top 100 Astronomy Websites in 2015

    Stanley Siekel
    18 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    Hi all, I have put together the following list – my own take on Top 100 space and astronomy websites in 2015. Stargazing beginners and amateur astronomers may find there some helpful and free resources for their favourite hobby. Thanks for sharing this with fellow stargazers! Space.com Combines space exploration, astronomy and technology content with daily news covering space science discoveries, space flight, and technology behind all this. Cloudynights.com Contains reviews of astronomy equipment and accessories prepared by expert and amateur astronomers. N2yo.com Provides web-based…
  • Best Beginner Telescope: Celestron Cosmos 90GT WiFi

    Stanley Siekel
    11 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    Every experienced astronomer knows that having the right telescope is invaluable. Whether you are pursuing astronomy for academic and professional reasons or for pure pleasure, the right telescope is the first step towards success. As such, the first piece of advice which is offered to novice astronomers is “find a good telescope”. Unfortunately, this is easier said and done. If you are an absolute beginner, you may not even know what to look for in a telescope. Luckily for all stargazers, there is one telescope which has been recently described as “the best telescope for beginners”.
  • Night Sky Tonight and This Month: January 2015

    Stanley Siekel
    4 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    Night Sky Tonight Tonight if your skies are clear you may be able to see all five visible planets, i.e. Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury without the help of a telescope. Visible planets in the solar system are readily available to the naked eye and known to us for centuries. These five planets are visible most of the year, but during this season all five are in a position that allows us to view their natural beauty on a single night. You don’t have to stay up all night to catch the action; Mars stays out considerably longer than Venus and Mercury, and can be seen two hours after…
  • Best Astronomy Books for Beginners

    Stanley Siekel
    28 Dec 2014 | 12:00 am
    People have been passionate about stargazing for centuries, and there are thousands of books that aim to offer you a deeper insight into the wonders of the Universe. However, if you are just getting started, then you need several basic yet factual and well-written astronomy books for beginners. Having said that, here you will find four of the most sought-after and recommended astronomy books and also some FREE ones. 1. Turn Left At Orion Written by Dan M. Davis and Guy Consolmagno, Turn Left At Orion is widely regarded as one of the best and most popular astronomy books ever written. In a…
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