Astronomy

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  • Losing the Comet but Winning the Ring

    Astronomy Today
    Kelly
    16 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    The Ring Nebula, M57 in Lyra, by John Chumack When the clouds finally cleared from overhead, they were replaced by clouds upon the ground. I stood in my driveway looking up at the stars arrayed above while fog swirled around my feet. These are not ideal conditions for observing, but at least the stars can be seen, whereas the clouds had been blocking all manner of wonders, including the recent aurora, for nights on end. My goal has been to find Comet Jacques and – spoiler alert – I still have not accomplished it. Even though I’ve used the finder maps and zeroed in on exactly where it…
  • Changing Feature on Titan

    Astronomy News
    Tom
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:54 pm
    Images showing changes in the Ligeia Mare on Titan. Click for larger. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell Shifting patterns in the Titan landscape. Cool stuff indeed. This is the only place we’ve seen liquid seas/oceans beyond Earth, volcano’s yes, liquid oceans no. Ok so the seas/oceans on the Saturn moon Titan are mostly ethane and methane, still counts. Now enough history in images has been collected we can see changes in the seas/oceans structure, thanks to this great mission. The press release offers possible explanations, could be as simple as well, gee I’m not…
  • Behold: 100 Planetary Nebulas

    Universe Today
    Nancy Atkinson
    29 Sep 2014 | 2:09 pm
    100 colorful planetary nebulae, at apparent size relative to one another. Image processing and collection by Judy Schmidt. If you like planetary nebulas, you’re in luck. Multimedia artist Judy Schmidt has put together an amazing collection of 100 of these colorful glowing shells of gas and plasma, all at apparent size relative to one another. There’s even a giant-sized 10,000 pixel-wide version available on Flickr. How many of these planetary nebulae can you identify? (...)Read the rest of Behold: 100 Planetary Nebulas (161 words) © nancy for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink |…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday October 2 to Thursday October 9

    Astroblog
    29 Sep 2014 | 4:37 pm
    The Full Moon is Wednesday October 8, there is a total Lunar Eclipse at this time. Mercury is still easily visible. Mars climbs the body of the Scorpion. Saturn is low in the evening sky. Jupiter becomes more prominent in the morning sky. Comets everywhere!The Full Moon is Wednesday October 8. There is a total Lunar Eclipse in the early evening. Daylight saving time starts October 5.Eastern horizon as seen from Adelaide on 8 October at 8:09 pm ACDST . The eclipse is just starting. Click to embiggen.On the evening of 8 October there will be a total eclipse of the Moon. The 8 October eclipse…
  • Gerry Neugebauer

    Hogg's Research
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:42 am
    I learned late on Friday that Gerry Neugebauer (Caltech) has died. Gerry was one of the most important scientists in my research life, and in my personal life. He co-advised my PhD thesis (with also Roger Blandford and Judy Cohen); we spent many nights together at the Keck and Palomar Observatories, and many lunches together with Tom Soifer and Keith Matthews at the Athenaeum (the Caltech faculty club).In my potted history (apologies in advance for errors), Gerry was one of the first people (with Bob Leighton) to point an infrared telescope at the sky; he found far more sources bright in the…
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    Astronomy Today

  • Losing the Comet but Winning the Ring

    Kelly
    16 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    The Ring Nebula, M57 in Lyra, by John Chumack When the clouds finally cleared from overhead, they were replaced by clouds upon the ground. I stood in my driveway looking up at the stars arrayed above while fog swirled around my feet. These are not ideal conditions for observing, but at least the stars can be seen, whereas the clouds had been blocking all manner of wonders, including the recent aurora, for nights on end. My goal has been to find Comet Jacques and – spoiler alert – I still have not accomplished it. Even though I’ve used the finder maps and zeroed in on exactly where it…
  • Targeting Sagittarius

    Kelly
    31 Aug 2014 | 7:55 am
    M8, The Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius, by John Chumack Sagittarius is an incredibly rich area for stargazing, but it’s only easily viewable for a short time. Summer is the best season for observing, but even then it stays low on the southern horizon. Sagittarius is an easy constellation even for children to spot because it has a grouping of stars that looks almost exactly like a teapot. Get out a pair of binoculars or use the finderscope on your telescope and scan the area until you find a fuzzy patch in the sky. Then look through the eyepiece of the telescope to see if you’ve captured a…
  • Observing Summer Constellations

    Kelly
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The Milky Way and Vega by John Chumack On summer evenings as adults sit around bonfires and kids run in the yard playing flashlight tag, eyes turn skyward. Teach your friends and family the most important summer constellations with this handy guide on what star formations are overhead. Start with the easiest constellation just to orient yourself in the star-filled sky. The Big Dipper is neither a true constellation or a specifically summer constellation, but it will help you get started. The Big Dipper is easy to located in the northwest on summer evenings and is circumpolar, meaning that it…
  • Crossing off the Bucket List: Zodiacal Light

    Kelly
    27 May 2014 | 12:11 pm
    The Zodiacal Light looks pyramidal shaped from horizon stretching upward. Credit: ESO/Y. Beletsky Amateur astronomers never really take a vacation from stargazing. And in fact, sometimes vacations provide for the best stargazing. Over spring break this year my family and I did a tour of the national parks, starting and ending our vacation in Las Vegas, one of the most light polluted locations on Earth. But McCarran International airport made for a good spot to begin our travels first to Utah’s national parks, then to Great Basin National Park in Nevada along the loneliest highway in…
  • Up for the Lunar Eclipse

    Kelly
    30 Apr 2014 | 6:14 am
    The Moon in Eclipse with Mars and Spica, April 2014 As a chronic insomniac, I didn’t feel the need to set my alarm for the April lunar eclipse. Just the night before I had been awake from 3:45 to 5:30, so I figured that there was a good chance that sometime within the window of the eclipse I would be awake. At my location, totality would last from 2:07 to 3:25 a.m. with partial phases for an hour on either side of that. Surely I would be awake for some of it. I was actually deep asleep around 2:15 a.m. when my phone buzzed beside me three times. Someone who follows my twitter feed was…
 
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    Astronomy News

  • Changing Feature on Titan

    Tom
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:54 pm
    Images showing changes in the Ligeia Mare on Titan. Click for larger. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell Shifting patterns in the Titan landscape. Cool stuff indeed. This is the only place we’ve seen liquid seas/oceans beyond Earth, volcano’s yes, liquid oceans no. Ok so the seas/oceans on the Saturn moon Titan are mostly ethane and methane, still counts. Now enough history in images has been collected we can see changes in the seas/oceans structure, thanks to this great mission. The press release offers possible explanations, could be as simple as well, gee I’m not…
  • DDO 68 An Odd Little Galaxy

    Tom
    28 Sep 2014 | 9:32 pm
    A dwarf galaxy DDO68 might not be as young as it seems. Copyright: NASA, ESA. Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute) From the ESA’s Hubble page: Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it – capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us. Looking further into the very…
  • Curiosity Update

    Tom
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:51 am
    It’s been a while since I posted a Curiosity update. The rover has reached Mt. Sharp and has conducted a drill sample and will be analyzing it very shortly. Video souce
  • Close Encounters with Venus

    Tom
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:41 am
    Here’s a new video of ESA Euronews featuring Venus and the ESA Venus Express spacecraft. Click here for the Souce Video and links for this video in other languages.
  • BOPPS

    Tom
    25 Sep 2014 | 9:56 pm
    Taken during night time calibration. The circle of stars is a result of 100-30 second exposures as they travel around Polaris. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL I just love these balloon missions. The Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) is a high-altitude, stratospheric balloon mission that is planned for launch today to study a number of objects in our solar system, including an Oort cloud comet. The balloon payload, a gondola measuring 6.7 meters tall (22 feet) tall and 2.4 meters wide (8 feet) wide and weighs in at 5,200 pounds. If all goes as planned the balloon will hoist the…
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    Universe Today

  • Behold: 100 Planetary Nebulas

    Nancy Atkinson
    29 Sep 2014 | 2:09 pm
    100 colorful planetary nebulae, at apparent size relative to one another. Image processing and collection by Judy Schmidt. If you like planetary nebulas, you’re in luck. Multimedia artist Judy Schmidt has put together an amazing collection of 100 of these colorful glowing shells of gas and plasma, all at apparent size relative to one another. There’s even a giant-sized 10,000 pixel-wide version available on Flickr. How many of these planetary nebulae can you identify? (...)Read the rest of Behold: 100 Planetary Nebulas (161 words) © nancy for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink |…
  • Stunning Astrophoto: Milky Way Over Fünfländerblick

    Nancy Atkinson
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:38 pm
    ‘Fu?nfla?nderblick Milchstrasse,’ the Milky Way over a dark country sky in Switzerland. Credit and copyright: Christian Kamber. Hey, it’s #MilkyWayMonday! This gorgeous photo of the Milky Way was taken by astrophotographer Christian Kamber near Fu?nfla?nderblick, Switzerland (you can see the region on a map here). This is a stack of 20 shots, made with Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop. Lovely! (...)Read the rest of Stunning Astrophoto: Milky Way Over Fünfländerblick (44 words) © nancy for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: #milkywaymonday,…
  • PanSTARRS K1, the Comet that Keeps Going and Going and Going

    Bob King
    29 Sep 2014 | 8:03 am
    Comet C/2012 K1 PanSTARRS photographed on September 26, 2014. Two tails are seen – a dust tail points off to the left and the gas or ion tail to the right. Copyright: Rolando Ligustri Thank you K1 PanSTARRS for hanging in there!  Some comets crumble and fade away. Others linger a few months and move on. But after looping across the night sky for more than a year, this one is nowhere near quitting. Matter of fact, the best is yet to come.(...)Read the rest of PanSTARRS K1, the Comet that Keeps Going and Going and Going (536 words) © Bob King for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink |…
  • Time Dilation Confirmed in the Lab

    Shannon Hall
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    The GSI accelerator in Germany. Credit: A. Zschau, GSI It sounds like science fiction, but the time you experience between two events depends directly on the path you take through the universe. In other words, Einstein’s theory of special relativity postulates that a person traveling in a high-speed rocket would age more slowly than people back on Earth. Although few physicists doubt Einstein was right, it’s crucial to verify time dilation to the best possible accuracy. Now, an international team of researchers, including Nobel laureate Theodor Hänsch, director of the Max Planck…
  • Assembly Completed on Powerful Delta IV Rocket Boosting Maiden Orion Capsule Test Flight

    Ken Kremer
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:18 pm
    A United Launch Alliance technician monitors the core booster elements of a Delta IV Heavy rocket after being integrated in preparation for Exploration Flight Test-1 at Space Launch Complex 37 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FL – Assembly of the powerful Delta IV rocket boosting the pathfinder version of NASA’s Orion crew capsule on its maiden test flight in December has been completed. Orion is NASA’s next generation human rated vehicle that will eventually carry America’s astronauts beyond Earth on voyages…
 
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    Astroblog

  • The Sky This Week - Thursday October 2 to Thursday October 9

    29 Sep 2014 | 4:37 pm
    The Full Moon is Wednesday October 8, there is a total Lunar Eclipse at this time. Mercury is still easily visible. Mars climbs the body of the Scorpion. Saturn is low in the evening sky. Jupiter becomes more prominent in the morning sky. Comets everywhere!The Full Moon is Wednesday October 8. There is a total Lunar Eclipse in the early evening. Daylight saving time starts October 5.Eastern horizon as seen from Adelaide on 8 October at 8:09 pm ACDST . The eclipse is just starting. Click to embiggen.On the evening of 8 October there will be a total eclipse of the Moon. The 8 October eclipse…
  • Total Lunar Eclipse, October 8, 2014

    25 Sep 2014 | 7:28 am
    Eastern horizon as seen from Sydney on 8 October at 7:57 pm AEDST. The eclipse is just about to begin. Click to embiggenEastern horizon as seen from Adelaide on 8 October at 8:09 pm ACDST . The eclipse is just starting. Click to embiggenEastern horizon as seen from Perth on 8 October at 6:48 pm AWST. The eclipse is about halfway to totality. Click to embiggenAbove the North-Eastern horizon as seen from Sydney on 8 October at 9:55 pm AEDST. The eclipse is at its maximum extent . Click to embiggenNorth-Eastern horizon as seen from Adelaide on 8 October at 8:55 pm ACDST. The total eclipse has…
  • The Sky This Week - Thursday September 25 to Thursday October 2

    23 Sep 2014 | 4:58 am
    The First Quarter Moon is Thursday October 2. Mercury, the bright star Spica and the crescent Moon form a triangle in the sky on the 26th. The crescent Moon then visits Saturn on the 28th. Mars climbs the body of the Scorpion and is close to Antares from the 28th to the 30th. The waxing Moon is close to Mars on the 29th and 30th.  Jupiter becomes more prominent in the morning sky. Comets C/2013 A1 Siding Spring and C/2013 V5 are in the reach of small telescopes.  The First Quarter Moon is Thursday October 2.Evening sky on Saturday September 20 looking west as seen from Adelaide at…
  • Mercury comes close to Spica , 20 and 21 September, 2014

    21 Sep 2014 | 7:06 am
    Evening sky on Friday September 20 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 19:30 (7:30 pm) ACST in South Australia. (click to embiggen to get a better view)Evening sky on Sunday September 21 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 19:00 (7:00 pm) ACST in South Australia. (click to embiggen to get a better view)Mercury has finally caught up to Spica and passed it. The pair were closest on the 20th, hoever due to fatherly taxi duties I could only get the pair when they were just about to sink into the murk of the horizon. Tonight was better, as Mercury began to pull away from Spica.In all the ages…
  • Mars climbs the Scorpion, September 21, 2014

    21 Sep 2014 | 5:51 am
    Evening sky on Sunday September 10 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 21:00 (9:00 pm) ACST in South Australia.Mars is climbing up the Scorpion, heading for a rendezvous with red Antares (click to embiggen).Stack of 10 x 15 second exposures (Pentax K10, 1600 ASA), stacked in Deep Sky Stacker, then levels adjusted with the GIMP. Comes out a lot more orange than with my Canon point and shoot.
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    Hogg's Research

  • Gerry Neugebauer

    28 Sep 2014 | 6:42 am
    I learned late on Friday that Gerry Neugebauer (Caltech) has died. Gerry was one of the most important scientists in my research life, and in my personal life. He co-advised my PhD thesis (with also Roger Blandford and Judy Cohen); we spent many nights together at the Keck and Palomar Observatories, and many lunches together with Tom Soifer and Keith Matthews at the Athenaeum (the Caltech faculty club).In my potted history (apologies in advance for errors), Gerry was one of the first people (with Bob Leighton) to point an infrared telescope at the sky; he found far more sources bright in the…
  • interstellar bands; PSF dictionaries

    26 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Gail Zasowski (JHU) gave an absolutely great talk today, about diffuse interstellar bands in the APOGEE spectra and their possible use as tools for mapping the interstellar medium and measuring the kinematics of the Milky Way. Her talk also made it very clear what a huge advance APOGEE is over previous surveys: There are APOGEE stars in the mid-plane of the disk on the other side of the bulge! She showed lots of beautiful data and some results that just scratch the surface of what can be learned about the interstellar medium with stellar spectra.In CampHogg group meeting in the morning, we…
  • overlapping stars, stellar training sets

    25 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    On the phone with Schölkopf, Wang, Foreman-Mackey, and I tried to understand how it is that we can fit some insanely variable stars in the Kepler data using other stars, when the variability seems so specific to each star. In one case we investigated, it turned out that the crazy variability of one star (below) was perfectly matched by the variability of another, brighter star. What gives? It turns out that the two stars overlap on the detector, so their footprints actually share pixels! The shared variability is caused by the situation that they are being photometered through overlapping…
  • deep learning and exoplanet transits

    24 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    At group meeting, Foreman-Mackey and Wang showed recent results on calibration of K2 and Kepler data, respectively, and Malz showed some SDSS spectra of the night sky. After group meeting, Elizabeth Lamm (NYU) came to ask about possible Data Science capstone projects. We pitched a project on finding exoplanets with Gaia data and another on finding exoplanet transits with deep learning! The latter project was based on Foreman-Mackey's realization that everything that makes convolutional networks great for finding kittens in video also makes them great for finding transits in variable-star…
  • half full or half empty?

    23 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Interestingly (to me, anyway), as I have been raving in this space about how awesome it is that Ness and I can transfer stellar parameter labels from a small set of "standard stars" to a huge set of APOGEE stars using a data driven model, Rix (who is one of the authors of the method) has been seeing our results as requiring some spin or adjustment in order to be impressive to the stellar parameter community. I see his point: What impresses me is that we get good structure in the label (stellar parameter) space and we do very well where the data overlap the training sample. What concerns Rix…
 
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    Astronomy Cmarchesin

  • Signs of the formation of a planetary system around the star HD 169142

    29 Sep 2014 | 8:00 pm
    Image at 7 mm wavelength of the dusty disk around the star HD 169142 obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 7 mm wavelength. The positions of the protoplanet candidates are marked with plus signs (+) (Osorio et al. 2014, ApJ, 791, L36). The insert in the upper right corner shows, at the same scale, the bright infrared source in the inner disk cavity, as observed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at 3.8 micron wavelength (Reggiani et al. 2014, ApJ, 792, L23). Young star HD169142 displays a disk of gas and dust with two annular gaps possibly due to the formation of planetsPlanets…
  • Interstellar molecules are branching out

    28 Sep 2014 | 8:00 pm
    Dust and molecules in the central region of our Galaxy: The background image shows the dust emission in a combination of ... [more] © MPIfR/A. Weiß (background image), University of Cologne/M. Koerber (molecular models), MPIfR/A. Belloche (montage). The central region of the Milky Way above the antennas of the ALMA observatory. The direction to the Galactic center is ... [more] © Y. Beletsky (LCO)/ESODetection of iso-propyl cyanide with ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter ArrayScientists from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (Bonn, Germany), Cornell University…
  • The Architecture of Planetary Systems

    26 Sep 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Astronomers have analyzed the orbits of 365 observed systems of suspected, multiple exoplanets. This figure shows the relative placements and sizes of the planets in systems with three or more planets. The horizontal axis shows the orbital period in days for these systems, in all of which the planets are very to their stars and so complete their annual orbit in under about 100 days (a few suspected planets orbit in under one day!). The planetary radii are colored with the largest in each system being red; most of the planets in this study are between about one and four Earth-radii.
  • Earth’s Water is Older than the Sun

    26 Sep 2014 | 8:00 pm
    An illustration of water in our Solar System through time from before the Sun’s birth through the creation of the planets. The image is credited to Bill Saxton, NSF/AUI/NRAO. A larger version is available here. Another image is available here Washington, D.C.—Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work from a team including…
  • How NASA Watches CMEs

    25 Sep 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Two main types of explosions occur on the sun: solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Unlike the energy and x-rays produced in a solar flare – which can reach Earth at the speed of light in eight minutes – coronal mass ejections are giant clouds of solar material that take one to three days to reach Earth. Once at Earth, these ejections, also called CMEs, can impact satellites in space or interfere with radio communications. During CME Week from Sept. 22 to 26, 2014, we explore different aspects of these giant eruptions that surge out from the star we live with. Space weather models…
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    The Urban Astronomer

  • Red 'Stars' and White Moon

    24 Sep 2014 | 12:01 am
    Slender Moon, Mars and moreFor the next week, the twilight sky will feature a close alignment of two bright shiny red objects, Mars and Antares, and the slender Moon wending its way through the southwestern sky. The Moon encounters the ringed planet Saturn on Saturday 27th and then brackets the close pairing of orange-red Mars and the red supergiant star Antares in the constellation Scorpius. This first lunar cycle of autumn should start out beautifully with the waxing Moon and some lovely alignments. Look south and west shortly after sunset each evening for the best viewing.Image courtesy…
  • Luxury Star Gazing

    10 Sep 2014 | 3:33 pm
    Ritz Carlton Half Moon BayFall in the San Francisco Bay Area means clear skies and mild temperatures, and clear skies along the coast - a welcome change after the fog of summer. If you are in the Bay Area in the coming months, stop by the Ritz Carlton Hotel and Resort in Half Moon Bay for a Friday night star party. I am running star parties there a couple Fridays per month and love the setting, the reasonably dark skies, and the fun interaction with guests from all around the world. The patio is located on a stunningly beautiful stretch of California coast next to the 18th green of the Ocean…
  • Celebrate the Moon - Saturday September 6th

    2 Sep 2014 | 10:54 pm
    This Saturday is International Observe The Moon Night. Where will you be for this special evening? I'll be conducting sidewalk astronomy in front of the Exploratorium in San Francisco along with other astronomy enthusiasts. The Moon will be a few days away from another Supermoon, and if the skies cooperate, we should have a lovely view of Earth's natural satellite in gibbous phase between first quarter and full. Click the link for more information on International Observe The Moon Night. Hope to see you at an event.
  • KFOG Broadcast - August 12, 2014

    22 Aug 2014 | 8:59 am
    I paid a visit to the KFOG Morning Show and had a fun chat with Renee about the Supermoon, Perseid Meteor Shower, How to Look At The Night Sky, and Star Parties in and around San Francisco. Click here to listen. 
  • Jupiter & Venus Conjunction – Closest Approach Since 2000

    14 Aug 2014 | 4:08 pm
    After the Moon, the two brightest objects in the night sky are the planets Venus and Jupiter. Venus is a close neighbor and a very reflective planet, dominating morning and evening skies with its brilliant white shimmer against the changing colors of the dawn or dusk sky. Jupiter is the giant planet of the Solar System and despite its distance, is a bold and bright object for us to enjoy, especially in a telescope or binoculars. Venus & Jupiter ConjunctionThese two planets, like all of the objects in the Solar System, gradually change their position with respect to the background stars…
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    sci.astro

  • Re: EINSTEINIANS TEACH DOPPLER EFFECT

    30 Sep 2014 | 2:17 am
    Einsteinians teaching that a light source which starts moving towards the observer sends, just like a sound source, SHORTER wavelength: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDvIhiCnatE "Doppler Effect In Light Waves" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4OnBYrbCjY "The Doppler Effect: what does motion do
  • Re: OT: Emma Watson's recent address to the UN

    29 Sep 2014 | 7:51 pm
    In article , Desertphile wrote: > On Mon, 22 Sep 2014 06:31:33 -0230, David Dalton wrote: > > > Newsgroups: > > sci.physics,sci.math,sci.astro,alt.global-warming,alt.support.depression > > Wrong newsgroups, Shit-for
  • I write articles

    29 Sep 2014 | 2:02 pm
    I am trying to create a lot of records about my theories. I do not want any person to read my articles.  Good people will not read my articles. A lot of people try to stop people from knowing about good theories.  A lot of people try to stop people from getting credit for their theories. there is
  • Re: OT: Emma Watson's recent address to the UN

    29 Sep 2014 | 11:05 am
    On Mon, 22 Sep 2014 06:31:33 -0230, David Dalton wrote: > Newsgroups: sci.physics,sci.math,sci.astro,alt.global-warming,alt.support.depression Wrong newsgroups, Shit-for-brains. -- "Poor Jesus, people always asking but nobody brings pliers to pull out a few nails for him" -- Ali
  • A dwarf galaxy with an SMB larger than the Milky Way's!

    29 Sep 2014 | 4:03 am
    Hubble helps astronomers find smallest known galaxy with supermassive black hole | Astronomy.com http://www.astronomy.com/news/2014/09/hubble-helps-astronomers-find-smallest-known-galaxy-with-supermassive-black-hole The supermassive black hole at the center of M60-UCD1 makes up a huge 15 percent o
 
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    Big Picture Science

  • Land on the Run

    29 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    Hang on to your globe. One day it’ll be a collector’s item. The arrangement of continents you see today is not what it once was, nor what it will be tomorrow. Thank plate tectonics. Now evidence suggests that the crowding together of all major land masses into one supercontinent – Pangaea, as it’s called – is a phenomenon that’s happened over and over during Earth’s history. And it will happen again. Meet our future supercontinent home, Amasia, and learn what it will look like. Meanwhile, as California waits for the Big One, geologists discover that major earthquakes come in…
  • As You Were

    22 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE We all want to turn back time. But until we build a time machine, we’ll have to rely on a few creative approaches to capturing things as they were – and preserving them for posterity. One is upping memory storage capacity itself. Discover just how much of the past we can cram into our future archives, and whether going digital has made it all vulnerable to erasure. Plus – scratch it and tear it – then watch this eerily-smart material revert to its undamaged self. And, what was life like pre-digital technology? We can’t remember, but one writer knows; he’s living life circa…
  • Skeptic Check: Is It True?

    15 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    We often hear fantastic scientific claims that would change everything if true. Such as the report that algae is growing on the outside of the International Space Station or that engineers have built a rocket that requires no propellant to accelerate. We examine news stories that seem too sensational to be valid, yet just might be – including whether a killer asteroid has Earth’s name on it. Plus, a journalist investigates why people hold on to their beliefs even when the evidence is stacked hard against them – from skepticism about climate change to Holocaust denial. And, why…
  • A Sudden Change in Planets

    8 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    A planet is a planet is a planet. Unless it’s Pluto – then it’s a dwarf planet. But even then it’s a planet, according to experts. So what was behind the unpopular re-classification of Pluto by astronomers, and were they justified? As the New Horizons spacecraft closes in on this small body, one planetary scientist says that this dwarf planet could be more typical of planets than Mars, Mercury, and Saturn. And that our solar system has not 8 or even 9 planets, but 900. Also, meet a type of planet that’s surprisingly commonplace, although we don’t have one in our solar system:…
  • Welcome to Our Labor-atory

    1 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    ENCORE Hi ho, hi ho … it’s out with work we go! As you relax this holiday weekend, step into our labor-atory and imagine a world with no work allowed. Soft robots help us with tasks at home and at the office, while driverless cars allow us to catch ZZZZs in the front seat. Plus, the Internet of Everything interconnects all your devices, from your toaster to your roaster to … you. So there’s no need to ever get off the couch. But is a machine-ruled world a true utopia? And, the invention that got us into our 24/7 rat race: Edison’s electric light. Guests: Barry Trimmer –…
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    StarDate Online

  • Distant Hub

    damonddb
    29 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    27,000 years ago, Earth was locked in an Ice Age. Glaciers covered much of North America, and sea level was hundreds of feet lower than it is today. People were painting in caves and on canyon walls, and they were developing such weapons as the bow and arrow. Scientists have pieced together that view of the ancient past through centuries of excavations and lab work. But they can see one remnant of that time directly — the light from the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. That illustrates the vastness of our home galaxy. Light travels at 670 million miles per hour — almost six million million…
  • Moon, Mars, and Antares

    damonddb
    28 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    There’s a sweet alignment in the southwest as night falls this evening: the Moon, the planet Mars, and the star Antares. Mars and Antares are among the brightest pinpoints of light in the night sky, and both shine with a distinctly orange color. They line up below the Moon. Although Mars and Antares look almost identical, they couldn’t be more different. Mars is a planet — a ball of rock that’s about half as big as Earth. It shines only by reflecting sunlight. Antares, on the other hand, is a star — a ball of hot, glowing gases. Not only that, but it’s a supergiant star that’s…
  • Moon and Planets

    damonddb
    27 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Moon cruises between two planets early this evening. Saturn looks like a bright star to its lower right, with slightly brighter Mars to its left. The star Antares is below Mars, and shines almost the same color — bright orange. Saturn has more than 60 moons of its own. Mars has only two, but their discovery presents an interesting history. Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's travels, and the Mars moons Phobos (top left) and DeimosJonathan Swift wrote about them in his 1726 novel, Gulliver's Travels. Although his descriptions of the moons were accurate, there was a problem: The moons had not yet…
  • New Moon Rising?

    damonddb
    26 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    The Cassini spacecraft may have captures a small new moon taking shape at the outer edge of Saturn's rings. This image shows a small, bright arc at the bottom of the rings. Planetary scientists say this could be ring material clumping together to form a new moon. Small moons may come and go fairly often in the rings. [NASA/JPL/SSI] Text ©2014 The University of Texas at Austin McDonald ObservatoryFor more skywatching tips, astronomy news, and much more, read StarDate magazine.
  • Moon and Saturn

    damonddb
    26 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Saturn is encircled by beautiful rings and more than 60 known moons. And there may be a link between the two — an idea supported by what appears to be a small moon taking shape inside the rings. The possible moon is less than a mile across — too small to see directly. Last year, though, images from the Cassini spacecraft revealed a bright arc at the outer edge of Saturn’s A ring, the outermost of the planet’s main rings. The arc was hundreds of miles long, and may have formed when something hit the small moon and kicked off debris from its surface. Planetary scientists think this part…
 
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    Remanzacco Observatory - Comets & Neo

  • Close Approach of Asteroid 2014 RC

    Team
    5 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    The asteroid 2014 RC was discovered (at ~ magnitude +20.0) on 2014, September 01.2 by Catalina Sky Survey (MPC code 703) with a 0.68-m Schmidt + CCD (and independently detected the next night by the Pan-STARRS survey).2014 RC has an estimated size of 12 m - 26 m (based on the object's absolute magnitude H=26.8) and it will have a close approach with Earth at about 0.1 LD (Lunar Distances = ~384,000 kilometers) or 0.0003 AU (1 AU = ~150 million kilometers) at 1801 UT on 2014, September 07. This asteroid will reach the peak magnitude about +11.5 on Sep 7 between 17UT and 18UT.We performed some…
  • New Comet: C/2014 Q3 (BORISOV)

    Team
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:24 am
    Cbet nr. 3936, issued on 2014, August 24, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~17) by G. Borisov (Observatory MARGO, Nauchnij) on CCD images obtained with a 0.3-m f/1.5 astrograph telescope on 2014, August 22.02. The new comet has been designated C/2014 Q3 (BORISOV).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, August 23.4 from H06 (iTelescope network - Mayhill) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, shows that this object is a comet: coma about…
  • Rosetta has arrived at comet 67P!

    Team
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:26 am
    After an epic 10-year journey, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived today August 06, 2014 at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko becoming the first spacecraft to rendezvous with a comet.  Launched in March 2004, Rosetta had to make three gravity-assist flybys of Earth and one of Mars to help it on course to its rendezvous with the comet. This complex course also allowed Rosetta to pass by asteroids Šteins and Lutetia, obtaining unprecedented views and scientific data on these two objects. Rosetta woke up from deep space hibernation on 20 January 2014, nine million…
  • New Comet: C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE)

    Team
    13 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Cbet nr. 3921, issued on 2014, July 13, announces the discovery of a comet (~ magnitude 17) by the  Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (or NEOWISE; formerly the WISE satellite) team on images taken with the NEOWISE satellite on 2014, July 04.5. The new comet has been designated C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE).We performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 10 unfiltered exposures, 60-sec each, obtained remotely on 2014, July 09.6 from Q62 (iTelescope network - Siding Spring) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + focal reducer,…
  • Close Approach of PHA Asteroid 2014 MF6

    Team
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:27 am
    The asteroid 2014 MF6 was discovered (at magnitude ~17.0) on 2014, June 23.3 by Catalina Sky Survey (MPC code 703) with a 0.68-m Schmidt + CCD. According to the preliminay orbit, 2014 MF6 is an Apollo type asteroid. This class of asteroids are defined by having semi-major axes greater than that of the Earth (> 1 AU) but perihelion distances less than the Earth's aphelion distance (q < 1.017 AU). It is also flagged as a "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid". PHA are asteroids larger than approximately 100m that might have threatening close approaches to the Earth (they can come closer to…
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    Astronomy and Space News - Astro Watch

  • Recent Meteor Strikes May Not Be Random, Study Suggests

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Sep 2014 | 2:39 pm
    Meteor impacts are far less random than most scientists assumed, according to a new analysis of Earth-strike meteors. The research, reported on the pre-press astrophysics website ArXiv.org, concluded that meteor impacts are more likely to occur at certain times of the year when Earth's orbit takes us through streams of meteoroids. "It is customarily assumed that Earth-striking meteoroids are completely random, and that all the impacts must be interpreted as uncorrelated events distributed according to Poisson statistics. If this is correct, their impact dates must be uniformly spread…
  • Mystery 260 Square Km 'Island' Evolves on Saturn's Moon Titan

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Sep 2014 | 1:41 pm
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft is monitoring the evolution of a mysterious "island", a bright feature in a large hydrocarbon sea on Saturn's moon Titan. The feature covers an area of about 100 square miles (260 square kilometers) in Ligeia Mare, one of the largest seas on Titan. It has now been observed twice by Cassini's radar experiment, but its appearance changed between the two apparitions. The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark background of the liquid sea, was first spotted during Cassini's July 2013 Titan flyby. Previous observations showed no sign of…
  • Chinese Balloon Space Odyssey

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Travel to space in a high-tech balloon. Enjoy unprecedented views of the Earth and Sun before returning to solid ground in a parachute. It may sound like a pitch pulled from science fiction - but if Chinese Entrepreneur Jiang Fang succeeds, a galatic tour of the stars via balloon may available as early as next year. Fang, president of a Beijing-based company "Spacevision," told Xinhua on Monday they have already mapped out many of the technical aspects of such tour, which he says has been endorsed by many experts as feasible. Passengers would ascend to 40,000 metres in a pressurised capsule,…
  • India to Launch Navigational Satellite on October 10

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Sep 2014 | 11:41 am
    Following the grand success of Mars Orbiter Mission, ISRO scientists will reportedly launch navigational satellite, IRNSS 1C, on October 10. Out of the seven satellites planned for the formation of the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, IRNSS 1C is the third one. By next year all the seven satellites are planned to be in space. IRNSS will provide Standard Positioning Service and Restricted Service with a position accuracy of better than 20 meters in the 1500 kilometers area covering the Indian peninsula.This will provide terrestrial, aerial and marine navigation accurately and…
  • Fueled Orion Spacecraft Moved to Launch Abort System Facility

    Tomasz Nowakowski
    29 Sep 2014 | 11:02 am
    NASA’s new Orion spacecraft will make its first trip to space in December. The spacecraft took a much shorter trip Sunday when it was moved from a specialized fueling facility at Kennedy Space Center to the Launch Abort System (LAS) Facility to continue the preparations necessary for launch. The launch abort system is designed to protect astronauts if a problem happens during launch, by pulling Orion away from a failing rocket. Because this first Orion flight will be uncrewed, the abort motor that would fire to pull the spacecraft away is not active. However, the jettison motor which will…
 
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    Life of Controversy

  • HeForShe:The Peaceful Coexistence of the Sexes

    Word Smith
    25 Sep 2014 | 9:31 pm
    Dear Readers I’m sure by now you’ve all seen or heard of the UN pro-gender equality campaign #HeForShe, and especially the very eloquent Emma Watson‘s emotionally stirring speech.   The quiver in her voice I felt emphasized the direness of the situation and served to further strengthen the whole message.  Truly inspiring.This set me off on an exciting, gear crunching thought process. What is sexism derived from?Sexism stems from the biological differences between a male and a female, or in scientific terms the sexual dimorphism that arises due to the DNA…
  • Double O Desperation: Cloud Fall

    Word Smith
    8 Sep 2014 | 7:21 pm
    Dear readersLast week saw the fall from favour of the infamous cloud storage system.Some equally famous Celebrities have found themselves in an extremely awkward predicament as some sorry sexually frustratedSOBs caught them with their pants down……………literally. I’m slightly embarrassed to say that I too was subjected to this invasion of privacy as a..Ahem.. Slightly revealing photograph was released to a seedy part of the internet. But as internet amendment 34 states “If it exists…. Oh pardon me wrong amendment. I believe its amendment 43 that states “once it’s…
  • Em Drive: The Little Engine That Could

    Word Smith
    5 Sep 2014 | 11:01 pm
    Dear Readers In this vast Blogosphere it is vital to differentiate yourself from the rest of the faceless mass. I have done this by always being fashionably late and thus keeping stories alive. By giving you outdated news, I strive to combat their extremely high mortality rate. In this day and age People yearn for new and fresh things, it’s like they have this bottomless pit in their souls which they try to fill up by cramming the latest trend, radical acronyms, hip songs, etcetera, etcetera. First things first I’m the realest; so to those people I say screw you sirs and madams and while…
  • The Chronicles of NASA: The Man,the Moon & the Myth

    Word Smith
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:52 am
    It’s that merry time that comes once every year.The Celebration of our first trek off of this earthly sphere. It fills most Americans with patriotic cheer, as their rivals the Russians,boo and jeer. And in the middle of all this, what do I see? An age old controversy and so I shall end this rhyme, so weird and queerI now regret starting it, Oh dear, Oh dear Diminished hopes of being his peerI’m afraid this can’t compare to a sonnet of Shakespeare Thus concludes my short lived poet’s careerBut Wait! Oh Dear readers, the point is missed I fear!I have gone off on a tangent it would…
  • Transformers:The Rise of the Writer Robots

    Word Smith
    12 Jul 2014 | 4:23 am
    Dear Readers I bring to you this alarming bulletin immediately after stumbling upon the disturbing news that I am actually, a computer program. Hold on! Wait! Wait just a second…I’m getting a new update…After further experimentation, which involved slapping myself in the face (which hurt) and a swift sharp kick in the crotch (delivered by my girl friend ,which hurt even more; not because of her betrayal but more by the action itself) it is safe to conclude that, I, am real. Not so fast Geppetto, whether I’m a real boy or a girl shall be determined after doctors examine my…
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