Astronomy

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  • The Bright Spots of Ceres

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    21 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    The Dawn mission team has released two more images featuring one of the bright spot areas on the Dwarf Planet Ceres. They are getting more detailed all the time. The images were taken on 16 May 2015 from a distance of 7,200 km / 4,500 miles. The first of the two (above) is almost directly on and the second (click here) is more of an oblique view. It will be interesting to see the topography measurements. The craters around the bright spots do appear to be shallower than in other areas. It could be just perception but in the oblique view there are more “bright areas” and…
  • Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions Remain

    Universe Today
    Bob King
    22 May 2015 | 5:54 am
    Latest image released by NASA of the white spots in the 57-mile-wide crater on the dwarf planet Ceres. Scientists with the Dawn mission believe they’re highly reflective material, likely ice. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA The latest views of Ceres’ enigmatic white spots are sharper and clearer, but it’s obvious that Dawn will have to descend much lower before we’ll see crucial details hidden in this overexposed splatter of white dots. Still, there are hints of interesting things going on here.(...)Read the rest of Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday May 21 to Thursday May 28

    Astroblog
    19 May 2015 | 4:52 am
    The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday May 26. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Jupiter is the brightest object in the evening sky once Venus has set. It is visited by the crescent Moon on the 24t. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion and is easily visible in the evening. Comet C/2015 G2 MASTER is visible in binoculars in the evening.The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday May 26. The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 27th.Early evening sky on Sunday May 24 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 ACST showing Venus,  Jupiter and the crescent…
  • #ArloFest, day 1

    Hogg's Research
    20 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Today was the first day of Landolt Standards & 21st Century Photometry in Baton Rouge, organized by Pagnotta (AMNH) and Clayton (LSU). I came to speak about self-calibration. The day started with a historical overview by Bessel (MSSSO), who gave a lovely talk filled with profiles of the many people who contributed to the development of photometric calibration and magnitude systems. Many of the people he talked about (including himself) have filter systems or magnitude systems named after them! Among the many interesting things he touched on was this paper by Johnson, which I have yet to…
  • Hubble Observes One-of-a-Kind Star Nicknamed 'Nasty' Mass Star and Smaller Companion Create Vast Gas Disk (Artist's Illustration)

    Astronomy Cmarchesin
    22 May 2015 | 4:46 am
    Mass Star and Smaller Companion Create Vast Gas Disk (Artist's Illustration) Artist's Illustration Credit: NASA ESA, and G. Bacon (STScICompass and Scale Image of WR 122 (NaSt1) Credit: NASA ESA, and Z. Levay (STScIAstronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the star is so weird that astronomers have nicknamed it "Nasty 1," a play on its catalog name of NaSt1. The star may represent a brief transitory stage in the evolution of…
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    Astronomy News

  • The Bright Spots of Ceres

    Tom
    21 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    The Dawn mission team has released two more images featuring one of the bright spot areas on the Dwarf Planet Ceres. They are getting more detailed all the time. The images were taken on 16 May 2015 from a distance of 7,200 km / 4,500 miles. The first of the two (above) is almost directly on and the second (click here) is more of an oblique view. It will be interesting to see the topography measurements. The craters around the bright spots do appear to be shallower than in other areas. It could be just perception but in the oblique view there are more “bright areas” and…
  • The Medusa

    Tom
    20 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Astronomers used the ESO’s Very large Telescope in Chile took this “most detailed” image of the Medusa Nebula. The colorful nebula cloud is from the the central star that has puffed off its outer layers, just like our Sun will do far in the future. This nebula is off the “knee” of Pollux in the Gemini constellation. The ESO team put out a wide-field view that is amazingly good and more inline with what you would see in a telescope although way-way better of course. (Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2) It in my opinion pretty hard to see, at least it was for me…
  • Hubble’s E-Book

    Tom
    19 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Source: Hubblesite.org As part of the Hubble 25 Anniversary Celebration, the Hubble team are releasing  e-books among other things including posters, videos, activities (do the Forget Measuring just Fold), presentations. What they have done is create an amazing resource and are adding things all the time. Hubble 25 Find the books (links to the Resources page) by
  • Rare Quasar Quartet

    Tom
    18 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Rare is a good description of finding four quasars at once! That’s just what astronomers using the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii did. The group found the first quadruple quasar group. Image description from Keck: Image of the region of the space occupied by the rare quasar quartet. The four quasars are indicated by arrows. The quasars are embedded in a giant nebula of cool dense gas visible in the image as a blue haze. The nebula has an extent of one million light-years across, and these objects are so distant that their light has taken nearly 10 billion years to reach telescopes on…
  • Kepler Sees Neptune’s Dance

    Tom
    17 May 2015 | 10:05 pm
    Seventy days of Kepler spacecraft observations in the K2 mission provide for a look at Neptune’s dance with a couple of its moons. Neptune appears on Day 15, the moon Triton shows up quite well. The YouTube description says some can see the moon Nereid at 24, I cannot. Video by
 
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    Universe Today

  • Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions Remain

    Bob King
    22 May 2015 | 5:54 am
    Latest image released by NASA of the white spots in the 57-mile-wide crater on the dwarf planet Ceres. Scientists with the Dawn mission believe they’re highly reflective material, likely ice. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA The latest views of Ceres’ enigmatic white spots are sharper and clearer, but it’s obvious that Dawn will have to descend much lower before we’ll see crucial details hidden in this overexposed splatter of white dots. Still, there are hints of interesting things going on here.(...)Read the rest of Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions…
  • SpaceX Dragons Coming and Going at Record Setting Pace

    Ken Kremer
    21 May 2015 | 7:36 pm
    Release of SpaceX-6 Dragon on May 21, 2015 from the International Space Station for Pacific Ocean splashdown later in the day. Credit: NASA/Terry Virts SpaceX Dragons seem to be flying nearly everywhere these days, coming and going at a record pace to the delight and relief of NASA, researchers and the space faring crews serving aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As one Dragon returned to Earth from space today, May 21, another Dragon prepares to soar to space soon. The commercial SpaceX-6 cargo Dragon successfully splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 12:42 p.m. EDT (1642 GMT)…
  • X-37B Air Force Space Plane Launches on 4th Mystery Military Mission and Solar Sailing Test

    Ken Kremer
    20 May 2015 | 12:13 pm
    Blastoff of the X-37B spaceplane on United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket with the OTV-4 AFSPC-5 satellite for the U.S. Air Force at 11:05 a.m. EDT, May 20, 2015 from Space Launch Complex-41. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com Story updated with additional details and photos The X-37B, a reusable Air Force space plane launched today, May 20, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on its fourth mission steeped in mystery as to its true goals for the U.S . military and was accompanied by ten tiny cubesat experiments for NASA and the NRO, including a solar sailing demonstration test for The Planetary…
  • Watch Jupiter Get Blasted by an Iridium Flare

    Nancy Atkinson
    20 May 2015 | 8:26 am
    Cue the “Space Invaders” sound effects! We’ve shared previously how astrophotographer Thierry Legault will travel anywhere to get a unique shot. He took this impressive but fun video of an Iridium 72 satellite flaring and passing in front of Jupiter, traveling to Oostende Beach at the North Sea in Belgium to capture this transit. He took both a wide angle view as well as the telescopic close-up view of Jupiter, and from the vantage point of Earth, it appears as though Jupiter gets blasted by the flare. In the zoomed-in view, even Jupiter’s moons are part of the scene.
  • Hunting LightSail in Orbit

    David Dickinson
    20 May 2015 | 8:10 am
    An artist’s conception of LightSail in low Earth orbit. Image credit: The Planetary Society The hunt is on in the satellite tracking community, as the U.S. Air Force’s super-secret X-37B space plane rocketed into orbit today atop an Atlas V rocket out of Cape Canaveral.  This marks the start of OTV-4, the X-37B’s fourth trip into low Earth orbit. And though NORAD won’t be publishing the orbital elements for the mission, it is sure to provide an interesting hunt for backyard satellite sleuths on the ground.(...)Read the rest of Hunting LightSail in Orbit (919 words) © David…
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    Astroblog

  • The Sky This Week - Thursday May 21 to Thursday May 28

    19 May 2015 | 4:52 am
    The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday May 26. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Jupiter is the brightest object in the evening sky once Venus has set. It is visited by the crescent Moon on the 24t. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion and is easily visible in the evening. Comet C/2015 G2 MASTER is visible in binoculars in the evening.The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday May 26. The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 27th.Early evening sky on Sunday May 24 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 18:30 ACST showing Venus,  Jupiter and the crescent…
  • Aurora Watch (17-18 May)

    16 May 2015 | 4:55 am
    An Aurora watch and a geomagnetic alert has been issued by the Australian  IPS for the 17 to 18th due to an anticipated impact from glancing blow from a Coronal Mass Ejection interacting with a coronal hole solar wind stream. This could translate into aurora at any time during the night time of the 17th to early morning 18th.  Aurora, if they flare up tonight, are likely to be seen only in Tasmania (possibly Victoria).Aurora can occur at any time after nightfall (although around midnight or just after seems to be common). Dark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and…
  • Viewing Comet C/2015 G2 MASTER in the Southern Hemisphere this coming Week

    13 May 2015 | 9:02 am
    The path of comet C/2015 G2 MASTER from 14 to 21 May, looking west as seen from Adelaide at Astronomical twilight (6:50 pm) and hour an a half after sunset. The position of the comet is shown every two days. You will probably need binoculars to see it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at equivalent local times. Click to embiggenAnimation showing the path of the comet from 14-21 May at Astronomical twilight. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at equivalent local times. Click to embiggenPrintable black and white horizon chart facing west an hour and a half after…
  • Aurora Alert NOW (13 May 2015)

    13 May 2015 | 2:30 am
    An Aurora Alert and a geomagnetic alert has been issued by the Australian  IPS for the 13th due to an anticipated impact from a coronal hole solar wind stream. This appears to have hit during daylight hours, but the geomagnetic storm may continue during the evening hours.This could translate into aurora at any time during the 13th. Glows have been reported, but Tasmania is suffering from cloud. Currently, the Kindex is 4 (it's higher in the Hobart magnetometer, but I suspect a glitch), solar wind speed is 535 Km/sec and the direction magnetic field direction is southerly, only -4 nT, but…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday May 14 to Thursday May 21

    12 May 2015 | 7:33 am
    The New Moon is Monday May 18. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky and is visited by the crescent Moon on the 21st. Jupiter is the brightest object in the evening sky once Venus has set. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion and is easily visible in the evening. Mercury is difficult to view in the twilight. Comet C/2015 G2 MASTER is visible in binoculars in the evening.The New Moon is Monday May 18. The Moon is at perigee, when it is closest to the Earth, on the 15th.Evening sky on  Tuesday May 19 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 17:55 (5:55 pm) ACST in South…
 
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    Hogg's Research

  • #ArloFest, day 1

    20 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Today was the first day of Landolt Standards & 21st Century Photometry in Baton Rouge, organized by Pagnotta (AMNH) and Clayton (LSU). I came to speak about self-calibration. The day started with a historical overview by Bessel (MSSSO), who gave a lovely talk filled with profiles of the many people who contributed to the development of photometric calibration and magnitude systems. Many of the people he talked about (including himself) have filter systems or magnitude systems named after them! Among the many interesting things he touched on was this paper by Johnson, which I have yet to…
  • self-calibration for Arlo

    19 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    I got no research time in today until I headed to the airport, where I worked on my presentation to the Landolt Standards & 21st Century Photometry Symposium in honor of Arlo Landolt (LSU). I will be talking about self-calibration, the set of methods that have replaced Landoldt's (amazingly productive and important) standard-star catalogs for the calibration of huge surveys, which can (in principle) now be self-calibrated. I will talk about both the theory and the practice of the self-calibration arts.
  • probabilistic cosmology

    18 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    Boris Leistedt (UCL) showed up for two days of chatting in preparation for his arrival at NYU this coming Fall. We discussed a set of projects in probabilistic cosmology. In one (which I have discussed previously with Fadely), we imagine what it would look like to infer galaxy redshifts from imaging without either a training set or models of galaxy spectral energy distributions. I feel like it might be possible, with the thought experiment being: What if you were given the photometry of the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies? Couldn't you figure out their redshifts without being told their underlying…
  • exoplanet dynamics, sucking

    15 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    In group meeting, Dun Wang talked about astrometric calibration of the GALEX Satellite, and Kat Deck (Caltech) talked about the dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems. She pointed out that we naively expect lots of planets close in period to be locked in resonances, but in fact such resonances are rare, empirically in the Kepler sample. She has explanations for this involving the evolving proto-planetary disk.After lunch, Deck gave the astro seminar, on planetary system stability and the Kepler planets. She discussed chaos, stability, and heuristic stability criteria. One interesting…
  • finding planets with TTVs

    14 May 2015 | 8:59 pm
    In the tiny bit of research time available today, I spoke with Kat Deck (Caltech) and Foreman-Mackey about finding planets with large transit-timing residuals. These signals aren't precisely periodic, so some searches could miss them entirely. Deck has simple models (based on perturbation theory) for the variations, so we can in principle add only a few parameters and capture a large range in possible variations. This might make us much more sensitive to extremely important and interesting systems hiding in existing data.The rest of the day was spent writing our NASA proposal, with the…
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    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • Hubble Observes One-of-a-Kind Star Nicknamed 'Nasty' Mass Star and Smaller Companion Create Vast Gas Disk (Artist's Illustration)

    22 May 2015 | 4:46 am
    Mass Star and Smaller Companion Create Vast Gas Disk (Artist's Illustration) Artist's Illustration Credit: NASA ESA, and G. Bacon (STScICompass and Scale Image of WR 122 (NaSt1) Credit: NASA ESA, and Z. Levay (STScIAstronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the star is so weird that astronomers have nicknamed it "Nasty 1," a play on its catalog name of NaSt1. The star may represent a brief transitory stage in the evolution of…
  • News Center Supernova Hunting with Supercomputers

    20 May 2015 | 8:00 pm
    This computer simulation shows the debris of a Type Ia supernova (brown) slamming into its companion star (blue) at tens of millions of miles per hour. The interaction produces ultraviolet light that escapes as the supernova shell sweeps over the companion, a signal detected by Swift. Credits: UC Berkeley, Daniel Kasen  The graphic depicts a light curve of the newly discovered Type Ia supernova, KSN 2011b, from NASA's Kepler spacecraft. The light curve shows a star's brightness (vertical axis) as a function of time (horizontal axis) before, during and after the star exploded. The white…
  • The Dreadful Beauty of Medusa

    20 May 2015 | 4:43 am
    PR Image eso1520aESO’s Very Large Telescope images the Medusa Nebula PR Image eso1520bThe Medusa Nebula in the constellation of Gemini PR Image eso1520cWide-field view of the sky around the Medusa NebulaVideos  PR Video eso1520aZooming in on the Medusa PR Video eso1520bClose-up pan video showing the Medusa Nebula Astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have captured the most detailed image ever taken of the Medusa Nebula. As the star at the heart of this nebula made its transition into retirement, it shed its outer layers into space, forming this colourful cloud. The…
  • Star formation and magnetic turbulence in the Orion Molecular Cloud

    18 May 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Star formation and magnetic turbulence in the Orion Molecular CloudCopyright: ESA and the Planck Collaboration. Hi-res JPG An annotated version of the image can be found here With blue hues suggestive of marine paradises and a texture evoking the tranquil flow of sea waves, this image might make us daydream of sandy beaches and exotic holiday destinations. Instead, the subject of the scene is intense and powerful, because it depicts the formation of stars in the turbulent billows of gas and dust of the Orion Molecular Cloud.The image is based on data from ESA’s Planck satellite, which…
  • Kepler Observes Neptune Dance with Its Moons NASA Ames Research Center

    17 May 2015 | 8:00 pm
    Seventy days worth of solar system observations from NASA's Kepler spacecraft, taken during its reinvented "K2" mission, are highlighted in this sped-up movie. The planet Neptune appears on day 15, followed by its moon Triton, which looks small and faint. Keen-eyed observers can also spot Neptune's tiny moon Nereid at day 24. Neptune is not moving backward but appears to do so because of the changing position of the Kepler spacecraft as it orbits around the sun. Credits: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/J. RoweNASA's Kepler spacecraft, known for its planet-hunting prowess of other stars, is also…
 
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    The Urban Astronomer

  • Get Involved: Star Parties and Astronomy Lectures

    18 May 2015 | 12:08 am
    Each month, the public is welcome to join regional events affiliated with the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers (SFAA). The club supports local 'star parties' and hosts lectures of deep scientific interest. These events are free and open to the public.SFAA Lectures: Each month, the SFAA club meeting includes a lecture by a prominent astronomer or astrophysicist on a topic of general interest. Topics have included exo-planet research, dark matter, space telescopes, stellar research, and more. Check the SFAA website and join the club on the third Tuesday of each month at the Presidio of San…
  • The Springtime Constellation Bootes and M3

    29 Apr 2015 | 11:24 pm
    Bootes, Arcturus and M3Spring marks the arrival of the constellation Bootes and the brilliant orange giant star Arcturus. Looking east shortly after sunset, Arcturus is immediately visible as the brightest celestial object in that part of the sky, and Bootes is easy to spot alongside the star and bordering the Big Dipper.Bootes is an ancient constellation named for a herdsman, and it's his twin brother that drives the plough in the Big Dipper (as the constellation is referred to as a plough in some cultures). Bootes himself is marked by the familiar pattern to the right, sometimes called an…
  • Brilliant Venus and the Pleiades

    11 Apr 2015 | 10:38 am
    Venus and PleiadesVenus is the dominant celestial object of the evening sky now and for the coming months. As its brilliant light pierces the western sky long after sunset, it is passing near to different areas of interest along the ecliptic, this week passing near the well-known star clusters the Pleiades and the Hyades. These open clusters of stars are very near the ecliptic and as a consequence has many visitors throughout the year. Binoculars bring out the best in the Pleiades and Hyades so if you have a moment look west after sunset and enjoy the spectacle.Image courtesy Sky…
  • Viewing Party for the April 4th Total Lunar Eclipse

    2 Apr 2015 | 9:52 pm
    Total Lunar EclipseThe San Francisco Amateur Astronomers are hosting a public event to view the April 4th Total Lunar Eclipse at Ocean Beach in San Francisco. Details are found in this Press Release and on the SFAA website. And here is some great information and ideas about the eclipse from Sky & Telescope Magazine. We hope to see you in the early morning hours of Saturday April 4th.
  • Total Lunar Eclipses Explained: Videos from NASA and the California Academy of Sciences

    31 Mar 2015 | 9:47 pm
    A picture is worth a thousand words, and a video ten thousand. Here are some excellent video resources that provide solid science and fun learning about Lunar Eclipses:California Academy of Sciences, courtesy of Bing Quock.Science At NASA.NASA Goddard: Understanding Lunar Eclipses
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    sci.astro

  • Re: THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL IN PHYSICS

    21 May 2015 | 11:18 pm
    http://www.cnet.com/au/news/einstein-a-bigger-hero-than-jesus-says-study/ "It seems that the biggest hero in the world is Einstein. As Phys.org reports, he's bigger than Mother Teresa. He's bigger than Martin Luther King Jr. He's bigger than Jesus Christ (he came in sixth)." http://plus.maths.
  • EFFECT WITHOUT CAUSE IN EINSTEIN'S RELATIVITY

    21 May 2015 | 4:45 am
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hanoch-gutfreund/relatively-speaking_1_b_7314788.html Hanoch Gutfreund: "The general theory of relativity predicts that time progresses slower in a stronger gravitational field than in a weaker one." This is a lie of course - general relativity does not predict tha
  • EINSTEIN DIDN'T KNOW WHAT HE WAS DOING

    21 May 2015 | 12:53 am
    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v521/n7552/full/521286a.html Physics: Fighting for time, Nature 521, 286-287 (21 May 2015): "...tensions between Einstein and French philosopher Henri Bergson. Their quarrel about the nature of time is the subject of The Scientist and the Philosopher, a hef
  • Re: REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM IN EINSTEIN'S RELATIVITY

    20 May 2015 | 2:58 am
    It follows from Einstein's 1905 constant-speed-of-light postulate that, in the bug-rivet scenario, the bug is both dead and alive. Einsteinians camouflage the absurdity by introducing two additional absurdities: 1. The rivet shank length miraculously increases beyond its at-rest length. 2. "The
  • REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM IN EINSTEIN'S RELATIVITY

    20 May 2015 | 1:04 am
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reductio_ad_absurdum "Reductio ad absurdum (...) is a common form of argument which seeks to demonstrate that a statement is true by showing that a false, untenable, or absurd result follows from its denial, or in turn to demonstrate that a statement is false by sho
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    uk.sci.astronomy

  • Talk on neutron stars, Southampton in May

    29 Apr 2015 | 7:53 am
    11 May, Dr Diego Altamirano: Tic, Tac, Tic, Tac: predicting explosions on Neutron star surface venue: Southwestern Arms (upstairs room) , 36 Adelaide Rd, St Denys, Southampton, SO17 2HW Time: 19:00 for talk 19:30 to 21:00. Plenty of time for questions and answers . Entry by a purchase at the b
  • 4505 Solutions for Materials Engineering Books

    10 Feb 2015 | 10:05 am
    Solutions Manuals & Test Banks _______________________________ contact to : matt...@gmail.com mattosbw1(at) http://gmail.com Are available a lot of solution manuals/test banks (it is just a partial list). Then if you need one solutions manual just send me an e
  • 4505 Solutions for Industrial Engineering, Business, Accounting, Economics and Finance Books

    10 Feb 2015 | 10:05 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to : matt...@gmail.com mattosbw1(at) http://gmail.com NOTE : "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN THESE COUNTRIES : CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN,
  • 4505 Solutions for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Books

    10 Feb 2015 | 10:04 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact me at : matt...@gmail.com mattosbw1(at)http://gmail.com Are available a lot of solution manuals/test banks (it is just a partial list). Then if you need one solutions manu
  • 4505 Solutions for Environmental Engineering, Earth and Environmental Sciences Books

    10 Feb 2015 | 10:04 am
    List of Solutions Manuals and Test Banks ________________________________________ contact to : matt...@gmail.com mattosbw1(at) http://gmail.com NOTE : "THIS SERVICE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR : CHINA, INDIA, RUSSIA, LEBANON, PAKISTAN, IRAQ, IRAN, PHILIPPINES, NO
 
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    Big Picture Science

  • They Know Who You Are

    SETI Institute
    18 May 2015 | 7:30 am
    You’re a private person. But as long as you’re on-line and have skin and hair, you’re shedding little bits of data and DNA everywhere you go. Find out how that personal information – whether or not it’s used against you – is no longer solely your own. Are your private thoughts next? A security expert shares stories of ingenious computer hacking … a forensic scientist develops tools to create a mug shot based on a snippet of DNA … and from the frontiers of neuroscience: mind reading may no longer be the stuff of sketchy psychics. Guests: •Marc Goodman – Global security…
  • A Fundy Thing Happened

    SETI Institute
    11 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    Get ready for déjà vu as you listen to some of our favorite interviews from the past year. It’s our annual fundraising podcast. Come for the great interviews, stay for the great interviews. Lend us your support along the way.  What’s for dinner? Maybe Soylent. Made by … people! We do a taste test. Then meet your gut microbes. They control your health and even your mood. Get tips on how to talk to aliens, why you should keep an eye on government surveillance, and the future of 3D printing human tissue. Also, why extraordinary beliefs persist – including Holocaust denial – despite…
  • The Evolution of Evolution

    SETI Institute
    4 May 2015 | 7:27 am
    Darwinian evolution is adaptive and slow … millennia can go by before a species changes very much. But with the tools of genetic engineering we can now make radical changes in just one generation. By removing genes or inserting new ones, we can give an organism radically different traits and behaviors. We are taking evolution into our own hands. It all began with the domestication of plants and animals, which one science writer says created civilization. Today, as humans tinker with their own genome, is it possible we will produce Homo sapiens 2.0? Also, what happens to those species who…
  • Invisible Worlds

    SETI Institute
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    ENCORE  You can’t see it, but it’s there, whether an atom, a gravity wave, or the bottom of the ocean … but we have technology that allows us to detect what eludes our sight. When we do, whole worlds open up. Without telescopes, asteroids become visible only three seconds before they slam into the Earth. Find out how we track them long before that happens. Also, could pulsars help us detect the gravity waves that Einstein’s theory predicts? Plus, why string theory and parallel universes may remain just interesting ideas … the story of the woman who mapped the ocean floor … and…
  • Life in Space

    SETI Institute
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:26 am
    Discovering bacteria on Mars would be big news. But nothing would scratch our alien itch like making contact with intelligent life. Hear why one man is impatient for the discovery, and also about the new tools that may speed up the “eureka” moment. One novel telescope may help us find E.T. at home, by detecting the heat of his cities. Also, the father of modern SETI research and how decoding the squeals of dolphins could teach us how to communicate with aliens. Guests: •Lee Billings – Journalist and author of Five Billion Years of Solitude: The Search for Life Among the Stars…
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    StarDate

  • Crowded Skies

    damonddb
    21 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The western evening sky features several bright stars and planets in late May. This view, on May 22, is roughly an hour after sunset, and includes the crescent Moon. The Moon will move up and to the left on succeeding nights as the crescent grows fatter. Text ©2015 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
  • Moon and Companions

    damonddb
    21 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The crescent Moon stands at the middle of a beautiful celestial grouping this evening. That grouping includes the planets Venus and Jupiter — the second- and third-brightest objects in the night sky — and several bright stars. Venus is to the lower right of the Moon. It’s the dazzling “evening star,” so there’s no way to miss it. In fact, it’s so bright that you might mistake it for an approaching airplane with its landing lights turned on. Keep an eye on it for a bit, though, and you’ll see that it doesn’t move — it maintains its position relative to the other…
  • Moon and Venus

    damonddb
    20 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Venus is slowing down. Our closest planetary neighbor takes about 243 Earth days to make a single turn on its axis — far longer than any other planet in the solar system. But observations by Venus-orbiting spacecraft showed that from 1986 to 2012, that time increased by about six-and-a-half minutes. We can’t see the surface of Venus from Earth because the planet is blanketed by clouds. In the 1980s, though, the Magellan spacecraft used radar to peer through the clouds. It mapped thousands of surface features. Scientists used the motions of those features to measure Venus’s rotation rate…
  • Ringfest

    damonddb
    19 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    A massive ring system surrounds a giant planet in the star system J1407, as depicted in this artist's concept. The rings are hundreds of times wider than those of Saturn. A moon that's somewhere between the size of Earth and Mars appears to be embedded in the rings. Most of the ring system may disappear of the next few million years. [Ron Miller] Text ©2015 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
  • Saturn at Opposition III

    damonddb
    19 May 2015 | 10:00 pm
    The planet Saturn is best known for its amazing rings. They span about two-thirds of the distance from Earth to the Moon, and seen from the right angle they can double Saturn’s brightness. If you have a telescope, you can see them yourself right now. Saturn is low in the southeast at nightfall, and looks like a bright golden star. Yet Saturn’s rings are puny compared to those that encircle a planet in the constellation Centaurus. Those rings are hundreds of times wider than Saturn’s — wide enough to span the distance from Earth to the Sun. The system is more than 400 light-years away.
 
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    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • SpaceX's Dragon Spacecraft Splashes Down into the Pacific Ocean

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    21 May 2015 | 4:43 pm
    SpaceX's Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 12:42 p.m. EDT Thursday with almost 3,100 pounds of NASA cargo from the International Space Station, including research on how spaceflight and microgravity affect the aging process and bone health. Dragon is the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return a significant amount of cargo to Earth. It is the U.S. company’s sixth NASA-contracted commercial resupply mission to the station and carried more than two tons of supplies and scientific cargo when it lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in…
  • Japan to Improve Its HTV Cargo Spacecraft

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    21 May 2015 | 3:54 pm
    Japan wants to upgrade its homegrown H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) also known as Kounotori, an automated cargo spacecraft used to resupply the International Space Station (ISS). On Wednesday, the country’s Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry unveiled the plan to improve the HTV craft at a meeting of a panel of space development experts. The ministry plans to include relevant expenses in its budget estimate for next fiscal year if the plan is approved by the government’s Committee on the National Space Policy.The spacecraft is four meters across and about 10 meters…
  • Galaxy’s Snacking Habits Revealed

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    21 May 2015 | 2:51 pm
    A team of Australian and Spanish astronomers have caught a greedy galaxy gobbling on its neighbours and leaving crumbs of evidence about its dietary past. Galaxies grow by churning loose gas from their surroundings into new stars, or by swallowing neighbouring galaxies whole. However, they normally leave very few traces of their cannibalistic habits. A study published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) not only reveals a spiral galaxy devouring a nearby compact dwarf galaxy, but shows evidence of its past galactic snacks in unprecedented detail.Australian…
  • WISE Spacecraft Discovers Most Luminous Galaxy in Universe

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    21 May 2015 | 2:31 pm
    A remote galaxy shining with the light of more than 300 trillion suns has been discovered using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The galaxy is the most luminous galaxy found to date and belongs to a new class of objects recently discovered by WISE -- extremely luminous infrared galaxies, or ELIRGs. "We are looking at a very intense phase of galaxy evolution," said Chao-Wei Tsai of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, lead author of a new report appearing in the May 22 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "This dazzling light may be from…
  • India Plans Next Inter-planetary Expedition

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    21 May 2015 | 2:11 pm
    After India's much hailed successful missions to the Moon and Mars that boosted its global standing in space, the next inter-planetary expedition to be launched is under discussion, according to ISRO. "Currently, discussions are going on...on Venus, Mars, any planetary system,"Indian Space Research Organisation Chairman A S Kiran Kumar told reporters, adding, an advisory committee headed by renowned space scientist UR Rao was looking into the issue.Scripting space history, India had on September 24 last year placed its low-cost Mars spacecraft in orbit around the red planet, making it…
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    Insight Observatory

  • Students Observe Venus, Jupiter and the Moon

    Michael Petrasko
    4 May 2015 | 5:30 am
    Students Prepare to Observe at the Observatory.The rewards of witnessing students acquire their first visual views and photographic images of Venus, Jupiter and the Moon are absolutely priceless. On the evening of Tuesday, April 28th, 2105, at 7:30pm EDT, 10 students from the Astronomy Club at the Sacred Heart School in Kingston, MA, gathered at the Kohout-Dingley Observatory located on the school's campus grounds. The goal for the evening was to observe and learn a little about Venus, Jupiter and the Moon through the observatory's 11" telescope with direction from staff members from Insight…
  • Methods for Observing the Lyrid Meteor Shower

    Michael Petrasko
    22 Apr 2015 | 6:41 am
    Lyrid meteor photographed back in the 2012 showerThis month’s Lyrid meteor shower isn't one of the year's strongest displays, and with Moon being in a thin, waxing crescent, it won't offer much competition. As with January’s Quadrantids, the Lyrids put on a fairly brief performance, and this year the predicted peak on April 22nd at 23:00 UT.The Lyrid meteors appear to radiate from a location near the Hercules-Lyra border, which is high in the sky from about 11 p.m. until dawn. The Lyrid meteor shower has been observed for more than 2,000 years; Chinese records say "stars fell like…
  • The March 2015 Solar Eclipse

    Muir Evenden
    11 Apr 2015 | 9:15 am
    The author's image of the March 20, 2015Solar Eclipse visible from Krakow, PolandWhen I heard that the March 20, 2015 total solar eclipse would be visible as a partial solar eclipse from Krakow, Poland, I had a dilemma: how can I observe this event when I possessed no adequate filter to protect my camera so I could photograph it? In the past I used to own a specialized solar filter made from mylar, and so I thought: what do I have now that has such a similar property? The answer was remarkably simple: a blank DVD. Luckily I possessed a blank DVD with no artwork on the top that might…
  • Astronomical Sketching

    Michael Petrasko
    28 Mar 2015 | 10:20 am
    Lunar Crater Gassendl Sketched by Achim RoheI guess its valid to say that this post is a follow-up to one of my most recent posts called "Keeping an Observing Log". Recently, I was searching for some good RSS Feed content for our Insight Observatory's blog and stumbled upon a website that is similar to NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day website. The difference is that its entitled "Astronomy Sketch of the Day" and features astronomical sketches of astronomical objects or phenomena observed in detail submitted by amateur astronomers around the globe. As I may have mentioned before in one…
  • Cloudy Sky Blues and a Visit to the Planetarium

    Muir Evenden
    14 Mar 2015 | 2:48 am
    Heavens of Copernicus Planetarium, Warsaw, PolandI needed a little inspiration: too many cloudy days here this winter in Poland...what else should I expect? Luckily relief was not too far behind. In early February I found myself on a trip to Warsaw with my wife to explore the city and it's culture, including a visit to the new Copernicus Science Center, and most importantly to their Heavens of Copernicus Planetarium. It was my first visit to one of the newer style of planetariums that utilize a number of digital projectors (no large Zeiss or Spitz dumbbell projector here), as well as a…
 
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    Nerdynaut - Cyber

  • How to connect multiple RSS feeds in to one

    27 Apr 2015 | 10:52 pm
    In this article we are going to guide to merge or mix multiple individual RSS feeds updates in to one place. This service will make easier to update your brain with new information.   RSS (Rich Site Summary)Blogs, email newsletters, NEWS-Related sites and many more online publishers syndicate their web content as a RSS feed. This service will give opportunity to stay informed the latest content of those publishers for people who regularly use the web.connecting multiple RSS feeds in to oneStep 1 :- Collect the RSS feed Address of your favorite publishers. (A few RSS feeds of…
  • Get your site under your control with GetSiteControl

    24 Apr 2015 | 12:09 am
    GetSiteControl is a service that you can use for optimizing your website with its easy-to-use set of smart widgets. This service gives the opportunity for quickly add elements that engage website visitors and help to increase conversions. It’s easy to install and so easy to manage.  This service is owned by GetWebCraft Limited Company which registered in Cyprus. By using this service, you can add Survey, Contact, Promo, Subscribe, Follow, Share and Chat widget without spending money. Follow steps to install this service to your website.Step 1 :-  Go…
  • OH Yeah! This is How to Make Custom Domain E-Mail Accounts for Free

    28 Mar 2015 | 7:02 pm
    May be you have a company, May be you have a website for your company, But do your company members use E-mails with your company’s web domain like dcshehan@nerdynaut.gaMay be your answer is “Yeah”. But let me guess are those E-Mail address made from Google Apps  or Microsoft Office 365. But let me ask you a question, Are they free of charge. Yep, it’s not free. Because of this reason I also don’t like these services. But Finally I found a free solution for this work. It’s Yandex Mail. Yandex  is Russian company and it’s is a…
  • Best funny Facebook apps to be silly

    6 Feb 2015 | 12:24 am
    This article is a list of funny Applications that work using the details and permission of your Facebook Account and sometimes other social accounts too… All these apps are individually tested by me and the result of mine also here and guys please don’t take serious when you have bad result from some apps because these are just apps that work using different algorithms, Never mind your date of death, your ambitions etc.  For What You will be Always Remembered? What thing people will always remember about you? A fun app to know what people will remember about you whenever…
  • Google Web Designer - Bring ideas to life across screens

    23 Jan 2015 | 2:44 am
    Google Web Designer is a free and professional-grade HTML5 authoring tool for Windows, Mac and Linux for building interactive, animated and creative HTML 5 contents.  No coding knowledge necessary for this.  An Overview of the updated Google Web Designer Download Google Web Designer  Mac 10.7.x or later, Win 7 or later, Linux (Debian/Ubuntu/Fedora/openSUSE) Hi I am DCShehan. I am a researcher of Hackengine. Click to know more about me. by DCShehan
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    Space Facts

  • Milky Way Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    4 May 2015 | 4:54 am
    The Milky Way Galaxy is our home galaxy in the universe. It is a fairly typical barred spiral with four major arms in its disk, at least one spur, and a newly discovered outer arm. The galactic centre, which is located about 26,000 light-years from Earth, contains at least one supermassive black hole (called Sagittarius […] The post Milky Way Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Andromeda Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    3 May 2015 | 11:27 am
    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way and is one of a few galaxies that can be seen unaided from the Earth. In approximately 4.5 billion years the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to collide and the result will be a giant elliptical galaxy. Andromeda is accompanied […] The post Andromeda Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Sombrero Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    2 May 2015 | 3:24 pm
    The Sombrero Galaxy is one of the most unusual looking barred spiral galaxies visible from Earth. Its bright nucleus, large central bulge and spiral arms threaded through with a thick dust lane make it look a little like a hat from Mexico. The dust lane is a ring that circles the bulge of the galaxy, and […] The post Sombrero Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Whirlpool Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    1 May 2015 | 3:13 pm
    The Whirlpool Galaxy is a familiar one to stargazers and among the many close galaxy neighbors to our own Milky Way. Because of its shape, it was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral by astronomers. Today, it interests astronomers due to its spiral structure and the interaction it appears to be having […] The post Whirlpool Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Pictures of Pluto

    Chris
    1 May 2015 | 12:18 pm
    When the New Horizons spacecraft passes Pluto in 2015 it will be the furthest object from the Earth that has been examined up close, although even at its closet New Horizons will pass Pluto at a distance of around 9,650 kilometres. New Horizons Photos These are among the first few images returned by New Horizons’ LORRI […] The post Pictures of Pluto appeared first on Space Facts.
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